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FOOD
October 28, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: My family likes to put seasoned croutons on soups and salads, but they're expensive. How can I make my own? - Mrs. E.K. Croutons are easy and inexpensive to make, and they're a great way to use up leftover or stale bread. Just cut the bread into cubes of the desired size, then spread onto a cookie sheet. Bake the bread cubes - just to dry them - in a slow, 140-degree oven for 20 to 30 minutes until golden, very crisp and very dry. Store in a tightly-covered container.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2011
Pinch of salt Garlic clove 4 whole anchovies 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder 2 dashes Worcestershire sauce Egg yolk from coddled egg 1/2 cup olive oil Half lemon, squeezed 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar Half head of romaine lettuce, cut into one-inch pieces Croutons Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Cracked pepper Put the salt in the bottom of a wooden salad bowl. Add garlic and crush, then add anchovies and mustard powder and continue to crush into fine texture.
FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 6 to 8 servings For the croutons 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cups rustic bread, cut into 1-inch cubes Salt and freshly ground black pepper For the chicken 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, pounded to 3/4-inch 1 teaspoon olive oil For the dressing 2 garlic cloves 2 anchovies Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/2 teaspoon Worcester- shire sauce 1 egg, coddled (see note) 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 3 heads romaine let- tuce, outer leaves discarded, inner leaves washed and dried 2 ounces Parmesan cheese, shaved with a vegetable peeler 1. To make the croutons: Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
FOOD
February 9, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
No matter how delicious a Caesar salad is, chilly temperatures tend to be a turnoff for things leafy and green. So I decided to tinker with the basics of this classic, bulking it up with roasted cubes of butternut squash. Add some freshly made croutons and it's a perfect vegetarian dinner.   Butternut Caesar Salad Makes 4 servings For the squash: 20-ounces peeled and cubed butternut squash 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and ground black pepper For the croutons: 10 ounces rustic bread, cut into croutons (about 4 cups)
FOOD
May 24, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Valerie Erwin greeted us warmly when we arrived at her Geechee Girl Rice Cafe in Mount Airy: "Hello, hello! Welcome!" she said. After reading about the cooking lessons at St. Martin de Porres school, chef Erwin invited the girls to dinner at her restaurant. And she got right down to business, hanging coats, stashing handbags, and instructing the girls to tie back their hair before ushering us into the kitchen. "Are we working?" Kayla Reid asked. "I don't know, we'll see," I said.
FOOD
February 9, 1994 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Good advice for Valentine's Day: Keep your love alive! That means no artery-clogging, blood-sugar-raising, hypertension-inducing meals. By avoiding excess fat, sugar and salt, our Slim Gourmet Valentine Treats cost fewer calories . . . no "love handles" as the price to pay! HEARTY STUFFED SOLE 2 pounds fillet of sole 1 1/2 cups shredded carrots 1/2 cup chopped onion 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 4 1/2 cups homemade croutons (see note) 1 tablespoon parmesan cheese 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme Optional: lemon pepper to taste 2 tablespoons dry white wine (or lemon juice)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013
Q: I eat salads nearly every day, and sometimes twice a day, yet I have not been able to lose a pound. What am I doing wrong? - Ms. Salad Bar A: A lot of people with good intentions eat salads, believing that they are eating "diet" food. Most of the time, nothing could be further from the truth. Most commercial salads we buy in restaurants or takeout joints should be called "BIG FAT SALADS"! The average commercial salad has double - sometimes triple - the 550 calories in a Big Mac. Now, don't shoot the messenger, but do hold the high-calorie dressings, cheese, croutons, bacon bits and breaded fried-chicken slices if you want to slash calories on that salad.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
If you've taken a fancy to fish, fancy fish dishes needn't be calorie-rich. These restaurant-style specialties are only a calorie-wise fraction of what they could be if they were made with butter and cream. And we've streamlined the preparation as well as the calorie count. STUFFED SOLE 2 pounds fillet of sole 1 1/2 cups shredded carrots 1/2 cup chopped onion 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 4 1/2 cups homemade bread croutons (see note) 1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme Salt or garlic salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons lemon juice or dry white wine 2 tablespoons salad oil 3 tablespoons herb-seasoned bread crumbs NOTE: To make croutons, toast whole-wheat bread lightly, then cut into cubes.
FOOD
August 9, 2012
You say gazpacho, I say salmorejo . . . On the hunt for gazpacho, we spotted something called salmorejo on the lunch menu at Garces Trading Company. Listed as "chilled tomato soup, with egg yolk and Serrano ham," it sounded a lot like the original item. Turns out, it's a richer, smoother version with a velvety texture, and a soft-pink blush. Chef Gregg Ciprioni takes care to add the sherry vinegar just before serving, to avoid gazpacho's worst flaw - an overly-tangy pucker brought on by dousing it with vinegar too early, before the flavors marry.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Derby's Wheel Pump Inn seemingly has been around forever, a popular family restaurant with modest food, affordable prices and semi-friendly service. A Montgomery County landmark since the early 1700s, the inn has become a popular family gathering place on Sundays or special occasions. The Erdenheim restaurant has earned fame since the 1981 installation of an enormous 17th century-style painting of plump, cavorting nudes, spotlighted between massive oak Corinthian columns behind a marvelous Victorian second- floor bar. The downstairs dining rooms for the most part are serviceable but lackluster.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 24, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Valerie Erwin greeted us warmly when we arrived at her Geechee Girl Rice Cafe in Mount Airy: "Hello, hello! Welcome!" she said. After reading about the cooking lessons at St. Martin de Porres school, chef Erwin invited the girls to dinner at her restaurant. And she got right down to business, hanging coats, stashing handbags, and instructing the girls to tie back their hair before ushering us into the kitchen. "Are we working?" Kayla Reid asked. "I don't know, we'll see," I said.
FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 6 to 8 servings For the croutons 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cups rustic bread, cut into 1-inch cubes Salt and freshly ground black pepper For the chicken 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, pounded to 3/4-inch 1 teaspoon olive oil For the dressing 2 garlic cloves 2 anchovies Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/2 teaspoon Worcester- shire sauce 1 egg, coddled (see note) 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 3 heads romaine let- tuce, outer leaves discarded, inner leaves washed and dried 2 ounces Parmesan cheese, shaved with a vegetable peeler 1. To make the croutons: Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013
Q: I eat salads nearly every day, and sometimes twice a day, yet I have not been able to lose a pound. What am I doing wrong? - Ms. Salad Bar A: A lot of people with good intentions eat salads, believing that they are eating "diet" food. Most of the time, nothing could be further from the truth. Most commercial salads we buy in restaurants or takeout joints should be called "BIG FAT SALADS"! The average commercial salad has double - sometimes triple - the 550 calories in a Big Mac. Now, don't shoot the messenger, but do hold the high-calorie dressings, cheese, croutons, bacon bits and breaded fried-chicken slices if you want to slash calories on that salad.
FOOD
August 9, 2012
You say gazpacho, I say salmorejo . . . On the hunt for gazpacho, we spotted something called salmorejo on the lunch menu at Garces Trading Company. Listed as "chilled tomato soup, with egg yolk and Serrano ham," it sounded a lot like the original item. Turns out, it's a richer, smoother version with a velvety texture, and a soft-pink blush. Chef Gregg Ciprioni takes care to add the sherry vinegar just before serving, to avoid gazpacho's worst flaw - an overly-tangy pucker brought on by dousing it with vinegar too early, before the flavors marry.
FOOD
February 9, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
No matter how delicious a Caesar salad is, chilly temperatures tend to be a turnoff for things leafy and green. So I decided to tinker with the basics of this classic, bulking it up with roasted cubes of butternut squash. Add some freshly made croutons and it's a perfect vegetarian dinner.   Butternut Caesar Salad Makes 4 servings For the squash: 20-ounces peeled and cubed butternut squash 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and ground black pepper For the croutons: 10 ounces rustic bread, cut into croutons (about 4 cups)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2011
Pinch of salt Garlic clove 4 whole anchovies 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder 2 dashes Worcestershire sauce Egg yolk from coddled egg 1/2 cup olive oil Half lemon, squeezed 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar Half head of romaine lettuce, cut into one-inch pieces Croutons Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Cracked pepper Put the salt in the bottom of a wooden salad bowl. Add garlic and crush, then add anchovies and mustard powder and continue to crush into fine texture.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
New restaurants often attract huge crowds as soon as they open, but few can match the astonishing response to Vinny Testa's, the terrific new Italian American restaurant in the Wynnewood Square shopping center. Although open only since July 1, this first regional branch of a successful Boston chain is drawing such huge crowds that a nightly 90-minute wait for a table is normal. The reason is understandable, for the restaurant offers mountains of tasty, reasonably priced southern Italian dishes presented in a grandiose, beautifully decorated dining room that used to be a movie house.
FOOD
November 2, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
There's no explanation on the menu for how Peacock on the Parkway got its name. An artist's rendering of a regal, tail-flaunting bird dominates the pretty, tri-level dining room, but the name could also refer to the vivid, showy vegetables that brighten many dishes in this otherwise understated space on the city's broadest boulevard. The menu is Mediterranean, borrowing from France, Italy, Spain, Turkey and northern Africa. It's an enticing read, once you get over the sticker shock: at dinner, appetizers and salads are $6.75-$9.
FOOD
February 13, 1994 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
A storm-caused roof leak had snuffed the lights in our greenhouse dining room at the London Grill in the Art Museum area. For romantic purposes, the candlelit coziness would have been divine. For reviewing, however, the lack of light made certain aspects of the job devilishly difficult. Darkness didn't dim our delight in the flavors of this exceptional restaurant's food, however. Dinner pleasures began with one of the restaurant's good deals, a three- appetizer sampler offered at a bargain price of $9. One of the appetizers was a sliver of smoky-delicious salmon terrine layered with wasabi and caviar.
FOOD
February 9, 1994 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Good advice for Valentine's Day: Keep your love alive! That means no artery-clogging, blood-sugar-raising, hypertension-inducing meals. By avoiding excess fat, sugar and salt, our Slim Gourmet Valentine Treats cost fewer calories . . . no "love handles" as the price to pay! HEARTY STUFFED SOLE 2 pounds fillet of sole 1 1/2 cups shredded carrots 1/2 cup chopped onion 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 4 1/2 cups homemade croutons (see note) 1 tablespoon parmesan cheese 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme Optional: lemon pepper to taste 2 tablespoons dry white wine (or lemon juice)
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