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Culinary Arts

NEWS
September 4, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Oooooh!" said Donald Hudson. "I think I heard it click!" said Robert Messina. "Keep going," Ron Lalusis told Messina. A steel-encased bank vault at a 200-year-old Mount Holly building now owned by Burlington County College was being cranked open by Messina, the college president. Lalusis, the hired vault-cracker extraordinaire, had arranged in recent days to have an 18-inch-wide opening drilled through the side wall. A man had just entered the hole and was working combinations at the vault's 24-bolt, foot-thick steel door from within.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
If the Weinstein Brothers were still flush with Disney cash and running Miramax, the documentary Pressure Cooker would have been gobbled up and turned into a sappy feature. It happened with Small Wonders , the nonfiction portrait of a music teacher in hard-pressed Harlem schools: Presto, change-o, Music of the Heart , starring Meryl Streep. So, there's an upside to the cutbacks that have hit Hollywood - and the now-struggling Weinsteins. Audiences can discover the real uplift in a story of high school students inspired to cook - yes, cook - their way to a better future.
NEWS
May 24, 2009 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
When Andrea Cotner goes to the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts - and she's been to every one since the event started in 1967 - she takes her time. She browses the paintings and photographs, jewelry and baskets, ceramics and glassworks lining State College's South Allen Street and the roads and walkways of the picturesque Penn State campus. With her husband, Ed Galus, patiently tagging along, she checks out every booth - all 300 or so. An elegant wooden bowl might catch her eye, or gigantic welded-metal sculptures.
FOOD
January 29, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret Kuo was raised in a culture where culinary arts were regarded on a level with music and literature, with recipes treasured as works of art. Her father was a senator from Manchuria who welcomed some of China's most prominent people into his home for banquets, especially to celebrate the new year. Even after World War II, when the Communists gained power and her family emigrated to Taiwan, Kuo says, the new year was greeted with elaborate meals at which elders and ancestors were honored.
NEWS
July 28, 2008 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden's Aaron McCargo Jr. was in the right place last night at a viewing party for Food Network's finale of season four of "The Next Food Network Star. " The right place was Victor's Pub on Camden's waterfront, and McCargo, 37, was announced as the winner. He bested the two other finalists, Lisa Garza of Dallas and Adam Gertler of South Philadelphia. More than 200 friends and family members - including McCargo's wife, Kim, sons Josh, 14, and Justin, 4, and daughter Jordan, 1 -- attended the Camden party.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE For the Daily News
FOR TERRICK Dorsey, it's an escape from homelessness and life in a shelter. For Dajanee Colbert, it's probably the only way she'll ever see college. For Gloria Rentas, it means she'll be the first in her family to graduate high school. Cooking is a way out of poverty - and into a life they'd never dreamed possible - for many of the inner-city students who take culinary classes at their high schools in the Careers Through Culinary Arts Program. "I want someone who comes after me to look at my story and say, 'He was just like me, I know I can make it, too,' " said Dorsey, a soft-spoken teen who lives by himself in a Germantown shelter to avoid a life on the streets.
NEWS
January 19, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James P. Jackson Jr., 68, of West Philadelphia, whose 30-year career with the Army field artillery included two tours of combat duty during the Vietnam War, died last Saturday of cancer at St. Agnes Hospice Center. Sgt. Maj. Jackson wrote recently of his fond memories of hanging out on the corner of Third and South Streets with friends before graduating in 1962 from Benjamin Franklin High School. He immediately joined the Army and, after being promoted to drill sergeant, was sent to South Vietnam in 1968 and survived the Tet offensive.
NEWS
December 7, 2007 | By Amanda Finnegan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Friday, 8:30 a.m. The smell of spices and teriyaki fills the air in the culinary arts room at Burlington County Institute of Technology in Westampton. The dicing, frying and steaming begins in preparation for the ultimate test for high school chefs: Can they stand the heat in the kitchen when it comes to serving customers? A long day is ahead for the chefs and servers of the Panther Palate, a student-run restaurant. Every Friday evening the culinary arts school opens its doors to the community to showcase its students' work, offering a gourmet five-course meal for $30. Although the restaurant does not begin serving until 4:30 p.m., with a second seating at 6:30 p.m., chef Tim Witcher, a culinary arts teacher, and his students prep all day for the hectic dinner.
FOOD
October 4, 2007
Highlights of Philadelphia food-related programs are highlighted below. Suburban classes are listed online. Philadelphia Albertson's Cooking School, Box 27, Wynnewood. 610-649-9290 or cookline99@ aol.com ( www.albertson cookingschool.com). Behind the Scenes at Rittenhouse Hotel, lunch and tour of Le Bec-Fin's pastry kitchen, Jan. 12, 10 a.m., $75. American Swedish Historical Museum, 1900 Pattison Ave. 215-389-1776 ( www.american swedish.org). Swedish cooking class, Nov. 10. Chinatown Cooking and Tours , 215-500-9774 ( www.josephpoon .com)
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wearing red T-shirts and bearing signs, about 50 students from Youth United for Change came out yesterday in hopes that the Philadelphia School Reform Commission would hire a developer to build a new Kensington High School. They've been waiting for years. But the commission delayed action again at its meeting. Officials said they were still trying to negotiate a deal with a developer. "This is just another big disappointment," said Saeda Washington, 17, a senior who attends the Kensington School of Business, Finance and Entrepreneurship, one of three small Kensington high schools.
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