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NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Any time you're making a comedy and you feel you need to add a goat that eats Viagra and attaches itself to someone's leg, you're probably in trouble. So it is with "Family Wedding," a culture-clash comedy about a Mexican-American girl (America Ferrera) who takes her African-American fiance (Lance Gross) home to meet the parents. In a narrative feature as fresh as "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," Gross' character is a handsome physician, Columbia-trained, and on top of that is ready to go to work for Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
April 9, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A Wedding in Ramallah, part of the "Cinema of the Muslim Worlds" program in the Philadelphia Film Festival, is a compelling culture-clash documentary in which language, love (or its absence) and gender roles collide. Bassam, a Palestinian exile working as a telephone repairman in Cleveland, heads home to the West Bank town of Ramallah - to an arranged marriage with the shy Mariam. It is the summer of 2000. Five months later, Bassam has returned, alone, to the States. Israeli soldiers are firing rockets and guns at the city, and Mariam, now living with her in-laws in cramped quarters, hunkers down in a corner, scared and lonely.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Main Line roofers say they are taking it on the chin from Amish competitors, who are getting a significant amount of work in Philadelphia's wealthy western suburbs. Keith McLean, a Paoli roofing contractor, said he lost a job this month when his bid of $8,000 was $3,000 more than the winning Amish bid. The 38 percent difference in price, McLean said, rendered him unable to compete. "My wiggle room is hundreds of dollars. I don't have three grand" to play with, said McLean, who owns Hancock Building Associates Inc. McLean and other non-Amish contractors say the Amish, who come from Lancaster County and western Chester County, have an advantage because they do not have to pay Social Security taxes for themselves or their Amish employees and are eligible for a religious exemption from workers' compensation insurance, although not all take advantage of the latter.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | by Harry Haun, New York Daily News
"My Cousin Vinny" makes the best screen use yet of "grits," the Dixie dish that has traditionally mystified visiting Yankees. Indeed, it helps lawyer Joe Pesci crack a murder case, freeing his cuz and the cuz's pal of the charges they were unlucky enough to step into while speeding through the South. But getting there is all the fun in this courtroom comedy, and the fun is centrally located in the differences between North and South. It's a comedy of illogical locality, of survival of the misfittest, of a fish-out-of-water flapping his fins to the delighted indifference of the local denizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
From slavery to apartheid, the atrocities and exploitation that European powers visited on Africa have made the continent a fertile ground for exploring the collisions of worlds and cultures. But even the most sympathetic voices that take the side of the natives have overwhelmingly done so from a white perspective. The power and originality of Wole Soyinka's Death and the King's Horseman stems from its different perspective. When worlds collide in this tragedy, we view them from deep within a very different outlook and moral landscape.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Culture Clash is a group of three comedians who aim to bring, they say, "a little taste of California" to Philadelphia during their performances at the Painted Bride Art Center. That taste of California has a decidedly Latin flavor. Ricardo Salinas, Richard Montoya and Herbert Siguenza, as their names indicate, are of Latin American ancestry, and their show is dedicated to drawing humor from the lives and culture of their fellow Hispanics. Culture Clash has made quite a reputation in California, where there is a large Latin American population.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia, meet Culture Clash. Making its local premiere at the Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine St., the Latino comedy troupe brings its cutting-edge satire to the city tonight in the form of "Coast To Coast. " "Coast to Coast" is a co-production of the Bride and the Philadelphia Theater Company. It's a collection of story excerpts from four of the 16-year-old troupe's critically acclaimed works - "Radio Mambo: Culture Clash in Miami, "Culture Clash in Bordertown," "Nuyorican Stories" and "Mission Magic Mystical Tour.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Since June 27, Agustin Tavares' American dream has turned into a nightmare, complete with community activists boycotting his Allegheny Avenue bodega and blockading the street, with the support of local politicians. Tavares and his four employees have been accused of using foul language with customers, and neighbors are circulating rumors of drug-dealing. Underlying the community strife is a clash of cultures between the African-American people who live near the store and the Spanish-speaking Tavares and his Dominican employees.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For 15 years, the comedy trio Culture Clash has been touring the country with humorous skits drawn from the experience of the Latino community. In Culture Clash: Coast to Coast, Richard Montoya, Ric Salinas and Herbert Siquenza present skits from past shows the San Francisco-based group has done about San Diego, Miami and New York. While the New York material is drawn primarily from the Puerto Rican community, the bits from San Diego and Miami embrace considerably wider swaths of population.
NEWS
December 10, 2003 | By Hugh Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
Top-billed Tom Cruise was the key to The Last Samurai's $24.3 million opening weekend. But it's Ken Watanabe, in the title role, who commands the opening scene of director Ed Zwick's $100 million historical epic. Who? Watanabe, the 44-year-old veteran of more than a dozen Japanese-language films and television productions, never before appeared in an American movie. But with Samurai, he makes one heck of an entrance. Even before the credits, he is seen as the noble 19th-century warrior Katsumoto, meditating on a mountaintop before the stormy culture clash that follows.
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NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IF POLITICS MAKES strange bedfellows, among the strangest may have been made by the 1980s U.K. politics of Margaret Thatcher, as we see in "Pride. " Some of the bedfellows, if fact, would prefer that we use a term other than bedfellows. They would be striking coal miners in Wales, who for a time found common cause with gay activists - Thatcher's rhetoric targeted both camps, as did police harassment. "Pride" is essentially a comedy, but it makes homophobia a pronounced theme - the culturally conservative miners, we see, are slow to warm to the idea of solidarity with gay activists (some never do)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, FOR THE INQUIRER
The one thing that's certain about this weekend's world premiere of Skins & Songs, a collaboration between Philadelphia's Spoken Hand Percussion Orchestra and New Yorker Philip Hamilton's a cappella vocal ensemble Voices, is that the stage at the Painted Bride will be crowded. With 22 percussionists and vocalists fusing a musical hybrid out of more than 30 cultural traditions, there's little else regarding the piece that's predictable. "What we've created is something exciting, energetic, and unique," promises Hamilton.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
YOU KNOW what stinks? My car. Last week I used it to haul two bags of Bart Blatstein's putrid trash off the empty lot he owns on the 100 block of West Allen Street in Northern Liberties. For weeks, neighbors had complained to Blatstein-run Tower Investments - owners of the adjacent Piazza at Schmidts - about overflowing Dumpsters on the lot. Scavengers routinely ripped into the garbage, which then blew down the street. The receptacles were supposed to hold only construction debris from the under-construction Arrow Swim Club across the street.
SPORTS
April 8, 2011
Royals enjoy April reign Regular observers of this space (hi, Mom !) may recall us recently suggesting that Kansas City fans might be happy to replace their squad with the equal-value option Alex Rodriguez . Perhaps the youngest and poorest team in the majors took the wisecrack as inspiration, because the Royals are 4-2 for the opening week and leading the AL Central. (You're welcome, K.C. - feel free to send some Arthur Bryant barbeque.) The Royals have already eclipsed their longest winning streak (three games)
BUSINESS
November 29, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Main Line roofers say they are taking it on the chin from Amish competitors, who are getting a significant amount of work in Philadelphia's wealthy western suburbs. Keith McLean, a Paoli roofing contractor, said he lost a job this month when his bid of $8,000 was $3,000 more than the winning Amish bid. The 38 percent difference in price, McLean said, rendered him unable to compete. "My wiggle room is hundreds of dollars. I don't have three grand" to play with, said McLean, who owns Hancock Building Associates Inc. McLean and other non-Amish contractors say the Amish, who come from Lancaster County and western Chester County, have an advantage because they do not have to pay Social Security taxes for themselves or their Amish employees and are eligible for a religious exemption from workers' compensation insurance, although not all take advantage of the latter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I am an 18-year-old woman and have been with my fiancé for 2 1/2 years. I love him and can't picture my life without him. However, over the last six months he has become emotionally abusive. He's never wrong, gets mad if I disagree with him about anything and yells at me over every little thing. He used to treat me great, and now this. I miss how it used to be, and I cry almost every day. In the past, I always told myself I would never put up with something like this, but I have been - and it gets harder every day. I know it's not physical, but emotional abuse counts for something, right?
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Any time you're making a comedy and you feel you need to add a goat that eats Viagra and attaches itself to someone's leg, you're probably in trouble. So it is with "Family Wedding," a culture-clash comedy about a Mexican-American girl (America Ferrera) who takes her African-American fiance (Lance Gross) home to meet the parents. In a narrative feature as fresh as "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," Gross' character is a handsome physician, Columbia-trained, and on top of that is ready to go to work for Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
January 23, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - The spotlight landed on Hopital Saint Francois de Sales yesterday, on a day when it was at both its best and worst. What a parade of prominent Haitians, foreign correspondents, and visiting medical experts saw at this small and badly damaged Catholic hospital was impressive - dedicated workers tending to more than 100 severely wounded victims who lie on hospital beds, cots, and mattresses in the open courtyard under the...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine if contestants on American Idol were threatened with death for shaking their booty in front of millions of viewers. That's what happens to several singers - the women, performing without burkhas or veils - in Afghan Star, a documentary about Afghanistan's hugely popular TV talent contest, a show watched by a third of the country, and condemned by fundamentalists for defying Islamic law. Havana Marking's excellent, illuminating film...
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