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Culinary School

FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
FOOD
October 4, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Besides what culinary schools are offering this fall, restaurants, kitchen stores, and even supermarkets are offering cooking classes on topics ranging from the yummy (cupcakes) to the sensible (healthy eating). Local food bloggers are getting in on the action by passing their niche expertise on to students, at both regional venues and in-home events. Also of note is a new Rittenhouse spot called Cook, where students get to interact with their favorite chefs, while getting fed.   Teaspoons & Petals is a blog that was founded by Alexis Siemons in 2008.
FOOD
August 18, 2011
This palm-sized peeler has three rotating blades, so with a flick of your wrist, you can julienne carrots or create fancy zucchini ribbons that would make a culinary school instructor proud.   - Ashley Primis Joseph Joseph Rotary Peeler, $12 at Sur La Table, the Promenade, 500 Route 73 S., Marlton, 856-797-0098, and King of Prussia Mall, 484-612-0040, josephjoseph.com.
NEWS
June 3, 2010
Camden activists desperate to save a former Sears building from destruction are calling for a boycott of Campbell Soup. About a dozen of them, from the group Camden United Inc., gathered Wednesday in the Sears parking lot to urge supporters to stop buying Campbell's soups and other products. Campbell, which wants to develop an office park around its headquarters, says developers are balking at working on the project as long as the 83-year-old Sears building is standing on it. The owner of the building, which has not had any businesses in it for several years, is pushing a plan to turn it into a restaurant-equipment distribution center and culinary school.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contact staff writer Susan Snyder at 215-854-4693 or ssnyder@phillynews.com
Kensington High School's enrollment will not reach as high as a student group had feared, the district's interim chief academic officer told students yesterday. The promise came during a meeting, held after students staged two separate rallies to urge the Philadelphia School District to keep three small high schools at Kensington and create two more at Olney. Members of Youth United for Change protested the district's intention to increase the size of three smaller high schools operating at what used to be Kensington High.
NEWS
November 25, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Authorities yesterday identified a second woman whose body was found, along with three others, on Monday in a drainage ditch near Atlantic City. The victim was Tracy Ann Roberts, 23, whose last known address was a room on the beach block of Tennessee Avenue in the resort. Roberts died from asphyxia, and her body is believed to have been in the watery ditch from a couple of days to as long as a week, Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey Blitz said in a statement. Roberts had been designated Victim 4. She was a 5-foot-8 white female, weighing about 120 pounds, with a butterfly tattoo on the small of her back.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story of Caputo Bros. Creamery is one fermented with love. It began with a little boy from Burlington County whose bond with an Italian grandmother, who spoke little English, was through food, especially Amedea Caputo's meatballs. She used to pop them into grandson David's mouth as soon as he arrived at her Newark home. "Food was my language with her," David Caputo said, describing "a lot of smiling and cheek-pinching and then the food would come out. " Later in life, his heart would be captured by another woman, Rynn Robinson, whom Caputo, of Tabernacle, met at the Jersey Shore on Labor Day weekend 2003.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
BURLINGTON CITY A group of Asbury Park entrepreneurs who plan to launch a hip restaurant district in Burlington City are also buying homes in town. Some of them are relocating - the group's architect, a head chef at one of their bustling eateries at the Jersey Shore, and a project manager. Future plans call for a culinary school or test kitchen in the Delaware River community. The group, which calls itself simply Smith, owns and operates six trendy restaurants, mostly in Asbury Park, known as the place where Bruce Springsteen got his start and now as a popular tourist destination.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Oh!Hara's Pub & Restaurant, the waterfront restaurant whose owners sued the city on harassment charges and then closed the doors for the summer, is scheduled to reopen today under new management. Michael Burnett still owns the establishment, but he has handed over day-to-day duties to Michael O'Mara, a chef, and Michael French, a promoter. Burnett's partner, Glenn Hastings, still owns part of the business, but he has relinquished control over the restaurant. "We're reopening under new management because Glenn is working with another company and . . . I've got this other business I've been working on," Burnett said.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
WHEN THE visitors center building at LOVE Park opened in 1960, its circular shape and glass and stainless-steel construction were lauded as "ultra-modern. " Now it's ultra-old. And except for being a place where Fairmount Park rangers can take an occasional potty break, it's ultra-useless. Known as "the flying saucer" to those who love to hate it, the building's best days are long gone. Time for it to come down to earth. Literally. We're talking demolition. We're talking enhancing the the sight lines of LOVE Park and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
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