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Crown Prince

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NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The house that Mickey Mouse built just became the multinational of Mickey and the two Michaels. Mickey, 67, is the short one with the big tail. Michael Eisner, 53, is the tall one (6-foot-4) with the big ears. Michael Ovitz, 48, is, as ever, the one in the middle, of medium height (5- foot-9) and medium cool. Widely perceived as the most powerful man in Hollywood, Ovitz has played many roles during his 26 years in the business. He is the meteor who worked his way through UCLA in the late '60s as a Universal Studios tour guide and in 1990 brokered Matsushita's billion-dollar buyout of MCA/Universal.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE BUFFALO are gone, the beating drums replaced by tree branches colliding in the winter wind, and on a frigid afternoon last month a wide, metal gate blocked the entrance to what was once South Jersey's only Native-American reservation. Beyond the gate, down a snow-covered road, the Powhatan Renape Nation's museum sat empty, its artifacts in storage. Deeper in the forest, two-pronged deer tracks led to the late Chief Roy Crazy Horse's rancher, built illegally atop a bluff overlooking Rancocas Creek, birds now fluttering in and out of its chimney and broken windows.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | Daily News wire services
TEMBISA, S. AFRICA AT LEAST 30 IN ZULU RAMPAGE Zulus rampaged through a township with guns blazing, leaving at least 30 blacks dead in one of the country's worst massacres, police said yesterday. The Saturday-night slaughter in the Tembisa township, about 12 miles east of Johannesburg, was particularly brutal even in a nation where mass killings have become routine. Many residents had fled the area by early yesterday, but the evidence of the battle remained: blood-stained streets, burned-out cars on the roadside and many houses with broken windows and smashed doors.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Gray Vining, 97, a Philadelphia Quaker who taught English and the concepts of Western democracy to the future Emperor Akihito of Japan after World War II, died in her sleep Saturday at Kendal at Longwood, a Quaker retirement home in Kennett Square. Mrs. Vining also taught history and described the outstanding personalities of the West to the then-crown prince, who was 12 when she began tutoring him. As a commoner, she recounted, she encouraged him to think for himself and turn to members outside the imperial family for friendships.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Like a Greek tragedy (incest! infidelity! betrayal!) with Cecil B. DeMille crowd scenes (armies of thousands!), and a Technicolor color chart, Curse of the Golden Flower is a dazzling costume epic, a spectacle for the eyes and for the soul. Where the great Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou's previous epics - his surprise U.S. hit Hero, and House of Flying Daggers - turned on dazzlingly constructed martial-arts set pieces, Curse of the Golden Flower offers flying ninjas and bloodied battalions trooping forth, but also, weirdly and wonderfully, has the rhythmic energy, elan and sensuality of a vintage Hollywood musical.
NEWS
August 3, 2005 | Thomas W. Lippman
Thomas W. Lippman is an adjunct scholar at the Middle East Institute The death of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia has brought forth reassuring words from Riyadh of a smooth transition to the new monarch, Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, and stability in the kingdom. The kingdom does indeed appear stable now as the terrorism of the past two years has subsided, but in a very few years, the succession issue could become potentially destabilizing. After Abdullah and his half-brother Sultan (the defense minister who now becomes crown prince)
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Sunday marks the end of Oktoberfest, the 16-day Munich beer-drinking celebration that honors the 19th-century marriage of some Bavarian crown prince. The fest is a sanctioned citywide event in which the government encourages its citizens (and tourists) to consume mass quantities of excellent lagers served by large-busted women. They shut down schools, close offices and run naked through the streets. You know, America sure could use something like that - something to loosen our tight-butted, humorless, who-stole-the-dream, millennium-fearing, downsized psyches.
SPORTS
November 5, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Arizona men's basketball coach Lute Olson is taking a leave of absence for unspecified personal reasons. In a statement issued by his public relations firm yesterday, the 73-year-old Hall of Famer said the matter was not health-related, but the specific reason was not given. Assistant coach Kevin O'Neill will assume Olson's duties in his absence. Olson has a 780-280 record in 34 seasons as a major college coach. Former Connecticut star Diana Taurasi scored 26 points to lead the U.S. national team to an 83-72 exhibition victory over No. 1 Tennessee in Knoxville.
SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | by Bill Conlin, Daily News Sports Columnist
Japanese venerate their ancestors and communicate with them often, symbolically, through prayer and actual conversation, So, what do you say to a dearly departed father when you've just set your nation afire with its first Olympic gold medal since 1972 and only the fourth that Great Nihon has won in Winter Games history? You need some eloquent words ready for the occasion, right? Hiroyasu Shimizu, whose tea-died hairstyle and infectious grin led the front page of every shinbun from the Sakhalin Islands to Okinawa, flashed to an Olympic-record 35.59 victory in the 500-meter speedskating sprint yesterday.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
There was a clown in the state Senate yesterday. No, no. A real one. Max Patkin, the "Clown Prince of Baseball," brought his array of funny faces and stories from minor league stadiums to the Senate, where he was honored with a proclamation praising - what else - his "buffoonery. " "Oh, I think he'll fit right in," Senate President Pro Tempore Robert C. Jubelirer (R., Blair) said about a clown appearing in the chamber. Patkin's sponsor and long-time pal, Sen. Frank A. Salvatore (R., Phila.
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NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE BUFFALO are gone, the beating drums replaced by tree branches colliding in the winter wind, and on a frigid afternoon last month a wide, metal gate blocked the entrance to what was once South Jersey's only Native-American reservation. Beyond the gate, down a snow-covered road, the Powhatan Renape Nation's museum sat empty, its artifacts in storage. Deeper in the forest, two-pronged deer tracks led to the late Chief Roy Crazy Horse's rancher, built illegally atop a bluff overlooking Rancocas Creek, birds now fluttering in and out of its chimney and broken windows.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Abdullah al-Shihri and Brian Murphy, Associated Press
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - For the second time in less than a year, Saudi Arabia was thrown into the process of naming a new heir to its 88-year-old king after the death Saturday of Crown Prince Nayef bin Abdul-Aziz. That forces a potentially pivotal decision: Whether to bring a younger generation a step closer to ruling one of the West's most critical Middle East allies. King Abdullah has now outlived two designated successors, despite ailments of his own. It's widely expected that the current succession order will stand and Nayef's brother, Defense Minister Prince Salman - another elderly and ailing son of the country's founding monarch - will become the heir to the throne of OPEC's top producer.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | Associated Press
BERLIN - Otto von Habsburg saw the crumbling of the empire that his family had ruled for centuries and emerged from its ashes as a champion of a united and democratic Europe. The oldest son of Austria-Hungary's last emperor fought Nazism and Soviet communism during his long decades of exile from his homeland, and was lionized by leaders across the continent as "a great European. " Habsburg died yesterday at age 98 in his villa in Poecking in southern Germany, where he had lived since the 1950s.
SPORTS
November 5, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Arizona men's basketball coach Lute Olson is taking a leave of absence for unspecified personal reasons. In a statement issued by his public relations firm yesterday, the 73-year-old Hall of Famer said the matter was not health-related, but the specific reason was not given. Assistant coach Kevin O'Neill will assume Olson's duties in his absence. Olson has a 780-280 record in 34 seasons as a major college coach. Former Connecticut star Diana Taurasi scored 26 points to lead the U.S. national team to an 83-72 exhibition victory over No. 1 Tennessee in Knoxville.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Like a Greek tragedy (incest! infidelity! betrayal!) with Cecil B. DeMille crowd scenes (armies of thousands!), and a Technicolor color chart, Curse of the Golden Flower is a dazzling costume epic, a spectacle for the eyes and for the soul. Where the great Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou's previous epics - his surprise U.S. hit Hero, and House of Flying Daggers - turned on dazzlingly constructed martial-arts set pieces, Curse of the Golden Flower offers flying ninjas and bloodied battalions trooping forth, but also, weirdly and wonderfully, has the rhythmic energy, elan and sensuality of a vintage Hollywood musical.
NEWS
December 11, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Crown prince of snark David Sedaris' humor - as anyone who reads his magazine articles or listens to him on NPR knows - is unusual: His trick is to make you laugh even though you're appalled or annoyed. This pair of one-acts has become the holiday season's alternative staple: If you can't sit through A Christmas Carol again, there's bound to be some theater company offering these two long monologues. Flashpoint Theatre Company reprises its 2005 production. The first half of the program features Mrs. Dunbar composing her Season's Greetings letter, recounting with ladylike poise and elegant sangfroid the shocking events that laid "the heavy hand of sorrow and tribulation" on the Dunbar family.
NEWS
August 3, 2005 | Thomas W. Lippman
Thomas W. Lippman is an adjunct scholar at the Middle East Institute The death of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia has brought forth reassuring words from Riyadh of a smooth transition to the new monarch, Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, and stability in the kingdom. The kingdom does indeed appear stable now as the terrorism of the past two years has subsided, but in a very few years, the succession issue could become potentially destabilizing. After Abdullah and his half-brother Sultan (the defense minister who now becomes crown prince)
NEWS
March 9, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is the Mideast you haven't seen on the evening news lately. There are no suicide bombers. No anti-U.S. protests. No grinding poverty. No mass arrests. Instead there are Silicon Valley-style office campuses, home to the likes of Microsoft, Oracle and Cisco. And white-sand beaches packed with bikini-wearing European tourists. There are also plans for the future - well-financed plans. A world-class medical complex with a Harvard-run teaching hospital. A $7 billion theme park twice the size of Walt Disney World.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rest of us may have trouble decoding the mixed message from our government - the one that goes, "Be afraid. Be very afraid. And have a nice day!" But Larry King gets it. The suspendered talkmeister, whose Larry King Live (weeknights at 9 on CNN) is cable's most-watched show, recently created a news-and-music formula that reflects the spirit of an incoherent time. It seems that nothing caps an hour's discussion of anthrax, bombing raids, or terrorist training camps like a song.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Gray Vining, 97, a Philadelphia Quaker who taught English and the concepts of Western democracy to the future Emperor Akihito of Japan after World War II, died in her sleep Saturday at Kendal at Longwood, a Quaker retirement home in Kennett Square. Mrs. Vining also taught history and described the outstanding personalities of the West to the then-crown prince, who was 12 when she began tutoring him. As a commoner, she recounted, she encouraged him to think for himself and turn to members outside the imperial family for friendships.
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