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Culture Club

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1998 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's 7 p.m. in Atlanta, hours before Boy George will reunite with his mates in Culture Club for their first U.S. show in 13 years, and George is gabbing about gay stereotypes in film and TV. "All you ever get is the eyeliner on the one-liner or home-furnishing stories," George says with a laugh. "No one deals with issues. You never get rounded characters. You just get men who listen to Streisand. " Dealing with issues in blunt, charming fashion is the forte of George, who plays the Mann tonight with Culture Club.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services, the New York Post and USA Today contributed to this report
"I don't play golf and I don't fish. I want to die in the office. " - "60 Minutes" producer Don Hewitt, 75, on his retirement plans Ellen DeGeneres, convinced ABC will cancel her sitcom "Ellen" after its season finale next month, should resolve to spend some of her newfound free time studying show-biz etiquette. DeGeneres recently taped a guest appearance on the NBC series "Mad About You," and reportedly left the set with everybody mad at her. The star, playing a nanny on the May 19 episode of the Paul Reiser/Helen Hunt sitcom, "forgot it wasn't her program," the New York Post reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1987 | By DAVID HINCKLEY, New York Daily News
A lot of people didn't think Boy George, the sweet-voiced pop/fashion king of 1984 who by 1986 had become a hollow-eyed heroin addict, would ever come back. And judging from "Sold," his first solo album, he knows it. "When I think about the laughter directed at me," he sings in "We've Got a Right," "I don't give a damn any more. " Divorced from Culture Club, whose hits such as "Time" and "Karma Chameleon" now seem long ago and far away, Boy George is clearly trying to carve a separate musical identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Together, they seemed to define the split personality of Britain in the 1980s: scowling, concrete-haired Margaret Thatcher and loopy, cross-dressing Boy George. Margaret Thatcher is gone from the stage. But Boy George, after years in twilight, is back. Reunited with Brit-band Culture Club - you remember "Karma Chameleon," don't you? - Boy George will play at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 5 under the rafters of the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. Not only is George back, so is '80s music.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | By DAVID HINCKLEY, New York Daily News
A lot of people didn't think Boy George, the sweet-voiced pop/fashion king of 1984 who by 1986 had become a hollow-eyed heroin addict, would ever come back. And judging from "Sold," his first solo album, he knows it. "When I think about the laughter directed at me" - he sings in "We've Got a Right" - "I don't give a damn any more. " Divorced from Culture Club, whose hits such as "Time" and "Karma Chameleon" now seem long ago and far away, Boy George is clearly trying to carve a separate musical identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE INQUIRER
Let's take it back, waaaay back. I'm talking parachute pants, leg warmers, big hair and Boy George. You do remember Boy George, the flamboyant cross-dresser who gave us "Do You Really Want to Hurt Me" and "Church of the Poison Mind"? Well, our "Karma Chameleon" is in town Thursday but, sorry to say, he won't "tumble 4 ya. " Instead, George will be behind the turntables, spinning dance music. Yes, the Culture Club frontman is now a DJ - his career before becoming an '80s pop icon.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Even in the midst of the New Romantic flurry of the mid-1980s, Culture Club stood out like something else. "One black, one Jew, one Irish transvestite and one Anglo-Saxon," to hear bass player Mikey Craig describe them, these culture clashers and club devotees offered an intriguing mix of rock and reggae, Bowie and Bolan, old-school soul and Burundi Beats, cross-dressing and romantic sincerity. Typical of many pop phenomena, Culture Club burned like a party queen, flying sky-high with hits like "Do You Really Want to Hurt Me, "Karma Chameleon," "Church of the Poison Mind" and "I'll Tumble for You. " Then they plummeted when Boy George got himself all druggy and mental, broke up with drummer/romantic partner (and lyrical inspiration)
NEWS
April 12, 1993 | by Ellis Widner, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press and Prodigy contributed to this report
QUOTE "I always liked Nancy Reagan. I thought she was sort of fragile and vulnerable and very appealing. " - Hillary Rodham Clinton NOW YOU SEE THEM . . . Kristen McMenamy is one plucky model. The Easton, Pa., native was just another pretty face on the runway until she plucked out her eyebrows. It was, McMenamy says, an act of rebellion. She also chopped off her hair. "Since I couldn't conform and look like the girl next door, I decided to go the opposite way and be a weirdo," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1986 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
A wacky episode of The A-Team and a Woody Allen movie offer light entertainment in the early evening. Later the mood turns serious, with an earnest special on reading and somber reports on terrorism and affirmative action. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS THE A-TEAM (8 p.m., Ch. 3) - Fans of Boy George and Culture Club will want to tune in to this repeat episode. Boy George stars as himself and displays a relatively macho side of his personality. He and the Culture Club also perform three songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Boy George, who plays the TLA Friday, has had his troubles with drugs, sex scandals, and jail time. Call it his Rimbaudesque season in Hell, if you will, a period he's well over and done with. Rather than a moment of self-actualization in which to break the cycle of lousiness, the Boy says, frankly, that he just had to become an adult. "I honestly had to keep telling myself over and over again to wise up until I got it," George says with a laugh. "When people talk about reinventing themselves, they're normally just talking about getting a new stylist.
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SPORTS
June 18, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
T.O. never would have made it to the driveway. Had Chip Kelly been the Eagles coach a decade ago, the egomaniacal receiver who arrived at training camp in 2005 determined to be a disruptive force would have been long gone before he had a chance to show off his six pack on the cement of his Moorestown McMansion. We have learned that much about Kelly, and the players who have stuck around for his third season have taken notice. "I'm definitely not surprised," center Jason Kelce said Tuesday when asked about Kelly's decision to release Evan Mathis before the two-time Pro Bowl left guard had a chance to join his teammates for this week's mandatory minicamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Boy George, who plays the TLA Friday, has had his troubles with drugs, sex scandals, and jail time. Call it his Rimbaudesque season in Hell, if you will, a period he's well over and done with. Rather than a moment of self-actualization in which to break the cycle of lousiness, the Boy says, frankly, that he just had to become an adult. "I honestly had to keep telling myself over and over again to wise up until I got it," George says with a laugh. "When people talk about reinventing themselves, they're normally just talking about getting a new stylist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2003 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Taboo has everything but a soul. It has Boy George in a musical story about the life of Boy George, composed, scored and partly conceived by Boy George. It has a thorough rewrite from its London original by American actor and playwright Charles Busch. It has a reported $10 million bankroll by Rosie O'Donnell, who has done genuine good deeds for Broadway, although this is not one of them. And, oh, does it have passion. If you could order passion from a menu and you wanted no accompaniments - nothing to explain it or allow you to be tantalized by it and sucked into it - then Taboo would be your perfect restaurant.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gautam Godhwani peered out a window at Club 1616, past its lacy red curtains and onto the street. "My God," he said. Roped in at the entrance to the Center City nightclub, clamoring to join the 800 people already in its smoky interior on a recent Saturday night, were college-age women in bellybutton-baring pants, high heels and sequined halter tops. They clutched cigarette packs and jostled against men in slacks and dress shirts. "I don't think I've ever seen such a scene in Bombay," said Godhwani, a King of Prussia software engineer born and raised in India.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2001 | by Jonathan Takiff Daily News Staff Writer
He was a DJ long before Culture Club ever hit the charts, says Boy George (O'Dowd). And it's in that guise that we'll see him tonight, when the Karma Chameleon hits the turntables at Shampoo (417 N. 8th Street) for a midnight spinning session. The appearance is timed to the release of his new CD "Boy George: Essential Mix" (London Sire), a fun and frothy collection of his favorite dance pop obscurities. We got him on the phone last night to discuss the show, the state of pop and and how he spent Grammy evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE INQUIRER
Let's take it back, waaaay back. I'm talking parachute pants, leg warmers, big hair and Boy George. You do remember Boy George, the flamboyant cross-dresser who gave us "Do You Really Want to Hurt Me" and "Church of the Poison Mind"? Well, our "Karma Chameleon" is in town Thursday but, sorry to say, he won't "tumble 4 ya. " Instead, George will be behind the turntables, spinning dance music. Yes, the Culture Club frontman is now a DJ - his career before becoming an '80s pop icon.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Most of the really big "shed" shows of the summer are behind us now. Yet for fans of music - as opposed to scenes - the fun is just beginning. With the coming of fall, the entertainment focus returns to the clubs and smaller theaters, where a pretty amazing array of talent has been booked. Perennial venues like TLA and the Keswick will be rocking and socking several nights a week, with the South Street club running the gamut from the ska punk of Goldfinger to blues with Joan Osborne and the satirical monologues of David Sedaris (of "This American Life" radio fame)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1998 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's 7 p.m. in Atlanta, hours before Boy George will reunite with his mates in Culture Club for their first U.S. show in 13 years, and George is gabbing about gay stereotypes in film and TV. "All you ever get is the eyeliner on the one-liner or home-furnishing stories," George says with a laugh. "No one deals with issues. You never get rounded characters. You just get men who listen to Streisand. " Dealing with issues in blunt, charming fashion is the forte of George, who plays the Mann tonight with Culture Club.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Even in the midst of the New Romantic flurry of the mid-1980s, Culture Club stood out like something else. "One black, one Jew, one Irish transvestite and one Anglo-Saxon," to hear bass player Mikey Craig describe them, these culture clashers and club devotees offered an intriguing mix of rock and reggae, Bowie and Bolan, old-school soul and Burundi Beats, cross-dressing and romantic sincerity. Typical of many pop phenomena, Culture Club burned like a party queen, flying sky-high with hits like "Do You Really Want to Hurt Me, "Karma Chameleon," "Church of the Poison Mind" and "I'll Tumble for You. " Then they plummeted when Boy George got himself all druggy and mental, broke up with drummer/romantic partner (and lyrical inspiration)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Together, they seemed to define the split personality of Britain in the 1980s: scowling, concrete-haired Margaret Thatcher and loopy, cross-dressing Boy George. Margaret Thatcher is gone from the stage. But Boy George, after years in twilight, is back. Reunited with Brit-band Culture Club - you remember "Karma Chameleon," don't you? - Boy George will play at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 5 under the rafters of the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. Not only is George back, so is '80s music.
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