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Cultural Diversity

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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Seated on chairs and stretched out on the grass, the audience of about 50 listened to the sounds of African drum music. As drums beat a steady rhythm, flags of various nations flapped in the wind and vendors sold food ranging from Vietnamese hoagies to kielbasa, from pizza to fortune cookies. "We are gathered together under one banner - a banner of humankind," said Joe Bryant, a master drummer of African music from Temple University. The occasion was the Carnival of Colors, an all-day fair of cultural diversity sponsored by the Minority Liaison Committee of the Wallingford- Swarthmore School District.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Christine Donato, Special to The Inquirer
As the number of minority students increases in Montgomery County, some parents are questioning whether the public school system is prepared for the cultural diversity and for meeting the needs of all students. Parent groups and citizen committees have formed in several districts, sometimes to fight what they call racism in their children's schools but often simply to ensure that their minority children have a voice in the system. In several districts this year, plans have been made to reform the curriculum and discipline codes and to train the faculty about how ethnic background affects learning.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The cultural diversity of Camden County will be celebrated next Sunday with an International Heritage Festival, featuring musicians and dancers representing a variety of ethnic backgrounds. The free program will begin at 2 p.m. at the Camden County Historical Society, Park Boulevard and Euclid Avenue, Camden. The Historical Society has held ethnic festivals in the past, but the festivals concentrated on only one particular group, such as the Irish, Greeks or Hispanics, said Margaret Weatherly, director of the society.
NEWS
April 27, 1986 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
Pierre Deschamps picked at his lunch, more interested in the smorgasbord of people around him. "I know about three quarters of the people in this room," he said with a smile and a hint of pride, obviously at home in the crowded restaurant for people working for NATO. Nodding first toward a table to his left, he worked his way around the room: a Danish colonel here, an Italian chauffeur over there. Across the way, an American colonel and a communications specialist from Northern Ireland.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The Pennsylvania House sent a message of displeasure to state education officials last night, passing an amendment that would strike down new academic standards for public schools. House members, after more than two hours of debate, voted 139-61 to nullify the "outcome-based education" standards adopted by the State Board of Education last month. Urging members to vote against the regulations, Rep. William F. Adolph Jr. (R., Delaware) had an acronym to share with his colleagues - KISS.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | By Marcia C. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most tourists to the city leave North Philadelphia off their itinerary. They miss the house John Coltrane lived in, the 128-year-old science museum that houses 23,000 objects, and the long-revered Freedom Theatre. In July, the North Philadelphia Partnership launches a month-long crusade to change that. The campaign, "Keeping North Philadelphia Alive," aims to highlight the area's cultural diversity and make the public aware of its educational and economic progress in recent years.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | For The Inquirer / NANCY WEGARD
At Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Mount Holly, cultural diversity is the focus of the Epiphany, or the visit of the Magi to the Christ child. Children of different ethnicities represent the Magi in the church's celebration. At yesterday's Mass, the Rev. David Adams presided, with (from left) Melissa Arriola, 15; Chester Tayag, 13; Deirdre Kinnevy, 15; Stephanie Kaiser, 15; Marion Moore, 11; and Diana Evers, 11.
NEWS
August 6, 1986
As an Olney resident I am disappointed (and embarrassed) at the hostility the business community has shown toward the Korean people who live and work here. Recently we celebrated the Fourth of July and the values this country cherishes: the freedoms written in the Constitution, hard work, free trade and high moral and civic standards. From my experience the Korean people emulate these ideals and are an asset to our community by offering us cultural diversity and commercial investment.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Haverford College astronomy professor Bruce Partridge thinks about cultural diversity in the natural sciences, he recalls the contributions of the ancient Mayan Indians to the study of the stars. Those early astronomers built elaborate observatories out of stone, developed a table to count the days of the year, and plotted solar eclipses. Partridge believes that such cultural information should be built into any liberal arts education. He is hoping that under a new curricular policy adopted by the college's faculty last month, the Quaker institution will do just that.
NEWS
September 3, 1993 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They were a talkative crowd, those casually dressed grade-school teachers who got together yesterday for the first time since school let out in June. They had been summoned for an in-service seminar. But it wasn't a routine presentation, the type that teachers endure while organizing their lesson plans. Instead, the staff was warned that they might be made uncomfortable, even embarrassed, by some of the things they would hear. This was, after all, the first districtwide cultural diversity and sensitivity training seminar held since perhaps the 1960s.
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NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Here's a foolproof recipe for understanding: Take two African American big-city education majors from Temple, combine them with two white small-town education majors from Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa, toss them all together in a dorm, blend their disparate teaching experiences, and bake for about, oh, four weeks. What you get is an invaluable appreciation for cultural diversity. That's what students who have interned at the Simpson-Temple Cultural Exchange Program have learned.
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
WOODCHOPPERTOWN, Pa. - Up here in the wooded hills of Berks County, boys are more likely to go hunting after school than play street hockey, as they might do in Essington or Secane. If they take in a ball game, it's more likely the Reading Phillies than the Philadelphia Phillies. And when they eat a big sandwich, they call it a sub, not a hoagie. They make it on a doughy soft roll, not an Italian hard roll. Culturally, rural Woodchoppertown is a world apart from the dense, twin-house neighborhoods of eastern Delaware County down by Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
IN 1996, the African-American United Fund completed the first project on the Avenue of the Arts on North Broad. The project then created new jobs and marked the beginning of the development of Avenue of the Arts, bounded by Washington to Glenwood south to north and 12th Street to 10th east to west. Since 1996, other public and private projects have emerged on the north side. The expansion of the Convention Center, completion of Freedom Theatre, the Blue Horizon and, of course, the many developments at Temple.
NEWS
November 1, 2007 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
He has gone to great lengths to shake off his once dour image, but a trip to Springfield is a step too far for British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Brown says he has no plans to follow predecessor Tony Blair in making a cameo appearance on Fox network's The Simpsons. Yeardley Smith, who provides the voice for the show's Lisa Simpson - the gifted sister of delinquent Bart - has said she believed Brown should be invited to appear. Blair recorded a voice-over for The Simpsons in 2003, starring in an episode in which the Simpson family visited Britain.
NEWS
June 5, 2007 | By Peter B. Lane
Greater Philadelphia has long had one of the most vigorous cultural scenes in the country. That cultural tradition adds to the region's vitality and allure. It fosters creativity, sparks a rich dialogue, expands the intellectual horizons of the community, and attracts people from out of town who want to share the Philadelphia experience. And, once the azaleas start to bloom, the arts, particularly the performing arts, go outdoors. The list of outdoor summer entertainment opportunities is long, starting with the granddaddy of them all, the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, now entering its fourth decade of providing people with the best in a wide variety of performance genres.
NEWS
May 13, 2007 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By week's end, the media swarm had left Cherry Hill. Birdsong punctuated the morning calm on streets such as Mimosa Drive and Tampa Avenue, where young men alleged to be the architects of a terrorist plot had until recently lived. Everyday life resumed. But among the people who shop, work or reside in this increasingly diverse and particularly suburban suburb, last week was a too-close-to-home reminder of the post-9/11 world. A world where things may not be what they seem. A precarious world where the person who drove you to the airport or fixed your roof could be a terrorist, and where a guy who works at Circuit City is a hero.
NEWS
July 24, 2005 | By Justin Goldman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsauken Alliance for the Performing Arts has provided many shows over the years and this year is putting on a show with a contemporary feel to it: the musical Grease from Friday to Aug. 6. According to its Web site, www.papashows.org, the alliance's mission is to present programs that "celebrate the cultural diversity of our community, providing an opportunity for civic involvement for young and old alike while educating our students in the many aspects of the performing arts.
NEWS
December 24, 2004
Merry Christmas. There, we said it. Let's do it again, by God: Merry Christmas. Tomorrow is the day when Western Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, whom they revere as their Redeemer and part of the divine Holy Trinity. So the Editorial Board, without apology or fear of government reprisal, offers that heartfelt salutation to all among us for whom Dec. 25 is a sacred day. What's more, those good wishes go out also to many folks who are Christian only perfunctorily, or not at all, but still celebrate the day. You see, in American culture, Christmas does double duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2003 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire sources contributed to this report
'YOU TALKIN' to me?" What else could Robert De Niro say when his doctor told him he had prostate cancer. Fortunately, De Niro's prognosis is good. "Doctors say the condition was detected at an early stage because of regular checkups," his publicist said in a statement yesterday. "Because of the early detection and his excellent physical condition, doctors project a full recovery. " De Niro will next be seen in theaters in "Godsend," a thriller about cloning. Travis Bickle to Fimmel Calvin Klein underwear model Travis Fimmel says at first, he didn't want the lead role in the WB's "Tarzan.
SPORTS
October 22, 2002 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a typical women's volleyball practice at Temple University five years ago, coach Bob Bertucci would ask players if they understood his explanation of a drill before they tried it. Two players - one from Bulgaria, the other from Albania - nodded their heads. "Good," Bertucci said. "Let's get to work. " It turned into one of his more frustrating experiences. Players did not follow his instructions, even though he explained them repeatedly, then asked constantly if they had understood.
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