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NEWS
January 4, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Games and anti-games, from the mundane to the insane, come under our scrutiny this week. TV GUIDE MULTIMEDIA CROSSWORDS Trivia Works/InterMedia Windows / $19.95) You don't have to be a genius to get a perfect score on TV Guide's new multi-media crossword game. In truth, you really don't have to be very good at crosswords, at all. This new-age CD-ROM puzzle disc invites struggling players to cheat like crazy. If the text clue "He played Potsie on this show" isn't enough to clear your cobwebbed memory, just tap on the "multimedia" logo and get extra help in the form of a video clip, photograph or sound byte - in this case a still photo of "Happy Days" actor Anson Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Evan Birnholz sits in a sunny corner of his Center City brick walk-up and clicks on a 21-square grid that dominates his HP computer screen. He types in names of people with states in them. You know, like Hannah Montana, or Duncan Idaho. "It's anything that comes to my imagination," says the recently appointed crossword constructor for the Washington Post's Sunday edition - a gig that places him among the elite of newspaper cruciverbalists. Who would have thought an undergraduate chemistry major who, as a child, struggled to comprehend puns - the meat and potatoes of any crossword - would end up a top puzzle writer?
NEWS
June 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
'Philadelphia ends with the same five letters it starts with," says Merl Reagle. "Not too many cities do that. " And not too many people walk around with those kinds of lexicological distinctions in their noggin - dissecting words, analyzing vowels, looking for syllables that do things apart from just being syllabic. "And D-E, which is what links those same five letters in Philadelphia, that stands for Delaware, which is right across the river there," he adds. Reagle, 56, constructs crosswords for a living.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By Howard Means
Faithful workers of crossword puzzles already know that a miscellany of table spreads is an olio of oleo. They know that a Herman Melville novel is always - Omoo. They know - how could they help but? - that an aloe is a South African lily and medicinal herb, that a century plant is an agave and that "osier" refers, somehow, to any one of a number of related willows. Crossword puzzles are a four-letter-word world without any four-letter words you wouldn't want your children to hear.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernice Gordon, 101, the matriarch of American crossword puzzles, whose last puzzle appeared in the New York Times in August, died early Thursday, Jan. 29. Mrs. Gordon, a Philadelphia native who lived her last years in a Center City assisted-living community, started creating crosswords at age 35 as a young widow, home evenings with two small sons and needing something to engage her mind. She was rejected repeatedly at first. "My child," her mother scolded, "if you would spend as much time on cookbooks instead of crosswords, your family would be happier.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHAT'S A seven-letter word for legend? Try "BERNICE. " That would be Bernice Gordon, who became a legend by creating crossword puzzles, up until the age of 101, that appeared in many major U.S. newspapers for 63 years. More than 120 of her puzzles were published in the New York Times, which always claimed to have the most difficult, a challenge to the big-brain word masters and mistresses who dig this challenging sport. Bernice, a Philadelphia native, was 101 when she died Jan. 29. Her last puzzle for the Times appeared in August.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Want to know how to do a New York Times crossword puzzle in ink? For a puzzle enthusiast, that just might be the ultimate. So 25 of them showed up at the Montgomery County Library on Powell Street Saturday for a presentation by Jim Myers, a crossword designer whose puzzles have appeared in TV Guide and USA Today. The gathering was an opportunity for puzzle-doers to meet their real foe: the puzzle-maker. "The game is that you're trying to beat the author," said Joan Lundy of East Norriton, who has been doing crossword puzzles for 55 years.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | By Lillian Swanson
What a difference an inch makes. That's what a Bucks County reader said, who called to say how much she liked the new, leaner look to The Inquirer. A week ago today, the paper began using a new page size that is one inch narrower than before. We began by printing about 75,000 copies a day of the new-size paper on one press. It will take until early August to convert all nine presses to the new paper size. On the first day of the changeover, the paper received about a dozen calls and e-mails from people who said they liked the feel of the narrower page.
NEWS
December 28, 2005
Entries in the Inquirer Editorial Board's annual Year-in-Review crossword puzzle contest are due Saturday. To solve the puzzle online, readers may go to http://go.philly.com/yearcrossword.
NEWS
December 30, 2003
The clue for #124 across in Sunday's year-in-review crossword puzzle was incorrect. It should be "Cape Hatteras' st. " The clue for #43 across should read "she. "
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Evan Birnholz sits in a sunny corner of his Center City brick walk-up and clicks on a 21-square grid that dominates his HP computer screen. He types in names of people with states in them. You know, like Hannah Montana, or Duncan Idaho. "It's anything that comes to my imagination," says the recently appointed crossword constructor for the Washington Post's Sunday edition - a gig that places him among the elite of newspaper cruciverbalists. Who would have thought an undergraduate chemistry major who, as a child, struggled to comprehend puns - the meat and potatoes of any crossword - would end up a top puzzle writer?
NEWS
September 3, 2015
Missing Merl Last Sunday was the first without a crossword puzzle by the late and seriously missed Merl Reagle. Sunday morning didn't feel complete without one of his always delightful constructions. I hope The Inquirer adds another quality crossword in its place. I'd even be happy with a "Best of Reagle" series in the interim. |Michael Tearson, Westmont, mtearson@verizon.net Merl Reagle brought years of joy, frustration, amusement, confusion, ahas , and groans to this fan. My Sunday afternoon will never be the same.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The best ideas percolate when Jules Markey walks his Center City postal route. Down and across zip code 19130, he fills the silvery stacked mailboxes of five high-rise apartment buildings on Spring Garden Street. Puzzles help Markey combat the repetition. The other day, as he slipped an Entertainment Weekly into a mail slot on Brandywine Street, he remembered when trash served as inspiration for the first crossword of his the New York Times accepted. A resident on his route had discarded a pile of doors by the curb.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHAT'S A seven-letter word for legend? Try "BERNICE. " That would be Bernice Gordon, who became a legend by creating crossword puzzles, up until the age of 101, that appeared in many major U.S. newspapers for 63 years. More than 120 of her puzzles were published in the New York Times, which always claimed to have the most difficult, a challenge to the big-brain word masters and mistresses who dig this challenging sport. Bernice, a Philadelphia native, was 101 when she died Jan. 29. Her last puzzle for the Times appeared in August.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernice Gordon, 101, the matriarch of American crossword puzzles, whose last puzzle appeared in the New York Times in August, died early Thursday, Jan. 29. Mrs. Gordon, a Philadelphia native who lived her last years in a Center City assisted-living community, started creating crosswords at age 35 as a young widow, home evenings with two small sons and needing something to engage her mind. She was rejected repeatedly at first. "My child," her mother scolded, "if you would spend as much time on cookbooks instead of crosswords, your family would be happier.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eternal rest can't be too far off - Bernice Gordon is 100 - but for two nights recently, she didn't sleep. Didn't even get into bed. The primary reason was a crossword puzzle she was constructing for the Los Angeles Times. And there was the Australian Open tennis tournament as well. Bernice, who lives at Atria Center City, an assisted living community, in an apartment overlooking Logan Square, has been creating crossword puzzles since she was a young widow, home evenings with two small sons and needing something to engage her mind.
NEWS
December 22, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred candles for the crossword puzzle! One hundred cheers! The crossword, which has delighted, stimulated, exhausted, and frustrated millions of men and women, turns 100 years old Saturday. To commemorate, we thought we'd ask - how does the mind of a crossword maker work? We picked the brain of one of the country's better-known puzzle-masters, Merl Reagle, whose Sunday crossword is syndicated in more than 50 newspapers, including The Inquirer. His new book is titled, aptl;y enough, Merl Reagle's 100th Anniversary Crossword Book (Puzzleworks, 80 pages, $12.95)
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday's crossword puzzle in the New York Times spans 83 years of Philadelphia talent. The puzzle, celebrating age difference, was cowritten by Philadelphia resident Bernice Gordon, 99, and Philadelphia-born, California-raised David Steinberg, 16. Gordon is the oldest person to publish a crossword in the Times; Steinberg, the fourth-youngest. Steinberg stumbled across Gordon's puzzles as he worked on digitizing Times crosswords from before 1993, when Will Shortz became crossword editor.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  John Joseph Scanlan, 77, of Philadelphia, an addiction counselor and crossword puzzle whiz, died Saturday, March 2, at Jeanes Hospital of complications from pneumonia. For 25 years, Mr. Scanlan worked as a certified addiction counselor. His own history with addiction prompted a lifelong crusade to help others in their recovery, his family said. This was his passion and his gift, his family said, describing him as someone who "took no prisoners in his approach toward recovery.
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