CollectionsCulinary School
IN THE NEWS

Culinary School

ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In late August 2007, Renee and three girlfriends were enjoying a night out in Old City. At 32º, Renee's pal Christie spotted a male friend who was with another guy Christie didn't know. That guy was Danny. The guys and girls joined forces, and about 1:30 a.m., they headed for Zee Bar. Danny said everyone could fit into his double-cab truck. Renee was the last to board. She only had one foot inside when the truck started moving. Renee screamed and yanked her foot out, miraculously getting both feet out of the way of the big tires just in time.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
FOOD
April 12, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At five restaurants in the area, a meal has to make the grade. Literally. They are restaurants operated by culinary and hospitality schools, at which students plan menus with an eye toward costs, wait tables in regulation dining rooms, cook in state-of-the-art kitchens overseen by scolding, betoqued chef-instructors, and wash dishes - trying their best not to break too many. The clientele are parents, family and friends as well as seekers of adventure and a bargain. Top freight is $50 a head for the ambitious wine-pairing dinners at the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill's "Great Chefs" room; most dinners at the schools are about $20, and lunches are under $10 - in sum, about half of what a commercial establishment would charge.
FOOD
September 18, 2003 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Cooking schools and classes, like so many aspects of America's troubled economy, are in flux. Among the culinary teachers manning the stoves, some seem to be doing well. A few have closed their doors - sometimes temporarily and for a variety of reasons - and still others are changing their approach. They are finding new ways to attract and hold students, especially two key segments of the population - older, often retired people looking to improve neglected cooking skills or socialize, and young marrieds who never learned to cook, often because their parents didn't cook, either.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
FOOD
October 4, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Besides what culinary schools are offering this fall, restaurants, kitchen stores, and even supermarkets are offering cooking classes on topics ranging from the yummy (cupcakes) to the sensible (healthy eating). Local food bloggers are getting in on the action by passing their niche expertise on to students, at both regional venues and in-home events. Also of note is a new Rittenhouse spot called Cook, where students get to interact with their favorite chefs, while getting fed.   Teaspoons & Petals is a blog that was founded by Alexis Siemons in 2008.
FOOD
August 18, 2011
This palm-sized peeler has three rotating blades, so with a flick of your wrist, you can julienne carrots or create fancy zucchini ribbons that would make a culinary school instructor proud.   - Ashley Primis Joseph Joseph Rotary Peeler, $12 at Sur La Table, the Promenade, 500 Route 73 S., Marlton, 856-797-0098, and King of Prussia Mall, 484-612-0040, josephjoseph.com.
NEWS
June 3, 2010
Camden activists desperate to save a former Sears building from destruction are calling for a boycott of Campbell Soup. About a dozen of them, from the group Camden United Inc., gathered Wednesday in the Sears parking lot to urge supporters to stop buying Campbell's soups and other products. Campbell, which wants to develop an office park around its headquarters, says developers are balking at working on the project as long as the 83-year-old Sears building is standing on it. The owner of the building, which has not had any businesses in it for several years, is pushing a plan to turn it into a restaurant-equipment distribution center and culinary school.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contact staff writer Susan Snyder at 215-854-4693 or ssnyder@phillynews.com
Kensington High School's enrollment will not reach as high as a student group had feared, the district's interim chief academic officer told students yesterday. The promise came during a meeting, held after students staged two separate rallies to urge the Philadelphia School District to keep three small high schools at Kensington and create two more at Olney. Members of Youth United for Change protested the district's intention to increase the size of three smaller high schools operating at what used to be Kensington High.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cristina Martinez arrives at work at 4 a.m., ties a white apron high across her chest, and starts preparing a lamb cooked in vapor for 10 hours. An hour later, she and her husband, Ben Miller, open their South Philadelphia restaurant, Barbacoa, serving premium tacos - and hefty sides of activism - in their bid to mobilize restaurateurs on behalf of the many undocumented immigrants who work in America's kitchens. Hosting organizational meetings and screening documentaries, the couple hope to spark a culinary crusade in a city famous for its restaurant scene - and pressure the deadlocked Congress to overhaul the immigration laws.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|