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Culinary Arts

NEWS
July 4, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The aromas aren't there yet, but the sparkling, literally "stainless" steel kitchens are enticing, primed for the unveiling next week of a new culinary-arts center in downtown Mount Holly. The $9 million center - inside a nearly 200-year-old bank building and annex - is Burlington County College's newest venture. Elizabeth Dinice, a chef whose resumé includes work at two of Philadelphia's finest hotels, is in charge. "The thing that gets me most excited is we have a demonstration theater, and we will have a restaurant right here in the middle of a thriving town where we can work with other restaurateurs," Dinice said.
FOOD
February 24, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Mike Stollenwerk offers refined takes on seafood at Little Fish in Bella Vista and Fish in Center City. So at his new pub in (appropriately) Fishtown, he will not be a fish out of water. Fathom Seafood House (200 E. Girard Ave., 267-761-9343), across from Johnny Brenda's, has that old-time corner barroom look, including a 24-seat, concrete-topped bar. The comfort-food menu includes peekytoe crab fritters, marlin tacos, tuna-noodle casserole, fries topped with crab gravy and cheese curd, lobster grilled cheese, and riffs on traditionally non-seafood classics: cod pierogis and swordfish schnitzel.
FOOD
September 30, 2010
Albertson's Cooking School, P.O. Box 27, Wynnewood. 610-649-9290 ( www.albertsoncooking school.com). Authentic Vietnamese, with chef David Boyle of Davios, at Madsen Center, 2901 Springfield Rd., Broomall. Oct. 25, 6:30-9 p.m., $45. Atlantic Cape Community College Academy of Culinary Arts, 5100 Black Horse Pike, Mays Landing, 609-343-4829 ( www.atlantic.edu/aca ). Degree programs and continuing-education classes available. Avalon Restaurant , 312 S. High St., West Chester, 610-436-6100 ( www . avalonrestaurant.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
April 6, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
How many surprises can one culinary-arts teacher and a group of her budding chefs take in one day? At last count, at least three. TV host Rachael Ray was in town yesterday to unveil a new kitchen she gifted to Frankford High teacher Wilma Stephenson, a no-nonsense instructor with a loving touch. Then there was barely a dry eye in the room when Ray announced that each student, all of whom are seniors, would receive a $5,000 scholarship from Ray's Yum-O! Foundation. "She needed it so bad," a tearful Stephenson said as she hugged a smiling Selena Brown, who accepted a certificate from Ray. Later, Ray called on fellow chef, TV personality and restaurateur Bobby Flay to christen the kitchen, and he whipped up the dish Chicken Chasseur for students.
NEWS
September 4, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Oooooh!" said Donald Hudson. "I think I heard it click!" said Robert Messina. "Keep going," Ron Lalusis told Messina. A steel-encased bank vault at a 200-year-old Mount Holly building now owned by Burlington County College was being cranked open by Messina, the college president. Lalusis, the hired vault-cracker extraordinaire, had arranged in recent days to have an 18-inch-wide opening drilled through the side wall. A man had just entered the hole and was working combinations at the vault's 24-bolt, foot-thick steel door from within.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
If the Weinstein Brothers were still flush with Disney cash and running Miramax, the documentary Pressure Cooker would have been gobbled up and turned into a sappy feature. It happened with Small Wonders , the nonfiction portrait of a music teacher in hard-pressed Harlem schools: Presto, change-o, Music of the Heart , starring Meryl Streep. So, there's an upside to the cutbacks that have hit Hollywood - and the now-struggling Weinsteins. Audiences can discover the real uplift in a story of high school students inspired to cook - yes, cook - their way to a better future.
NEWS
May 24, 2009 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
When Andrea Cotner goes to the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts - and she's been to every one since the event started in 1967 - she takes her time. She browses the paintings and photographs, jewelry and baskets, ceramics and glassworks lining State College's South Allen Street and the roads and walkways of the picturesque Penn State campus. With her husband, Ed Galus, patiently tagging along, she checks out every booth - all 300 or so. An elegant wooden bowl might catch her eye, or gigantic welded-metal sculptures.
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