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Crosswalks

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NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sarah Benson stepped off the curb of Main Street in Moorestown on Wednesday, in or near the tree-shaded crosswalk. Benson, 85, took two steps into the street, busy with lunch-hour traffic, and was hit by a car driven by Norma Magargee of Moorestown. She suffered a broken collarbone, a broken leg and a broken thumb, and was taken to Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, where she was in stable condition. Crossing Main Street, Route 537, isn't easy in Moorestown. As Benson's mishap showed, it can be downright life-threatening.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the first step in a journey of many miles, the opening shot in the police department's war on drivers who don't yield to pedestrians, bicyclists who barrel down crowded sidewalks and hordes of jaywalkers. Predictably, Day 1 of enforcement of Operation Crosswalk drew expressions of contrition, outrage, support and surprise from individuals whose bad habits were cited yesterday by police officers stationed at intersections in Center City and elsewhere. Quite a few pedestrians crossed at mid-block - jaywalked - or crossed against red lights at Broad and Spruce Streets yesterday while two uniformed officers stood in full view on the sidewalk - and then gave blank looks when the officers asked if they realized what they had done.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Drivers on Roosevelt Boulevard may need to stop more frequently beginning Thursday, when new stoplights will begin operating at five mid-block crosswalk locations. The signals will begin operating at Tomlinson Road, Bowler Street, Faunce Street, Friendship Street, and Longshore Avenue. The lights are designed to give pedestrians safer crosswalks, and the signals will include countdown timers to show how much time remains to get across the Boulevard. As part of the same $2.8 million project, crosswalks are being removed at Princeton Avenue and St. Vincent, Loney, Benner and Smylie Streets.
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Elisa Lala, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sight of a police officer tends to put motorists on their best behavior. But what if a driver isn't aware of an officer's presence? On Thursday morning, Collingswood Officer Anthony Garbarino stood before a crosswalk on Haddon Avenue at Irwin Avenue, about to cross the street. A vehicle whizzed by. "Red car," Garbarino said loud enough for others around him to hear. A minute later, a uniformed officer pulled the car over, and Garbarino, wearing a red T-shirt and jeans, was standing on the other side of the street, waiting to cross back.
NEWS
July 9, 2003 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A day after Gov. Rendell ordered the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to halt demolition of the decorative crosswalks on South Broad Street, the agency apologized for its actions and promised to restore the pedestrian character of the Philadelphia boulevard. PennDot spokesman Ed Myslewicz said his agency was now trying to determine the best way to repair the ruined intersections between City Hall and Washington Avenue. In the last two weeks, the agency removed most of the Z-shaped concrete blocks from the 15 crosswalks, which were a key element of Rendell's signature beautification project during his two terms as mayor.
NEWS
July 8, 2003 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
When Gov. Rendell was mayor of Philadelphia, the decorative brick crosswalks on South Broad Street were among his proudest achievements, helping to create the cosmopolitan visual ambience for his Avenue of the Arts project. But yesterday, the governor found himself battling his own state highway agency and ordered the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to stop further removal of the zigzag-patterned concrete blocks that define 15 intersections from City Hall to Washington Avenue.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Why do Mullica Hill residents cross the road? Only for a darn good reason, they say, because crosswalks installed last year along Main Street are dangerously hard to see, and no street signs warn approaching cars to slow down. "The only thing that's changed," said Eleanor Immler, whose bed-and-breakfast sits in front of one of the three crosswalks, "is that now if they hit you, they're in trouble. You're dead, but they have to pay a fine. " The problem lies in a trick of geography that briefly combines the traffic of two high-volume highways, Routes 45 and 322, over a mile of Main Street.
NEWS
August 5, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to protect pedestrians and reduce car crashes on deadly Roosevelt Boulevard, the state is installing 488 pedestrian-crosswalk countdown timers at 46 locations. The first timers were installed over the weekend, and U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D., Pa.), along with city and state officials, will officially introduce the signals today. The timers are designed to warn pedestrians how much time they have left to cross the street before the light changes. Roosevelt Boulevard is one of the city's most dangerous highways, with 2,584 crashes and 57 fatalities in the past five years.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Following repeated requests by parents to improve safety conditions on Route 82, the Board of Supervisors has agreed to paint crosswalks on the township-owned road between two schools and three residential neighborhoods. "At least we're moving forward," said Stacey Carter, whose daughter was killed in 1998 when she was trying to cross Route 82 near Patton Middle and Unionville High Schools. A meeting to determine the number and exact locations of the crosswalks could happen as early as this week.
NEWS
August 20, 2009
New Jersey's tragic rise in pedestrian fatalities has motivated authorities to begin undercover "stings" at crosswalks in towns across South Jersey. That's welcome news. The recent deaths of two young women, in Seaside Heights and Ocean City, were the latest examples in what has become an unacceptable and preventable epidemic in the Garden State. Of course, pedestrian accidents also are a chronic problem in Philadelphia. On July 17, Casey Feldman, 21, a Fordham University student from Springfield, Delaware County, was struck and killed in Ocean City.
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NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their voices echoed as they moved south down Haddon Avenue and under I-676, bouncing back from the light-green metal supports of the overpass as traffic rumbled overhead. "Watch out for kids! Put your cellphones down!" Gabby Colon chanted toward the cars that passed by, some honking in support. Around her walked more than 80 people, crowding and spilling over from the sidewalk into the street. Many wore white T-shirts with a picture of 5-year-old Richard Pagan superimposed on a Captain America shield.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
A BIGGER POLICE presence, speed-detection cameras and an engineering study - these are some of the ideas local leaders say should be explored in the wake of the horrific deaths Tuesday of a mother and her three children on Roosevelt Boulevard. City Controller Alan Butkovitz said he sent letters yesterday to Pennsylvania State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan and Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, asking both to put more cops on the notorious 12-lane highway. Butkovitz said his office studied unsafe crosswalks on the Boulevard in 2006 and recommended then that police presence be increased.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  One of New Jersey's most dangerous highways is getting new attention as lawmakers propose red lights with more sparkle, crosswalks so pronounced they practically scream "STOP," and stiffer traffic fines in an effort to reduce pedestrian deaths. A crackdown on speeders and jaywalkers is also underway on Route 130 in Burlington County, a 23-mile stretch where 19 pedestrians were killed in the last six years. But the head of the New Jersey Bike & Walk Coalition says a "culture change" is also needed.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A tearful girl who ran away from a crossing guard outside the Helen L. Beeler Elementary School on Friday morning turned up safe after seven Evesham Township police cars were deployed to the school. Police said the crossing guard asked what was troubling the girl but received no answer before the child disappeared from view. The woman then called 911. The girl, 7, was accounted for within 90 minutes of the 8:35 a.m. emergency call. But the seven-vehicle response and intensive search of the neighborhood sparked "a high volume" of calls from residents and parents worried about what was going on at Beeler.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Drivers on Roosevelt Boulevard may need to stop more frequently beginning Thursday, when new stoplights will begin operating at five mid-block crosswalk locations. The signals will begin operating at Tomlinson Road, Bowler Street, Faunce Street, Friendship Street, and Longshore Avenue. The lights are designed to give pedestrians safer crosswalks, and the signals will include countdown timers to show how much time remains to get across the Boulevard. As part of the same $2.8 million project, crosswalks are being removed at Princeton Avenue and St. Vincent, Loney, Benner and Smylie Streets.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were like bright-yellow dandelions. First one, then two. Then, everywhere. Ten years ago, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania bought 500 yield-to-pedestrian markers to be placed at crosswalks here and there. Now, there are 7,000 markers, with the number growing all the time. "State law," the portable, three-foot-high markers announce in black letters. They depict a triangular yield sign and show a stick figure of a man on foot. Could these markers - usually set down on the centerline of the road - really have the force of law, like a red light or a stop sign?
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - The wide avenues of the Upper West Side have some of this city's handsomest neighborhoods, premier cultural venues, and long stretches of green space. They also have a remarkably deadly history for pedestrians, a fact not lost on Joel Ruben as he ambled across Broadway. Ruben, 88, stood on the sidewalk and looked north into four lanes of traffic heading his way. As other pedestrians inched into the street against the "Don't walk" sign, looking to get a head start on the green light, Ruben hung back until he had the "Walk" sign.
NEWS
May 26, 2011
A new report singling out the nation's most dangerous metropolitan areas for pedestrians reaffirms Mayor Nutter's directive that City Hall's policy should be to promote a more walkable Philadelphia. Indeed, the report issued Tuesday by Transportation for America, an advocacy group, found that roads designed to speed motorists on their way - while shortchanging pavement and crosswalks - create dangerous conditions that led to the preventable deaths of more than 47,700 pedestrians over the last decade.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Running across a highway with traffic moving at up to 70 m.p.h. would be considered suicidal by most people. But 27-year-old Pedro Mendez does it as a matter of routine, walking from his home in Camden to his job as a janitor at a Pennsauken supermarket. He checks the westbound traffic, waits for a lull, then sprints to the concrete divider, which he straddles while waiting for a break in the eastbound traffic. "It's not dangerous," he said. "You just have to wait until there are no cars.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Can we forget about aesthetics for a moment and take time instead to savor the very real virtues of the new South Street Bridge? When the Schuylkill crossing opens Saturday after a heroic, 23-month reconstruction, Philadelphia finally will have a downtown bridge that caters to all users - drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians. The sidewalks are a decent width, the asphalt is as supple as velvet, and the white glyphs designating the roomy new bike lanes glisten like icing on a cake.
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