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Culinary Arts

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NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the culinary students at Montgomery County Community College learn the difference between fricassee and flambe, the stovetop is 25 miles away. The future chefs are taught theory in Pottstown and practice in Plymouth Meeting. But that will change next year when the culinary-arts program moves into a 15,000-square-foot headquarters in Towamencin. The college's new Culinary Arts Institute will house kitchen and classroom. Officials broke ground Friday at the future site of the Towamencin Town Square complex on Forty Foot Road and Sumneytown Pike.
FOOD
September 15, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
In the quest for knowledge of foods and flavors, instruction can take many forms. For some students in Drexel University's culinary arts program, that means studying one aspect of their chosen vocation literally from the ground up. They are currently sowing, tending and harvesting many of the vegetables that will be cooked and served in their kitchen classroom and student-run Bistro. Under the tutelage of William Woys Weaver, about 10 students each semester participate in the Kitchen Garden - otherwise known as Culinary 425 or "Weeding 101. " Through this elective course, they gain hands-on experience in organic gardening, awareness of heirloom vegetables, and appreciation for the flavors and textures that fresh and varied foods bring to the table.
NEWS
September 4, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Oooooh!" said Donald Hudson. "I think I heard it click!" said Robert Messina. "Keep going," Ron Lalusis told Messina. A steel-encased bank vault at a 200-year-old Mount Holly building now owned by Burlington County College was being cranked open by Messina, the college president. Lalusis, the hired vault-cracker extraordinaire, had arranged in recent days to have an 18-inch-wide opening drilled through the side wall. A man had just entered the hole and was working combinations at the vault's 24-bolt, foot-thick steel door from within.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The recently enacted legislation allowing the creation of charter schools has spawned five proposals that could begin to alter the face of public education in Philadelphia. One would be the ultimate consumer high school, offering medical care and social services, plus a solid academic load to city students who have been expelled or have otherwise fallen through the cracks. Another would cater specifically to drop-outs, getting them back into the classroom and at the same time giving them on-the-job training in construction.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
MAYS LANDING, N.J. — Lined up in clean chef's whites and paper toques, five teams competing Monday in Atlantic Cape Community College's Academy of Culinary Arts annual Student Iron Chef Competition — the school's version of the popular television show — were nearly breathless waiting to find out the secret ingredient. Would it be clams? Squid? Or scup, the decidedly unglamorous bottom-dwelling fish species known around here as porgie? Porgie it was. And by the end of the six-hour exercise — in which the teams of five students each were judged on communication, presentation, and other skills — about 20 dishes had emerged from the kitchens, all featuring the firm, mild-flavored white fish.
FOOD
October 2, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The needs of a generation of adults who never learned to cook at home have spawned a wealth of cooking classes around the country, a stream of televised cooking shows covering basics - How to Boil Water - to sessions with gourmet chefs. Face it, when a whole cable network is devoted to one subject, it's definitely in. But cooking classes these days serve more than educational needs. Health concerns attract many to classes focused on low-fat foods, lighter meals and vegetarian cuisine.
FOOD
September 18, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Philadelphia's focus on food and the hospitality industry goes beyond wooing hometown customers and tourists. Training service providers has become just as important. To that end, Drexel University has expanded its hospitality management program to offer culinary arts as a fully accredited, four-year degree program. It also has drafted a team of prominent chefs and restaurant people, among them such prominent foodies as "Iron Chef" Masaharu Morimoto, South Philadelphia macrobiotics diva Christina Pirello, author-food historian William Woys Weaver, and master chef Georges Perrier of Le Bec-Fin, elevating them from the food trenches to the role of adjunct professor.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BONNIE WELLER
Girl Scout cookie season is imminent, so it was a good opportunity for cooking students from three schools to compete at the Shops at Liberty Place in Philadelphia - using the cookies as a dessert ingredient. Scout Laura Martin, 12, works with Muhrjan McIvor on rosettes for a first-place Sunrise Chiffon Pie. McIvor is from JNA Institute of Culinary Arts. Desserts were prepared in advance, except for details.
FOOD
September 18, 2003 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
America's restaurants post total average sales of nearly $1.2 billion a day. The industry has grown steadily for 12 consecutive years, according to the National Restaurant Association, which forecasts sales of more than $426 billion in 2003. And now, as throughout most of the past decade, many restaurant operators report that recruiting and retaining employees is one of their biggest challenges. At the same time, chefs have become superstars, and fine dining and dining spots are trendy entertainment.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students with Burlington County Institute of Technology's culinary arts department have been cooking up delicacies for Friday night's International Food Festival to mark the high school's 50-year anniversary. Many of the school's career majors will be contributing to the event, from banners and tickets produced by the print shop to a student-produced DVD to show the variety of the school's offerings, which have grown from machine shop and office skills to choices like performing arts, entertainment technologies, and public safety and more.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
SASHEIKA DUFFUS is pleading to rehire counselors and teachers. Mayegan Brown is advocating for more administrators. Now the two 11th-graders have a chance to be heard - or read or seen - thanks to a campaign launched yesterday by Mayor Nutter called "Students Speak!" that allows students to submit a written or video essay on the need for full and fair funding in the city's public schools. "Education is about these young people," Nutter said in announcing the initiative at A. Philip Randolph Career Academy in Nicetown during a joint news conference with Superintendent William Hite and Philadelphia Federation of Teachers president Jerry Jordan.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
R ONIT TEHRANI, 26, of Overbrook Farms, is co-founder (with Edward Kraftmann, 29, of Bala Cynwyd; and Jonathan Krause, 20, of Teaneck, N.J.) of So2Speak.org, a nonprofit group that combines speech and education to empower youth. It consists of two main programs: Strive2Speak, which enhances speech fluency, and Education2Enrichment, an after-school lounge for middle- and high-school students in Bala Cynwyd. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for So2Speak? A: Edward and I started a nonprofit and wanted to reach more people because originally it was to help students with speech impediments.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
FIVE chef-on-wheels wannabes stood in a Community College of Philadelphia driveway on 18th Street near Spring Garden, listening to Josh Kim, owner of SPOT Gourmet Burgers, Steaks & Pork, preach his food-cart gospel. "I'm taking money from you and you're going to put something that I make in your mouth," Kim told them. "This is the most intricate transaction you can do, other than . . . " he said, waiting for the laugh and getting it. Kim was a recent guest lecturer in chef John Olsen's "Introduction to Food Truck Entrepreneurship" course at CCP, the first college program of its kind in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
V ARNANA "V" Beuria, 35, of Southwark, is chef/owner of Chhaya Cafe. A native of India, she earned an economics degree from Penn and a degree in culinary arts from Philly's Restaurant School. She recently moved the cafe two doors down on East Passyunk Avenue. The new location is nearly double the capacity to 60 seats, and she's adding at least three employees. Q: Why'd the biz move? A: Last year I didn't think we could survive another summer where we were. It was too tight, we got crowded and the waits became unmanageable.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the customers of family-owned DiBartolo Bakery in Collingswood, it's no secret that Al DiBartolo and pastry chef Manny Agigian are artists in aprons. Think fanciful cake sculptures, freehand buttercream blossoms, to-die-for towers of fudge and chocolate mousse. Great baking, for sure. But do these Jersey guys have what it takes to be the Next Great Baker ? Tune in next Tuesday at 9 p.m. Season Four of the TLC cooking competition show starts with 10 baking teams from around the country, including Agigian, 33, and DiBartolo, 39, a cake artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
An independent, artistic 13-year-old, Parrish loves to draw and has exhibited his creations at his school's art show. He also designed the cover page for his class' poetry booklet. His interests, however, are not limited to art; they range from extreme sports to Shakespeare. He enjoys playing football and soccer, fishing, swimming, skateboarding, biking, and bowling. He also finds time to read classic literature (including Julius Caesar ), listen to a variety of music, play videogames, talk to friends on his cellphone, and even cook.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
* The History Channel's Gary Monterosso will be the featured guest at "Beer for Babes," a ladies-only program (men can be put on a waiting list) that also will feature food and beer pairings by Chef Kevin Cronin at Atlantic City Bottle Company (648 Albany Ave., Atlantic City, 609-348-6400, acbottlecompany.com ). 2 p.m. Sunday, $30. Reservations: tara@eyesontheworld.us * Day of the Dead celebrations are in order this week. Union Taco (712 W. Girard Ave., 267-455-0445, uniontaco.com )
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TONY ALCANTARA had hopes, plans and dreams, like any normal young man of superior intellect. Unfortunately, Tony wasn't normal. He had superior intelligence, but he grew up with osteopetrosis, a rare disorder that causes the bones to harden. Over the years, he broke many bones and ultimately could get around only with crutches or in a wheelchair. But Tony Alcantara had hopes, plans and dreams that he refused to relinquish despite his gradually worsening condition. He continued to inspire everyone who knew him with his optimism and courage.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY OSCAR CASTILLO, Daily News Staff Writer castilo@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THIS WEEK'S CLOSING of Edward W. Bok Technical High School leaves students' futures clouded in uncertainty and local businesses missing a portion of their clientele. "It's horrible," said Aniyah Matthews, 17, a junior. "Everyone doesn't know where they're going. " Academy at Palumbo and Franklin Learning Center have yet to respond to Matthews' application. The lack of news leaves her anxious about where she will spend her senior year. If Matthews does not get accepted to the other schools, her plan is to attend South Philadelphia High School.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY TOM DeFELICE, For the Daily News
IN THE EARLY 1950s, the Edward W. Bok Vocational-Technical School, at 9th and Mifflin streets in South Philadelphia, was home to about 2,500 day-school pupils. It provided emergency education for thousands of Americans in the field of war production. Bok Tech taught veterans respectable trade skills, seven days a week, so they could find immediate employment, with courses ranging from 12 hours to three years. During World War II, the crew members of the U.S.S. Alaska received training as they awaited their ship at the Philadelphia Naval Base Shipyard.
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