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NEWS
August 2, 1999 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
As of Friday, it will have been 2,300 days since fire and bullets took the lives of 80 people at the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. That seemingly obscure fact has some cult watchers worried that we may see another mass suicide or act of apocalyptic violence sometime this week. Hints of an impending disaster can be found at the Davidians' Web site (www.seventhseal.com). According to their "Chronology of Latter Day Events," the Davidians believe that when leader David Koresh was killed on April 19, 1993, it marked the beginning of a 2,300-day period during which the so-called sixth seal would be fulfilled.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | by JACK NOLAN
Hilary's last spring at the University of Vermont, she took us out on a fire escape to watch the sunset. It was her solitary communion with nature and she shared it with us. We never felt closer to my stepdaughter. A month later, Hilary disappeared. A single terse letter followed. Hilary assured us she was well. She had found peace and we should not worry about her. What did we do? We worried. A month later, Hilary's backpack was found by Burlington, Vt., police, and returned to us. We feared the worst - that Hilary was the victim of foul play.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The Whole Story (EMI America ) tells the whole story of Kate Bush, the British singer who has been a star in England and Europe for close to a decade - but whose following here has amounted to little more than a cult. Bush sings in a melodramatic quaver, and much of her material is lushly baroque, florid and hopelessly romantic. This is a woman, for example, who has recorded a song called "Wuthering Heights" that if anything broadens the gothic lushness of Emily Bronte's novel.
LIVING
June 21, 1987 | Inquirer staff and wire service reviews, compiled by Christopher Cornell
They're already lining up at video stores everywhere for two big releases: a gem from Woody Allen and the riotous remake of a bizarre cult film. HANNAH AND HER SISTERS (1986) (HBO/Cannon) $89.95. 106 minutes. Woody Allen is older and getting even better. He returns to Manhattan and the anxieties that attacked Annie Hall, but this is no mere recycling project. A consummate piece of filmmaking, Hannah ponders love and death and the way the fear of the latter undermines the former.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
Brett Smiley, 60, who appeared on Broadway in the original musical Oliver! in 1965 and went on to become a glam rocker and achieve cult fame, died Friday at his home in New York. While living in England, the British rock impresario Andrew Loog Oldham, who had discovered and managed the Rolling Stones, produced Mr. Smiley's "Breathlessly Brett," but it was shelved in 1974. Two Smiley-written songs, "Va Va Va Voom" and "Space Ace," were released. The album was eventually released in London in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A goofy conflation of sexploitation and soap opera, Russ Meyer's Beyond the Valley of the Dolls - showing tonight at International House as part of its cult film series - is a sex, drugs, and rock-and-roll saga that marked '60s softcore king Meyer's first foray into studio-backed moviemaking. Originally released in 1969 with an X rating, this tawdry tale of the Kelly Affair, an all-girl trio that makes it big in Hollywood and then falls apart in a storm of drugs, depravity and rampant nakedness, is a camp classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Conductor Dennis Russell Davies has compared composer Philip Glass' operatic achievements - most of them highly dependent on savvy theater designer Robert Wilson - to those of Richard Wagner. Purists may wince at the comparison but, for duration and ambitious scale and their attempts at contemporary mythmaking, an opera by Glass and Wilson does suggest a Wagnerian ethos. The artists' first collaboration, Einstein on the Beach, received its world premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York in 1976, and has become a cult classic.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | By KITTY CAPARELLA and TOM COONEY, Daily News Staff Writers
MOVE, the radical cult hardly anyone understands, was born of the friendship between a white former college teacher and a black handyman, who had only a third-grade education but a keen interest in philosophy. Vincent Leaphart, the handyman, moved into the Powelton Village apartment of Donald Glassey, the former college teacher, in January 1972, and they began to write an 800-page "Book of Principles," which outlined Leaphart's beliefs. Before the end of 1972, Leaphart was calling himself John Africa and had recruited several members for his group, which first was called the Christian Movement for Life, then Community Action Movement and, finally, MOVE.
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
This one was a New Age version of the fear-induced mass suicide orchestrated by the Rev. Jim Jones in the closing days of 1978. A voluntary shedding of "containers" by 39 uniformed "angels" bent on flying up to a UFO. The setting was a Spanish-style villa in an exclusive San Diego suburb, not a poor, violence-prone colony in the febrile jungles of Guyana. In other aspects, this was a cult self-destructing in classic style. There was the familiar, self-proclaimed messiah mesmerizing his masses with oratorical flights of fancy, cleverly disguised demands for loyalty and adoration unto death.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Two men found in a van with six dirty, bewildered children have been charged with child abuse and might belong to a "satanic" cult, a police spokesman said yesterday. And in Washington, D.C., a raid on a warehouse linked to the cult has led investigators to look into whether a child-pornography operation was being conducted. Tallahassee detectives were trying to determine the identities of the children. A couple in Washington had contacted police, saying they were the grandparents of one of the children, said Tallahassee police spokesman Scott Hunt.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 27, 2016
There is a wild-eyed look of mischief to the tousle-haired youth whose face is stamped on the rind of Chällerhocker. But that boy is the imaginary "cellar sitter" for which this cult cheese from Switzerland is named, and I could imagine looking a little loony, too, if I were locked up for 10 months of aging on a wooden shelf. The upside is that this Swiss cheese has fast become one of my favorites in the world. Cheesemaker Walter Rass at Kaserei Tufertschwil in the canton of St. Gallen created it in 2003 as a variation on classic Appenzeller (for which he is also renowned)
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Zero K By Don DeLillo Scribner. 288 pp. $28 Reviewed by John Domini Don DeLillo began his crescendo of celebrated work - one cymbal crash after another through the 1980s and '90s - with a novel that may be his quietest. The Names , from 1982, doesn't investigate a president's assassination, like Libra (1988) does; rather, it details a family breakup, reducing a tragedy to mute, scattered fragments - suited perfectly to the primary setting, an archaeological dig. So when I say the new Zero K recalls that '82 work, it's high praise.
NEWS
March 7, 2016
ISSUE | ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE Can Trump take a punch? Mitt Romney delivered an articulate, spot-on speech on the many negatives and personal liabilities of Donald Trump ("Republicans in turmoil," Friday). But did it deliver a knockout blow to Trump? No, it did not. Trump has amply displayed his biases, his misogyny, his prejudices, and his lack of policy specifics while campaigning. His supporters shrug them off, believing the man will shake things up, get things done, and "make America great again.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
Brett Smiley, 60, who appeared on Broadway in the original musical Oliver! in 1965 and went on to become a glam rocker and achieve cult fame, died Friday at his home in New York. While living in England, the British rock impresario Andrew Loog Oldham, who had discovered and managed the Rolling Stones, produced Mr. Smiley's "Breathlessly Brett," but it was shelved in 1974. Two Smiley-written songs, "Va Va Va Voom" and "Space Ace," were released. The album was eventually released in London in 2003.
SPORTS
July 19, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
When John L. Parker, Jr. self-published Once a Runner in 1978, he had a good feeling about his novel - even if traditional publishing didn't. "I had faith in the book all those years that the world of publishing just didn't understand it," he said. "I figured sooner or later somebody would see the light. " They did - after the book become a cult classic, was dubbed "the best novel ever written about running" by Runner's World, and original copies sold for hundreds of dollars on eBay.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT. Friday, Netflix. * DIG. 10 tonight, USA.   FROM "That Girl" to "Girls," single women hoping to make it in the Big Apple aren't new to TV. Single women moving to New York after 15 years living underground in a doomsday cult? You can count them on one finger. There's nothing generic about the funny (and charming) "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," whose first 13 episodes premiere tomorrow on Netflix. Ellie Kemper ("The Office") stars as Kimmy, who's been through some stuff and emerged determined not to waste her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE TITLE vehicle in "Snowpiercer" is a nuclear-powered train that chugs around the major continents of the world in a giant loop. So, to say that the folks aboard are going in circles is accurate. Doubly so: The rich folks are packed into the front, the poor are stuck back in steerage, where they eat soylent greenish protein bars and plot revolution. They want to push aside the elites, take control of the engine that makes everything run. Director Bong Joon-ho ("The Host") isn't showing a revolution, he's showing us every revolution.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
SURE, YOU COULD ESCAPE the summer heat by heading to the most over-air-conditioned multiplex you can find. But you can also check out some of the city's best repertory offerings - none of them at venues where your toes will freeze, and many screening outdoors where you can tote your own concessions in a picnic basket. Many are part of weekly series, so if you like the selection and the vibe, there's more where that came from. "Starman" and "Escape from New York," June 20. Exhumed Films honors John Carpenter with a double feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Recently, Rodney Ibarra, a graphic designer from Hammonton, N.J., created an image and posted it on social media. It was a faux screen-capture of a personality quiz asking the ever-important meta-question: "What kind of quiz are you?" The gag was almost believable, given the deluge of quizzes flooding Facebook pages and Twitter streams of late, inviting users to learn what kind of cat they'd be, what historical period they're suited to, or which Downton Abbey character they resemble.
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