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August 8, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
   The custom-suit comeback - replete with cuff links, pocket squares, suspenders, and gingham-checked dress shirts - has arrived in the City of Brotherly Love. Within the last two years, three companies offering made-to-measure services hit the Philly streets: Indochino, Robbini Bespoke, and Suitsupply. Before those, Henry A. Davidsen Master Tailors & Image Consultants and Commonwealth Proper started making inroads as a new generation of tailors. And don't forget the established haberdasheries we've come to know and love - Ron Wilch Custom Tailoring and Boyds Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 5, 2015
LET'S BE clear: I am not retiring from the Daily News . Malcolm Forbes said, "Retirement kills more people than hard work ever did. " I am not suicidal. But this year's 25th edition of the Stu Bykofsky's Candidates Comedy Night will be the last. Since it has become (in the words of the Inquirer ) "a rite of city politics," its demise deserves an explanation, an epitaph. Let's start with the truism that all good things must come to an end. It is an immutable fact I cannot do it forever, and 25 years is a mark often used in retirements, not to discount the Forbes quote above.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams never liked Tyron Ali. It was a gut instinct, based on what he saw and how the lobbyist approached him at political events. "He was one of those braggadocio guys, showing money and checks," Williams said. " 'I can help you. I'm helping people.' I told him, 'No, man.' " Five Philadelphia Democrats did not share Williams' distaste and eventually were recorded on tape by Ali as they accepted cash or gifts from the lobbyist-turned-government informant, sources say. Today the roiling controversy triggered by Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane's decision to quash the undercover investigation has focused attention on the man at its center.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget weighty policy issues. Nix the strategic planning for Election Day. Or even an indelicate discussion of how much money to dole out to street workers in each ward and division. When the city's Democratic elected officials and ward leaders met with Vice President Gore at the Wyndam Franklin Plaza hotel yesterday, the mood was more fawning than feisty. Some might have expected down-and-dirty politics. What they got was the equivalent of a wedding reception, with the veep patiently posing like the proud father for 100 pictures, shaking the hands of everyone from Kensington to South Philly, and thanking the ward leaders for their hard work.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
There are two compelling reasons for attending Wiederseim Associates' Thanksgiving weekend auction, beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday. Many of the 700 lots in the sale at the Ludwig's Corner firehouse in Glenmoore will make attractive - and affordable - holiday gifts. And many of those come from one of Chester County's most famous - if ill-fated - estates: the late John E. du Pont's Foxcatcher Farm in Newtown Square. "It's a big sale for Christmas," Ted Wiederseim said this week. Wiederseim's sales have always appealed to the gentry of Chester County and their fondness for fox hunting and associated equestrian themes.
NEWS
November 6, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Veteran auctiongoers tend to treat with skepticism sales that advertise unclaimed or abandoned property, particularly when the auctioneer is on a cross-country road tour. Next weekend, however, Kerry Pae, a respected Harrisburg auctioneer, will conduct a sale of unclaimed property that is on the up-and-up: a six-year accumulation of goods being disposed of by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by order of the state treasurer, Catherine Baker Knoll. The three-day sale will liquidate more than 6,000 items, many of them jewelry and coins as well as some collectibles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1986 | By TOM SHALES, Special to the Daily News
Years ago I resolved not to make any more New Year's resolutions, since most New Year's resolutions are broken. But then, why not break that one, too? TV critics rush in where even Geraldo Rivera fears to tread. As 1987 stares us menacingly in the face - another year of life with, or in spite of, television - one shudders to contemplate what it might bring: five- hour Monday Night football games, perchance? Three stupid Joan Collins mini-series, instead of just two? Ed McMahon going door-to-door in person because he has finally run out of products to pitch on the air?
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | By Richard Cohen
Back when I was a reporter covering the Maryland General Assembly, I noticed a close vote would sometimes be preceded by a last-minute rush of gubernatorial aides bearing gifts for members of the legislature. The trinkets - often cuff links or tie clips with the governor's seal - were nothing much. But they seemed to do the trick. If I asked a particular legislator about his gift, he would invariably huff, "Do you think I would sell my vote for cuff links?" I would always say no, but I always thought yes. Why else would the governor bother?
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | BY CAL THOMAS
The newspapers have been full of ads in these weeks leading up to Father's Day. Gadgets and gimmicks compete with the usual shirts, ties, cologne and cuff links as the gifts of choice to show Dad "how much you care. " Fathers in particular (and husbands and men in general) have taken quite a licking in recent years and not all have kept on ticking. A New York Times editorial last week was titled "The Husband Vanishes" and said, "Maybe marriage, as detractors claim, has become passe.
NEWS
May 22, 1998
My Uncle Freddie worked with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin on two movies, "Four for Texas" and "Robin and the Seven Hoods. " When my uncle became terminally ill, Sinatra sent him a telegram wishing him well. No need to tell you how happy it made my uncle feel. Sinatra would remember him. My uncle willed me a pair of cuff links Sinatra gave him after completing one of the movies. On the cuff links it reads "Frank Sinatra's Cal Neva Lodge. " A few years later, I was getting married and Sinatra was playing Atlantic City.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2015
LET'S BE clear: I am not retiring from the Daily News . Malcolm Forbes said, "Retirement kills more people than hard work ever did. " I am not suicidal. But this year's 25th edition of the Stu Bykofsky's Candidates Comedy Night will be the last. Since it has become (in the words of the Inquirer ) "a rite of city politics," its demise deserves an explanation, an epitaph. Let's start with the truism that all good things must come to an end. It is an immutable fact I cannot do it forever, and 25 years is a mark often used in retirements, not to discount the Forbes quote above.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Gold has moved beyond deck-the-halls festive into the glitzy realm of must-have fashion. It's the season for gleaming flecks to sparkle on fluttering eyelids and glisten on mistletoe-ready lips. A bronzy link chain, instead of a ribbon, on tuxedo-style trousers is happy-hour sultry. And shimmering, silky pantsuits are both retro and relevant. Once civilization's most sought-after metal, gold shines brightest this year in classic yellow. But copper and rose blends, especially on sequined blouses, are trending chic, too. Unlike in decades past, however, the granddaddy of precious metals no longer feels arrogant or garish.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams never liked Tyron Ali. It was a gut instinct, based on what he saw and how the lobbyist approached him at political events. "He was one of those braggadocio guys, showing money and checks," Williams said. " 'I can help you. I'm helping people.' I told him, 'No, man.' " Five Philadelphia Democrats did not share Williams' distaste and eventually were recorded on tape by Ali as they accepted cash or gifts from the lobbyist-turned-government informant, sources say. Today the roiling controversy triggered by Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane's decision to quash the undercover investigation has focused attention on the man at its center.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
   The custom-suit comeback - replete with cuff links, pocket squares, suspenders, and gingham-checked dress shirts - has arrived in the City of Brotherly Love. Within the last two years, three companies offering made-to-measure services hit the Philly streets: Indochino, Robbini Bespoke, and Suitsupply. Before those, Henry A. Davidsen Master Tailors & Image Consultants and Commonwealth Proper started making inroads as a new generation of tailors. And don't forget the established haberdasheries we've come to know and love - Ron Wilch Custom Tailoring and Boyds Philadelphia.
SPORTS
December 3, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
"You won't hear me talking about this during the season. . . . I don't like situations to become sideshows. It's just not my style. I'll reflect and analyze afterwards, and that's what I've always done. " - Jeffrey Lurie, Aug. 30, 2012 One man's situation is another's sideshow it would seem, but after what took place Monday night in Lincoln Financial Field, the Eagles' season is officially only one bearded lady and one sword swallower from any given summer night in Wildwood.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
When I heard on Sunday that Arlen Specter had died, I sought solace in rummaging through personal remnants of our 30-year friendship. My memories span campaigns, Senate hearings, radio broadcasts, martinis, dinners, birthdays, and bat mitzvahs. They include a night in Havana when I watched him debate Fidel Castro at the dinner table, a donnybrook I dubbed "the D.A. vs. the Dictator. " And our time together is evidenced in campaign buttons, ticket stubs to Supreme Court confirmation hearings, tapes of radio broadcasts, manuscripts he wrote, and countless photographs.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
There are two compelling reasons for attending Wiederseim Associates' Thanksgiving weekend auction, beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday. Many of the 700 lots in the sale at the Ludwig's Corner firehouse in Glenmoore will make attractive - and affordable - holiday gifts. And many of those come from one of Chester County's most famous - if ill-fated - estates: the late John E. du Pont's Foxcatcher Farm in Newtown Square. "It's a big sale for Christmas," Ted Wiederseim said this week. Wiederseim's sales have always appealed to the gentry of Chester County and their fondness for fox hunting and associated equestrian themes.
NEWS
March 17, 2010 | By Gary Frisch
Have you watched an episode of your favorite product lately? As advertising has grown more pervasive, advertisers have had to get more cunning about reaching potential customers. While commercials once paid for television entertainment, the popularity of the digital video recorder and other technologies has forced entertainment to become the commercial. We can't fast-forward through advertising that's part of the show. CBS' Survivor was a TV pioneer in many ways, not least its use of product placement.
NEWS
December 28, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A half-dozen trailers rolled up to Eckenhoff Cadillac Buick Pontiac GMC in Jenkintown bright and early and wiped the lot clean of $8.4 million in inventory - Hummers, Cadillacs and all. "Load up, leave. Load up, leave. . . . " The funereal rhythm of repossession transfixed the sales guys next door at Hopkins Ford Lincoln Mercury, who watched through their showroom window as the devastating news descended on their neighbor. GMAC, the beleaguered financing arm of General Motors Corp.
NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ronald A. White's long journey from North Philadelphia street tough to influential lawyer to, finally, the central figure in the current federal probe into corruption at City Hall is over. He died of complications of pancreatic cancer yesterday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital at the age of 55. In a lengthy statement released last night, Mayor Street said: "Ron achieved up to and beyond the limits of his potential. I knew Ron for most of my public career; he has been a longtime friend and staunch supporter.
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