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Cultural Exchange

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NEWS
May 20, 1992 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Call it a meeting of the minds. Lauren Brooke, a senior at Friends Central School thought it would "just kind of break down cultural barriers" if artists from her school got together with artists at West Philadelphia High School to work on a project. Shown with the resultant mural at West Philadelphia High are (from left) Judy Florival of West Philly, Carley Fisher of Friends, Brooke, West Philly principal Joyce Harrison, and George Wright III of West Philly. It took a week to do the mural, which was finished on April 29, the same day riots broke out in Los Angeles.
NEWS
December 5, 2004 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students at United Friends School in Quakertown are learning about rural China through e-mail and letters from about 20 Chinese students. Richard Polgar, who teaches seventh and eighth graders at United Friends, began what he called the "e-pal exchange" this fall to continue relationships with teachers and students he met during a four-week trip to China in the summer. Polgar was part of an international team of teachers who taught English in a rural middle school in the southern province of Hunan.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
In an effort to curb growing racial tension in their neighborhoood, some West Philadelphia residents are planning a daylong cultural exchange tomorrow. The six-hour event is an attempt to get black, Asian and white neighbors in a relaxed social setting to talk about the community's problems, said Police Officer Regina Missouri, who is assigned to the mini-station on 44th Street near Chestnut. Two recent incidents, which police and residents believe were racially motivated, provided the impetus for the event, Missouri said.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Last May a dancer and choreographer little known outside the dance community but dearly beloved within it died of AIDS. Now the tributes to Jeff Duncan are beginning to pour in: in New York, where he co-founded a dancers' cooperative that eventually grew into the prestigious Dance Theater Workshop; in Baltimore, where Duncan settled and taught from 1977 until his death, and last night, here at Temple University's Conwell Dance Theater. Although Duncan had no direct link with Philadelphia, the dance community here is honoring the artist by way of a cultural exchange with Baltimore.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
They were English-speaking white kids from suburban Strath Haven High School. But yesterday they ventured to inner-city Olney High to mingle with immigrant students from Haiti, Puerto Rico, Colombia, Russia, India, Korea and China. Their visit was part of a cultural exchange designed to foster friendships and help immigrant students at Olney adjust to life in the United States. "The kids want to be accepted," said Olney teacher Sharon Breslow, the event organizer. "They don't find a lot of acceptance in this school.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A contingent of law enforcement officers - including more than 15 Philadelphia police commanders - is being invited to see firsthand how the people of South Korea live, work and worship. An 11-day cultural exchange tour, tentatively scheduled for sometime in May, would take Philadelphia-area police officials to cultural sites, the Korean National Police Academy and other law enforcement agencies. Forums on law enforcement topics affecting both countries will be conducted. The trip is being paid for by the Council of the Korean Churches of Greater Philadelphia, the Council of Churches for the Law Enforcement Agencies in Korea, and the Inchon Full Gospel Church.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Foreign-exchange programs have exposed township students to European and Asian cultures. Now, a program promises to expand their world view by bringing a little piece of Africa into the classroom. Prepare International Inc., a Williamstown-based nonprofit that for five years has brought college-age students from West Africa to study in the Philadelphia area, is expanding its cultural-exchange programs to include students of all ages. A pilot program beginning in spring would use the Internet and video-conferencing to link three Monroe schools - Williamstown Middle School, Williamstown High School and Whitehall Elementary School - with a school in Cotonou in the French-speaking republic of Benin in West Africa.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
The Castro Alves Theater Ballet performs at the Drake Theater in Center City as part of the Africamericas Festival. The troupe, from the Brazilian state of Bahia, danced yesterday in the first part of a cultural exchange between Philadelphia and Brazil. Next year the festival will travel to Bahia.
NEWS
September 28, 1986
The otherwise interesting Sept. 16 report about the "cultural exchange" of Americans and Soviets in Riga, the capital of Soviet-occupied Latvia, omits the fact that in 1940 the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, on the basis of his infamous treaty of friendship with Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, occupied the three Baltic states, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. This Soviet occupation continues to this day, imposing terrible suffering and hardship upon the unfortunate three Baltic nations. The U.S. government has refused and still refuses to recognize the legitimacy of the Soviet occupation of these three, previously democratic republics.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 foreign college students who came to the United States for a cultural exchange but ended up working long hours for below minimum wage in a warehouse packaging Hershey's candy will receive back pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday. Three companies will pay $213,042 to 1,028 students who worked at the warehouse in Palmyra, Pa., between November 2009 and October 2011. The students made headlines in August 2011 when they went on strike over their situation and the complicated hiring process behind it. "I feel deeply inspired today, because our strike has had the incredible result of exposing and addressing the fundamental problems facing so many workers," Chinese student Chen Wen said in a statement from the National Guestworker Alliance, an advocacy group.
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NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifteen years ago, two Philadelphians with a shared affinity for classic cars, world affairs, and Cuba formed a quirky nonprofit that some now say was prescient. Their group, TailLight Diplomacy, sprung from the notion that the estimated 50,000, pre-1960, Detroit-built "Yanktanks" - the vintage cars still rolling in Cuba - could unite car enthusiasts from America and the island nation for groundbreaking exchanges. Founders Rick Shnitzler and John Dowlin corresponded with Cuban officials.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 foreign college students who came to the United States for a cultural exchange but ended up working long hours for below minimum wage in a warehouse packaging Hershey's candy will receive back pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday. Three companies will pay $213,042 to 1,028 students who worked at the warehouse in Palmyra, Pa., between November 2009 and October 2011. The students made headlines in August 2011 when they went on strike over their situation and the complicated hiring process behind it. "I feel deeply inspired today, because our strike has had the incredible result of exposing and addressing the fundamental problems facing so many workers," Chinese student Chen Wen said in a statement from the National Guestworker Alliance, an advocacy group.
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By Elisa Lala INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fatema Jafari, 15, of Afghanistan, had never walked around the streets of Philadelphia before this week, but she feels as though she has. She has spent hours looking into the eyes of the street vendor selling hot dogs to passersby, stared mesmerized at the mirrorlike Comcast building overlooking the city skyline, and seen American families eating birthday cake, dancing in street parades, and riding bikes. Jafari has experienced Philadelphia through photographs. She is one of 10 Afghan high school students participating in an international photography project in collaboration with 11 students from Constitution High School in Center City.
NEWS
December 5, 2004 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students at United Friends School in Quakertown are learning about rural China through e-mail and letters from about 20 Chinese students. Richard Polgar, who teaches seventh and eighth graders at United Friends, began what he called the "e-pal exchange" this fall to continue relationships with teachers and students he met during a four-week trip to China in the summer. Polgar was part of an international team of teachers who taught English in a rural middle school in the southern province of Hunan.
NEWS
April 19, 2002
I HAVE FILED two federal income tax returns for 2001, each asking for refunds. One return reflects the amount of taxes I am required to pay by law. The other return shows half the lawful amount, reflecting my unwillingness to pay for the costs of war. As a Quaker who has dedicated her life to teaching principles of nonviolence, I am sounding an ever louder voice to a deaf public. Our government is trading "eyes for eyes," "teeth for teeth" on the road to total blindness, dumbness and numbness.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Foreign-exchange programs have exposed township students to European and Asian cultures. Now, a program promises to expand their world view by bringing a little piece of Africa into the classroom. Prepare International Inc., a Williamstown-based nonprofit that for five years has brought college-age students from West Africa to study in the Philadelphia area, is expanding its cultural-exchange programs to include students of all ages. A pilot program beginning in spring would use the Internet and video-conferencing to link three Monroe schools - Williamstown Middle School, Williamstown High School and Whitehall Elementary School - with a school in Cotonou in the French-speaking republic of Benin in West Africa.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
Well! The thousands of protesters expected to descend on Philadelphia during the four-day Republican National Convention are in a quandary. Despite months of planning, these people who claim to know chapter and verse about the International Monetary Fund's sins somehow never realized that all the hotels would be booked. A cynic might note this is not an auspicious beginning for people who hope to sway Americans with the acumen of their arguments against globalization, drug companies and big business.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A sister-city arrangement between Upper Gwynedd and Pyung Chang Dong in Seoul, South Korea, will begin this month with three township officials flying to the bustling community to compare notes on municipality management. The relationship aims to promote industrial and commercial growth in both areas as well as to deepen cultural appreciation, said Township Manager Leonard Perrone. The Korean township will pay for hotel arrangements and meals for Perrone and two township commissioners during the weeklong trip, which Perrone said would focus on business opportunities, municipal planning, and traffic and land-development issues.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Elba Dormoi was a vision from the past. Her decorative dress, adorned in lace and flecks of gold and called La Pollera, was part of that vision. Dormoi, 60, a native of Panama, wears her dress when performing ancestral dances that her mother and grandmother helped choreograph to explain their folklore. "It is our tradition," Dormoi said as she adjusted her pearl-encrusted skate-fish headpiece. "Each family adds something to the dances and the costumes to show how proud we are. I have danced at many affairs to help teach our culture.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
What was it that made the au pair case America's trial du jour? It's happened before - a young girl accused of killing the child she was caring for. This case could have been no big deal. But it was a big deal. Everyone's been talking about it, in offices, at parties, over dinner tables. What made America care? Lots of things, say experts. Such as 19-year-old Louise Woodward's innocent face. And our fascination with the British, still heightened from the frenzy over Princess Diana.
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