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Culinary Institute

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FOOD
March 22, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
The 16 patrons seated along the counter at Cook, the exclusive demonstration kitchen near Rittenhouse Square, watch chef Sylva Senat as he places a bass fillet in a pan. A glorious aroma fills the air to the sound of sizzling. "Fish normally will curl up by the edges," Senat, the executive chef at Tashan, tells the class, each of whom has paid $175 for the evening this month. "Do you know how we keep that from happening?" Brianna Wellmon knows. In a white jacket, black apron, and black hat, Wellmon is his sous chef, both at his restaurant and for this class, working at his right elbow.
FOOD
April 22, 1992 | By Kenneth Wapner, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Once upon a time, what they taught at the Culinary Institute of America - the oldest and one of the most prestigious cooking schools in the United States - was based on a classic Continental cuisine of cream soups, cream sauces, butter, butter and more butter. This type of cooking was developed in the aristocratic households of 18th- century Europe and featured preparations as rococo as the gilded interior of the Palais Soubise. It was codified during the 19th century in the kitchens of France's great hotels and restaurants.
LIVING
May 27, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in 1976, when Emeril Lagasse enrolled at Johnson & Wales, he was just a skinny kid who liked to cook, and the young culinary arts school was little more than a riverfront warehouse filled with kitchen equipment left over from the 1964 New York World's Fair. Today, Lagasse is a superstar chef - and Johnson & Wales University is hot, too. As the only culinary school in the United States to combine pastry-making and classic French cuisine with a four-year bachelor of science degree program, it consistently places virtually all its students in jobs within weeks of graduation.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
The unofficial start of summer - Memorial Day - is not a secret date. And any restaurateur with common sense and a measure of luck will do all they can to open a new restaurant before the gates bust open at the end of May. After that, the beach crowds come fast and hungry, and with none of the patience for early errors they'd afford at a new restaurant back home. Yet, there are the slowpokes who tease us well into early July with luscious social-media pics of dishes "in the works" and promises of "opening soon" while the sight of active work crews stoke a more skeptical view.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Anthony Campeggio signed up for Marianne Wilkins' culinary arts class, he did it for the easy A. But after the very first recipe - for apple muffins - the affable youth was hooked on cooking. Three years later, Campeggio, a senior and already an award-winning cook, is on his way to chefdom. Next year he will begin a two-year program at the New-York based Culinary Institute of America, the oldest and one of the most prestigious cooking schools in the United States. But first, a nod to his humble beginnings.
FOOD
January 17, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
To visit the Sweet Note Bagels bakery, a spare, 600-square-foot manufacturing space within the old Le Bus headquarters in Manayunk, you'll have to sign a nondisclosure form, or, at least, pledge not to reveal any trade secrets. After all, a good gluten-free bagel is hard to find, and even harder to make. And Sweet Note founder Michelle MacDonald, 28, has learned from experience that plenty of people would like to get their hands on her patent-pending process. Her company, which is 15 months old and run by three women under 30, is selling 5,000 bagels a week, serving 70 restaurants and shops in five states.
NEWS
May 29, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gerald J. Scanlan Jr., 47, of Turnersville, a chef and instructor at the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College in Philadelphia for 19 years, died Sunday at home. Results of medical tests to determine the cause of death are pending. Mr. Scanlan had lifelong health problems that grew worse after stomach surgery two years ago, said a friend, Lou Epstein. After graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., Mr. Scanlan worked in restaurants at the Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino and the Trump Castle Casino Resort in Atlantic City and was chef de cuisine at the Hilton Hotel in Philadelphia and the Robin's Nest Restaurant in Mount Holly.
FOOD
August 9, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The Crowne Plaza Cherry Hill (the old Hilton) has sunk gobs into a renovation of what was Cooper's Bar & Bistro. It's now Embers Wood Fired Grill (2349 W. Marlton Pike, 856-665- 6666), and it's centered on a wood-fired grill - with a hyphen, thank you - where Culinary Institute of America-trained chef James Dings turns out American comfort food in rustic environs (cherry wood and stone). The lounge invitingly spills into the lobby. Since it's a hotel restaurant, it's open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
What to eat: Ice pops! Any of them. They're all good. The truck: Bright and striped, the Lil' Pop Shop truck is the mobile arm of Jeanne Chang's brick-and-mortar operations in West and South Philly. The truck's selection of fresh, handcrafted ice pops is seasonal and always changing. The details: We tracked the truck down at the Navy Yard and were particularly impressed by the coconut cherry lime - made with juicy cherries, not the dead, flavorless cherries you'd find in store-bought ice cream, for example.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Socorro Anaya always wanted to go to college but, with three young children, higher learning seemed a pie-in-the-sky dream. Thanks to Parents and Children Together in Learning, she attended Harcum College in Bryn Mawr. In exchange for tuition-free college credit at Harcum, Anaya, 32, volunteers 100 hours at public high schools as a reading tutor in her Kensington neighborhood. The deal helps everyone, especially parents, many of whom have trouble helping their own children with schoolwork.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
The unofficial start of summer - Memorial Day - is not a secret date. And any restaurateur with common sense and a measure of luck will do all they can to open a new restaurant before the gates bust open at the end of May. After that, the beach crowds come fast and hungry, and with none of the patience for early errors they'd afford at a new restaurant back home. Yet, there are the slowpokes who tease us well into early July with luscious social-media pics of dishes "in the works" and promises of "opening soon" while the sight of active work crews stoke a more skeptical view.
FOOD
November 26, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Back in the swim Mike Stollenwerk, one of Philly's most visible seafood chefs before stepping out of the scene nearly two years ago, is back with 26 North BYOB (26 N. Third St., 267-239-5900). With the revived Bistro 7 down the street - where Michael O'Halloran has gone for romance with a renovation of his 11-year-old dinner-only, French BYOB - this is an intriguing time for the slice of Old City north of Market. At 26 North, the Jersey Shore-bred Stollenwerk (Little Fish, Fish)
NEWS
April 3, 2015
"VEGAN is going mainstream," blared an article on the food-trends site Food Navigator, noting that the number of references to "vegan" on social media rival those of "Coca-Cola," and citing study numbers on vegan eating's growing appeal to a "much larger base of consumers" beyond hard-core vegans. So, it's no wonder that still more animal-free products are hitting shelves (last week saw the debut of ready-made vegan "scrambled eggs"), and that plant-based offerings are showing up just about everywhere, flooding into the nooks and crannies of our culture.
FOOD
February 6, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a few years, Tim Lanza led a double life: as a student at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, and a cook at Marigold Kitchen, West Philadelphia's laboratory of modernist cooking. By the time he'd worked his way up from garde-manger to sous chef, school felt redundant. "I was learning so much at Marigold: molecular gastronomy, gels and foams," he said. "Then, I'd be sitting in a class where we're learning how to make omelets correctly. " So, he dropped out. Then, he got a real education.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Carlos Meekins, 75, sat down to rest in the lobby of South Camden's Neighborhood Center, a heavy bag of groceries at his feet. "My wife's dead and gone," the Riverview Towers tenant said. "I'm going to try and cook the turkey myself. " A retired roofer's helper ("I was a kettle man for 25 years"), Meekins is among nearly 3,000 Camden residents for whom Thanksgiving might not happen this year without the center. The faith-based nonprofit helped about 200 senior citizens and 500 five-member families fill bags with donated groceries and fresh food Tuesday.
FOOD
October 3, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Chops - the steak house that started in Bala Cynwyd and expanded to Washington Square before shuttering last year - is back in business. Alex Plotkin's brand occupies the former Table 31 at the Comcast Center at 17th and JFK Boulevard. Chops' outdoor operation on the plaza in front of the Comcast Center opened in the spring. Eimer Design redid Chops' two-story bar area, opening it up to the outside windows on the 17th Street side and adding a gas fireplace. The dining room is more colorful.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
What can make food more enjoyable for the elderly? There's more to food than taste. Many residential facilities for older people are putting more emphasis on the experience of eating. For one thing, they make the food look good. Kendal-Crosslands in southern Chester County bought bright-colored dishes that contrast with the food so elderly eyes can see it better. "We eat with our eyes," said Elizabeth Kautz, a registered dietitian there. Socializing itself encourages people to eat more, she said.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food can be one of those unexpected flash points of late life. Grandma may say she's never hungry or that the only things that taste good are salty foods such as French fries. Grandpa may lose control over his sweet tooth, living on Tastykakes and ice cream. The rest of the family worries that poor nutrition will make their elders' already tenuous health even worse and hasten death. So, in frustration and fear, they chide or tempt loved ones to change their habits. Often, they learn what stubborn means.
FOOD
February 28, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Vetri venturing up Things are looking up at Vetri - Marc Vetri and Jeff Benjamin's tiny flagship restaurant at 1312 Spruce St. It is expanding upstairs, taking over the apartment that for decades has benefited from the aromas that wafted up not only from Vetri but from such gems as predecessors Two Quails, Le Bec-Fin, Chanterelles, and Ciboulette. The opening, pegged for May, will also mean Sunday dinner at Vetri, something that the restaurant has not offered in its 15-plus years.
FOOD
January 17, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
To visit the Sweet Note Bagels bakery, a spare, 600-square-foot manufacturing space within the old Le Bus headquarters in Manayunk, you'll have to sign a nondisclosure form, or, at least, pledge not to reveal any trade secrets. After all, a good gluten-free bagel is hard to find, and even harder to make. And Sweet Note founder Michelle MacDonald, 28, has learned from experience that plenty of people would like to get their hands on her patent-pending process. Her company, which is 15 months old and run by three women under 30, is selling 5,000 bagels a week, serving 70 restaurants and shops in five states.
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