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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Perez Family opens with mambo music and a camera-glide down a beach strewn with stuff - so much stuff that it's soon apparent we're watching somebody's dream. There are balls and chairs, bow-tied waiters and potted palms. There are cabanas and classical busts perched on pillars. There are bicycles and prams. There's a vintage automobile with fins like a giant red shark's. There are men dressed in black-tie and women in white gowns wading zombie-like into the water. You get the feeling that Mira Nair, the director, told the prop guys to throw whatever, and whomever, onto the sand.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does a Cuban look like? That's what Fernando Boyd finds himself wondering nowadays whenever he passes a man wearing the uniform of the Panamanian Defense Forces. "Some people say if you see a soldier with a mustache and longer hair, it must be a Cuban because the regular Guardia wouldn't allow it," said Boyd, a leader in the Civic Crusade group opposing the regime of PDF strongman, Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega. "But I keep staring at them, and frankly, I can't tell if they're Cuban or not. Many of them look like Panamanians, anyway.
SPORTS
May 3, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Cuba's national baseball team headed to Baltimore yesterday, getting an airport send-off from Cuban leader Fidel Castro. After sorting out visa problems that delayed the flight from Havana, the team boarded a charter about 5 p.m. EDT for tonight's exhibition game with the Orioles. However, the delay meant the Cubans had to cancel their workout yesterday at Camden Yards and a reception in the team's honor. The visa problems, concerning some in the delegation of more than 300, were resolved Saturday night.
NEWS
August 19, 2005 | Kathleen Parker
Kathleen Parker is a columnist for the Orlando Sentinel Ask 1,000 people when President George W. Bush's birthday is, and 999 probably will shrug. Ask 1,000 Cubans when President Fidel Castro's birthday is, and most likely 999 will know. Just one of the small and delightful differences between a free country and a communist dictatorship. On Saturday, while Bush and a small group of journalists took a 17-mile mountain bike ride on the President's Texas ranch, Castro celebrated his 79th birthday to the usual state-mandated fanfare.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Juan Zamorano, Associated Press
METETI, Panama - Led by smugglers armed with knives and machetes, Mayra Reyes and 14 other Cubans sloshed through swamps and rivers and suffered hordes of mosquitoes as they struggled across the Darien Gap between Panama and Colombia, the only north-south stretch of the Americas to defy road-builders. After walking for three days, the group reached the foot of a steep, scrubby mountain. There, the smugglers peeled away and told the Cubans they would have to press ahead alone. "I thought I was going to have a heart attack," the hairdresser from Havana told the Associated Press.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Traveling outside Cuba for the first time, Armando Lorenzo Munnet was moved to tears Wednesday by the warm welcome he received at the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum, an astonishing array of world-famous race cars on exhibit near Philadelphia International Airport. Munnet, 42, a resourceful car mechanic, is one of the stars of Havana Motor Club, a documentary about drag racing in Cuba that had its world premiere in New York City last week. "Already, I am overwhelmed," said Munnet, who pointed to the hairs bristling on his forearm as he entered the hangar-like building where dozens of champion cars, dating back a century, are on permanent display.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning after he thought he would die, Alexi Herrera made it to America. Paddling 120 miles from Cuba, Herrera arrived yesterday in Florida waters, crowded with his brother, cousin and friend onto a haphazard raft made of no more than two tractor-tire inner tubes and two patches of canvas. The four men pushed off from their poverty-stricken homeland at 2 a.m. Sunday. After four days of rowing without even a compass, as sharks circled and the sun baked and their food sank and their hope vanished, the weary men became the most recent arrivals in a new wave of Cuban boat refugees.
NEWS
April 27, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Blas Roca Calderio, 78, a leading theoretician of the Cuban revolution and one-time head of Cuba's Communist Party, has died in Havana, the official Cuban news agency Prensa Latina reported. Mr. Roca died Saturday after a long struggle with cancer. Yesterday, thousands of Cubans poured into the Plaza de la Revolucion, where his body lay in state inside a monument to Cuban independence fighter Jose Marti. About 200,000 people - 10 percent of Havana's population - were expected to pass through the plaza before ceremonies, televised live through the day, ended late yesterday.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Andrea Rodriguez, Associated Press
HAVANA - Cuban authorities said Tuesday that they would begin offering public Internet access at more than 100 cyber-salons across the island, though home Web service would remain greatly restricted. Starting next Tuesday, people can sign up with state telecom Etecsa for temporary or permanent accounts to use one of the 118 centers, according to a measure enacted with its publication in the government's Official Gazette. Until now, the Internet has been limited to places such as tourist hotels that charge $8 an hour for creaky WiFi, foreign-run companies, and some sectors of Cuban business and government.
NEWS
September 13, 1988 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Comunista! Comunista!" Marta Cunzio, a clothing factory worker, let out a piercing, acrimonious scream yesterday at the corner of Bergenline Avenue and 48th Street in this Cuban enclave of Hudson County, just minutes before the arrival of George Bush, her choice for president. With dozens of other Cuban-Americans, she screamed at about 20 supporters of Democratic presidential nominee Michael S. Dukakis, who, with anti- Republican signs and a little bitterness of their own, were attempting to disrupt the harmony of a Bush rally.
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SPORTS
July 24, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
MARK CUBAN is still trying to get over losing DeAndre Jordan to the Clippers. Last month, the Mavericks owner publicly announced that the 6-11 free-agent center had agreed - verbally - to sign with Dallas. But then Jordan changed his mind and re-signed with the Clippers. The incident embarrassed Cuban who, in addition to not getting Jordan, was hit with a $25,000 fine from the NBA for commenting on the deal before the signing deadline. Yesterday, Cuban discussed the matter with ESPN radio's Colin Cowherd.
SPORTS
July 10, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
MARK CUBAN had a bad week. On Tuesday, the Mavericks owner was fined $25,000 for prematurely announcing free-agent DeAndre Jordan had agreed to a four-year deal worth an excess of $80 million. Yesterday, the Clippers announced they had re-signed Jordan to a four-year deal reportedly worth $88 million. That came one day after Clippers coach Doc Rivers and several players showed up at Jordan's Houston home and convinced the center to remain with the team. According to ESPN's Chris Broussard, Cuban was also in Houston on Wednesday.
SPORTS
July 3, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Benny Looper, the Phillies' assistant general manager in charge of player personnel, tells an interesting story from his younger days about a solid major-league player he once scouted but could not sign. Danny Doyle, the late Boston Red Sox scout who signed Roger Clemens, was watching the player in question and listening to Looper talk about his scouting prowess. "Son," Doyle told his fellow Oklahoman, "unless you sign 'em, it don't mean nothing. " Looper recounted that story in the midst of a conversation about how his current team has pursued some of the Cuban defectors who have signed huge big-league contracts in recent years.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a murder on the New Jersey Turnpike - stunning violence near the New Brunswick exit. Now, decades after Black Liberation Army leader Joanne Chesimard was sentenced for the 1973 killing of a state trooper, escaped prison, and surfaced in Cuba in 1984, she is first and foremost among the estimated 70 American fugitives harbored there whose apparent flouting of U.S. law is fuel for critics of recent efforts to restore U.S.-Cuba relations....
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Signe Wilkinson
"We want to see Cuba before it changes. " Simultaneously, on different continents, the brilliant Germans, Turks, Argentineans, Mexicans and other Americans staying at our Havana guest house all hatched the unique idea that they needed to get to Cuba before Starbucks, Chipotle and Urban Outfitters do. My husband Jon and I got back last week from our 11-day visit. By the time I finish this paragraph, things may have changed but despite America's new opening, we had to book our trip with a tour organizer (Australian)
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Traveling outside Cuba for the first time, Armando Lorenzo Munnet was moved to tears Wednesday by the warm welcome he received at the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum, an astonishing array of world-famous race cars on exhibit near Philadelphia International Airport. Munnet, 42, a resourceful car mechanic, is one of the stars of Havana Motor Club, a documentary about drag racing in Cuba that had its world premiere in New York City last week. "Already, I am overwhelmed," said Munnet, who pointed to the hairs bristling on his forearm as he entered the hangar-like building where dozens of champion cars, dating back a century, are on permanent display.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Cuban community welcomed news of Pope Francis' planned visit to their homeland on his way to the United States this fall, hoping it continues thawing relations between the two nations and helps the island's residents. "It's extraordinary for a dynamic religious leader to be able to bridge the diplomatic Cold War that's been going on," said Richard Negrin, city managing director. Negrin's parents fled Cuba in 1961 and his father was later killed by Cuban terrorists after they mistook him for a communist sympathizer.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - A majority of Cuban Americans, whose opposition to the Communist regime in Cuba helped cement a 50-year U.S. trade embargo, now support normalizing trade relations between the two countries, according to a poll taken since President Obama's call for closer ties in December. The survey of 400 Cuban Americans by pollsters Bendixen & Amandi International, Miami, done in mid-March after the community had had three months to debate the new policy, showed 51 percent approved of Obama's call to end the embargo and improve trade relations, and 40 percent against.
SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Early one morning last week, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. stood on a practice field and talked about risk and reward. The topic was the international labor market, specifically the supply of impact players that had flooded into Major League Baseball from Cuba over the previous few years. The sport was buzzing with anticipation about the most recent blue-chip talent to be declared a free agent after leaving the communist island, a 19-year-old infielder named Yoan Moncada who had drawn comparisons to Robinson Cano.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Fifty-three years ago, an American-sponsored invasion of communist Cuba failed miserably, leaving more than 100 members of the Cuban-exile force known as Brigade 2506 dead and about 1,200 captured. President John F. Kennedy subsequently promised that the Brigade 2506 flag would one day be returned to a "free Havana. " America has had no more success in fulfilling that vow than in executing the Bay of Pigs invasion that prompted it. Kennedy began the embargo that provided the basis for other sanctions imposed over the years to ruin Fidel Castro's government and economy, but such efforts only strengthened Cuba's resolve against U.S. interference.
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