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Cuban American

NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the heart of Little Havana, sipping Cuban coffee under the awning of the Versailles Restaurant, Manny Perez announced his choice for president with a wave of his hand. He pointed across the street, where a Kerry/Edwards office has established a beachhead in this heavily Republican section of Miami. "I'm Republican, and I'm Cuban, and I'm voting for Kerry. I'm very unusual," said Perez, 46, a sales manager for Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. In 2000, President Bush captured about 82 percent of the approximately 400,000 Cuban American votes cast in Florida.
NEWS
October 3, 2004 | By Nancy Phillips and Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The judge who approved the FBI's electronic surveillance in the City Hall corruption investigation, including the bug in Mayor Street's office, is a Republican who has served a dozen years on the bench and was the first Cuban American to become a federal judge. U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno, 59, was appointed by President George H.W. Bush in 1992 with the support of Pennsylvania's Republican U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter. Legal motions by defense lawyers only recently disclosed that Robreno was the judge who approved the wiretaps underpinning the government's cases against 19 defendants in two indictments alleging corruption, as well as a third indictment accusing five people of ripping off a taxpayer-paid adult-education program.
NEWS
September 12, 2003 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fidel Castro was never a fan of casinos, but that did not stop the Tropicana Casino Resort from putting him and his cigar on a billboard touting its new Havana-themed expansion. Nor, apparently, did the fact that the Cuban dictator is reviled in the Cuban American community. Now, 44 years after Castro's followers pillaged casinos in Havana on New Year's Day, including the old Tropicana nightclub, the Cuban dictator is again causing trouble for a gambling joint. Yesterday, responding to incensed Cuban Americans from New Jersey to Miami, Tropicana officials said they would alter the two peach-colored billboards that feature the likeness of Castro, cigar smoke rising around him and the words "The next revolution.
NEWS
April 21, 2003 | By Jan C. Ting
I spent spring break in Cuba with students and faculty colleagues. It was a beautiful, uneasy visit. The Cuban government says it welcomes American tourists. But since 1961 the U.S. government has tried to restrict visits by Americans to Cuba, to deprive its government of U.S. dollars. It's illegal for U.S. citizens to visit Cuba without a license (which we fortunately had) from the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the U.S. Treasury Department. Cuba is a fabulous destination for tourists and visitors - but not so nice for the people who have to live there all the time.
NEWS
May 17, 2002 | By Trudy Rubin
For four decades the United States has been trying to force Fidel Castro from power with an economic embargo. We all know how well that's worked. Yet, a decade after the fall of the Soviet Union, President Bush still stands by this Cold War relic. Next week he will announce plans to tighten the embargo and crack down on tens of thousands of Americans who travel illegally to Cuba. A tighter embargo is supposed to help Cubans gain their freedom. Nothing has better exposed the sham of our Cuba policy than Jimmy Carter's visit to Havana this week.
NEWS
September 11, 2001
Leonard Pitts says Miami has "it" as a multicultural city, but the town is not mature enough yet to benefit (Inquirer, Aug. 25). The reason for the urban immaturity, he claims, is the sudden transfer of the Latin Grammys to Los Angeles because Miami could not guarantee the safety of some of the artists. I would like to offer an explanation. The Latin Grammys would have welcomed Cuban artists from the island itself and regaled them with awards. To the Cuban exile community in Miami, that is tantamount to having your current wife throw a birthday party in your house for your former wife - and then asking the poor woman to enjoy it. There are some deeply felt things that identify the character of ethnic groups and define their ethnic boundaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2001 | The New York Post, USA Today and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
MAYBE PROFESSIONAL celeb Anne Heche was a milkmaid in a previous life. That might explain how she's able to squeeze all the fame out of her 15-minute allotment. ABC has "revealed" some deliciously bizarre nuggets from Heche's "20/20" interview with Barbara Walters, which airs tonight on Channel 6. The actress had two personalities until last year when she became sane, apparently. "I had a fantasy world that I escaped to. I called my other personality Celestia," says Heche, who's promoting her upcoming memoir, "Call Me Crazy.
SPORTS
April 3, 2001 | By Chris Morkides INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chris Calciano took the West Chester University baseball head coaching job in July with his eyes wide open. He knew that the Golden Rams were coming off an 11-38 season. He knew that West Chester had won a grand total of 22 games in three years. He knew that the recruiting window was practically shut because of the late hire. The Eastern College graduate, who had served as an assistant at Drexel for five years, also knew something else. "For your first head coaching job, you're not going to get something where the team is coming off three straight championships," Calciano said.
SPORTS
March 23, 2001 | By Chris Morkides INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chris Calciano took the West Chester University baseball head coaching job in July with his eyes wide open. He knew that the Golden Rams were coming off an 11-38 season. He knew that West Chester had won a grand total of 22 games in three years. He knew that the recruiting window was practically shut because of the late hire. The Eastern College graduate, who had served as an assistant at Drexel for five years, also knew something else. "For your first head coaching job, you're not going to get something where the team is coming off three straight championships," Calciano said.
NEWS
April 27, 2000
Plenty of heat, no lightening up Out of town for a few months, I see some things haven't changed. The Phillies still stink, Allen Iverson still generates controversy and the Daily News still shills for the Clinton administration. The Daily News and Sandy Grady were gushing platitudes for the Gestapo-like grab of Elian from his Miami relatives. The editorial (April 24) made it seem like a blow for parenthood and the rule of law. The raid was no-knock, typically used only for dangerous drug dealers, not a family with a kid. What triggered this raw display of tyranny?
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