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NEWS
February 12, 2006 | By Si Liberman FOR THE INQUIRER
What are the chances of being hit with gastroenteritis, also known as Norwalk flu, on a cruise - and how qualified and equipped are ship doctors to help you? Good questions, considering that in recent years, some vessels have reported outbreaks of the disease. Actually, the chance of getting the Norwalk virus, which typically causes vomiting and diarrhea over a period of one to three days, may not be any greater than contracting it at any crowded and enclosed environment. It's not found only on cruise ships.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
You climb aboard the luxurious Queen Elizabeth 2 for a 95-day cruise around the world to get away from it all and how do you spend your time? Watching Tom Brokaw on the tube with the NBC Nightly News. A new company based in Northvale, N.J., begins a test today of a special satellite-delivered television service on the Cunard Lines ship's annual around-the-world trip. The company hopes eventually to deliver news, sports and business programs to dozens of cruise ships. "People do want to keep up on the news," said William F. Kaiser, vice president of marketing for the Shipboard Satellite Network Inc., which also will deliver ESPN's Sports Center, Entertainment Tonight and the PBS Nightly Business Report.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1990 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on the quay at Penn's Landing, it's easy to see why some people envision Philadelphia as one of the nation's prettiest, most active passenger- cruise ports. Although it's too early for any ships to dock yet, two white behemoths, the Meridian and the Regent Star, will make Penn's Landing their home port for 14 cruises this spring and summer. Other ships will be tied up at the dock in the fall for a day at a time while passengers tour the city. Anchored alongside the Great Plaza, the vessels will make a festive addition to the waterfront as vacationers embarking on a cruise shower confetti on thousands of family and friends lining the Delaware River to see them off. But the makeshift facilities at Penn's Landing can't handle both the Meridian and Regent Star at once.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
In the months after Sept. 11, cruise lines adjusted itineraries to account for the new travel atmosphere, anticipating that passengers would want to avoid trouble areas. That shift is reflected in the latest figures on where international cruise lines are sending ships this year. Here are the top cruise regions and the share of overall cruise capacity - measured in "cruise bed days" - they'll be getting in 2002, according to an analysis by the Cruise Lines International Association, to which most of the biggest cruise companies belong.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Frances Shemanski, FOR THE INQUIRER
The cruise offerings for this year's fall and winter season includes an increasing number of itineraries to increasingly exotic destinations. Antarctic sailings are among the most popular for adventure-seeking cruisers, while new routes to ports of call in southeast Asia and Africa are attracting experienced cruise passengers who've covered most of the traditional cruising grounds. The Caribbean, the Panama Canal, the Mexican Riviera and South America continue to draw the major share of ships and passengers during the fall and winter cruise season.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1997 | By Tom Belden and Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cruising is one of the fastest-growing segments of the travel business, and Philadelphia city and port officials are working on a plan to capitalize on its popularity. For an investment of $3 million to $5 million, a historic portion of the Philadelphia Navy Base could be transformed into a bustling terminal for cruise ships, according to a study commissioned by port and city agencies. The study estimated that an attractive facility, using a vacant Navy building erected in 1874 plus the shipyard's nearby Pier 2, both situated at the foot of Broad Street, could serve more than 30,000 passengers a year.
NEWS
October 7, 2007 | By John Hilferty FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine that you're a medieval soldier, and you're about to storm Rheinfels Castle, a massive stone fortress towering over the historic German town of St. Goar on the Rhine River. As you float beneath the towers and parapets on a 400-foot-long ship, it's easy to picture such an assault. But then you remember that you're really headed to the Compass Rose Restaurant for a dinner of Cornish game hen with blackberry sauce and tiramisu, and that you'll be going to sleep in a comfortable bed while your river cruise ship slides through the Bavarian countryside.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After seven years of environmental roadblocks, Thomas J. Holt Sr. yesterday closed a deal that will let his family turn the waterfront's most contaminated eyesore into a modern seaport terminal. Standing in front of a rusted tangle of pipes and decaying tanks that was once the Publicker distillery north of the Walt Whitman Bridge, Holt said that as soon he can obtain permits, he will demolish the factory, which has been an environmental Superfund cleanup site since a 1987 fire.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | By John Maxtone-Graham, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ships are creatures of the sea. They and all their occupants flourish under way rather than dawdling at a hot pier. Better than moseying from one Caribbean or Mexican port to another is the exhilaration of setting out across an ocean. There was a time when this was commonplace - the only way people crossed oceans. Today, the charm of that era of crossings can be recaptured. It's called a repositioning voyage. For the cruise industry, October and April are the most restless months.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1998 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Naval Shipyard's Building 3 today is a cold, drafty, 125-year-old abandoned machine shop that just may be hiding a heart of gold. The once-humming industrial building practically oozes architectural character from beneath the peeling paint on its walls. And it doesn't take much imagination to envision the warmth and good cheer that should flow from the cavernous structure this spring, when it's to become this region's first terminal dedicated to cruise ships. The building sits between the Naval Shipyard's Pier 2, where the cruise ships would tie up, and the foot of South Broad Street.
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TRAVEL
May 4, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - We climbed gingerly down onto the narrow float of the seaplane that we had ridden in for a soft landing on Lake George, 45 miles northeast of downtown Anchorage. Just off to our right was the soaring Colony Glacier, its craggy azure surface providing a launch pad for polar winds blowing out to greet us. As we balanced on the float, the sound of gunshots echoed through the valley. At least that's what we thought they were, until we watched Humvee-sized blocks of ice calving off the glacier and landing spectacularly in the lake, sending giant plumes of water into the air. Just another day in Alaska, the vaunted "last frontier.
TRAVEL
March 1, 2015 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
  Lee Wachtstetter, an 86-year-old Florida widow, took her daughter's advice. She sold her five bedroom Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-area home on 10 acres and became a permanent luxury cruise ship resident after her husband died. Mama Lee, as she's known aboard the 11-year-old Crystal Serenity, has been living on the luxe 1,070-passenger vessel longer than most of its 655 crew members - nearly seven years. "My husband introduced me to cruising," she recalled. "Mason was a banker and real estate appraiser and taught me to love cruising.
TRAVEL
June 15, 2014 | By Fred Beckley, For The Inquirer
I've probably done worse things to our kids than drag them through innumerable ruins - Greek, Roman, Mayan, etc. - but we have been to a lot of ruins. If it was built and fell down, we'll make a detour; if it was built, fell down, buried, and dug up again, we'll book a room. Owing to their proximity to margaritas and warm beaches, we've been to a lot of big-ticket Mayan ruins in particular (Tikal, Tulum, Chichen Itza, Caracol). On a recent cruise, though, we stopped at Costa Maya, Mexico, and discovered, by circumstance and somewhat by accident, a new favorite.
TRAVEL
October 7, 2013 | By Peter Mandel, For The Inquirer
You can keep your inland towns that rise up over farms or crouch beside a busy river. Give me a city that turns its face to the sea. I like looking out at urban skylines from the deck of a ship. From here, at penthouse height, and out of the tangle of crowds and avenues, you get an almost map-clear view of how a port is shaped. So when I read about a Crystal Cruise ship that left from Venice, nosed into the Aegean and Black Seas, and ended up in Istanbul, I started imagining myself peering down at ancient capitals of trade like a king atop his sailable throne.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
WHEN FLAMES devoured a chunk of West Philadelphia like hell on Earth on May 13, 1985, anyone who was looking for a symbol of hope amid the horror saw Michael Moses Ward. He was just 13 then, and was called Birdie Africa. And he was one of only two people who emerged alive - albeit naked and badly burned - after police dropped a satchel of explosives onto 6221 Osage Ave., a rowhouse that had been the focal point of a nightmarish 12-hour standoff between cops and members of the radical group MOVE.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
GIGLIO, Italy - Salvage crews are working against time to remove the shipwrecked Costa Concordia cruise ship, which is steadily being crushed under its own weight on its granite seabed off the Tuscan island of Giglio. Officials said Monday that if this attempt fails, there won't be a second chance. Nick Sloane, the leader of the operation, said the Concordia has compressed about 10 feet since it came to rest on the rocks Jan. 13, 2012, after ramming a jagged reef during a publicity stunt allegedly ordered by the captain; 32 people were killed.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Gregory Katz, Associated Press
LONDON - A glowing Kate Middleton on Thursday christened a gigantic new cruise ship named the Royal Princess. Palace officials said it is planned as her final solo public appearance before she is expected to give birth in mid-July. The Duchess of Cambridge, as she has been formally known since her marriage two years ago to Prince William, used a 4-gallon, $1,500 bottle of Moet and Chandon Champagne to do the job - it was so heavy she couldn't swing it herself, but she cut a ribbon that launched the bottle toward the hull, where it smashed as crowds cheered.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Ben Nuckols, Associated Press
LINTHICUM, Md. - Passengers whose cruise vacations were cut short by a fire onboard the Grandeur of the Seas arrived back home Tuesday on charter flights from the Bahamas, many praising the crew's response and some already planning their next sailings. Photos of the Royal Caribbean ship show a large area of the stern charred on several decks. Rebecca Killinger of Carlisle said she had no idea how extensive the fire was until the ship got into dock in Freeport, Bahamas. That's in part because of the crew's calm, orderly response, she said.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2013 | By George Hobica, AIRFAREWATCHDOG.COM
Larry Pimentel has seen a lot of water under the bridge. Literally and figuratively. As past chief executive officer of Seabourn, Sea Dream Yacht Club, and Cunard, the veteran travel industry exec has steered some of the most storied names in cruising. So when Royal Caribbean Cruises lured him out of retirement in 2009 to head its new Azamara Club Cruises brand, he demanded carte blanche to create something the cruise industry hadn't seen before. And he has. How is Azamara different?
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Judy Fitzpatrick, Associated Press
PHILIPSBURG, St. Maarten - Passengers from the cruise ship Carnival Dream headed to the airport Thursday instead of sailing home after a generator problem halted their trip in the latest maintenance headache for the world's largest cruise line. The Dream was in St. Maarten on the final stop of a Caribbean cruise when the crew announced it would not be sailing home to Port Canaveral, Fla., because of a mechanical issue with a diesel generator, passengers said. Carnival Cruise Lines said the problem with the backup emergency diesel generator was discovered during a test Wednesday.
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