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Culture Shock

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NEWS
September 15, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The bulletins from the front these days are of skirmishes between allies as well as enemies. There are reports of uneasy encounters between Saudis and Americans. Even the military is talking about what they call, in a burst of sensitivity, "a cultural clash. " The old Middle East hands on talk shows say that our differences must be handled delicately. No ideological tanks for this engagement, no Stealth bombers, just some understanding of their ways. When in Arabia, do as the Arabians.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | By John Corr INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. William Kelly was feeling restless in Vero Beach, Fla., in his fairly new church with its fairly old congregation of retirees. Something was telling him it was time to move on. That something, however, didn't tell him he would end up in a church by the side of a country road in a place called Upper Octorara, a church with lots of young families but also some worshipers whose ancestors helped found it in 1720. The Octorara Presbyterian Church created a pleasant culture shock for Mr. Kelly, 46, his wife, Annette, and their four children.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Most of the 12,000 American college-age students who study in Britain and Ireland each year are truly innocents abroad, destined for culture shock. So says Bill Griesar, who directs the West Coast office of the Beaver College Center for Education Abroad. He warns that American students will be surprised to find they can't understand their Glaswegian roommate (from Glasgow) and that a friendly smile is not a surefire icebreaker. Griesar, 27, spent 18 months living with students in Britain and Ireland to research The Underground Guide to University Study in Britain and Ireland, published in March by Intercultural Press of Yarmouth, Maine.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER ARTS WRITER
At last, Akeem Davis - one of Philadelphia's most continuously busy actors - has time off to contemplate the fact that he won the F. Otto Haas Emerging Artist Award at the Barrymore Awards this month. The 28-year-old, Miami-raised Davis has cut a wide swath through theatrical genres since arriving in Philadelphia in 2011, from Arthur Miller's All My Sons at People's Light to the title role of Henry V at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Company to the recent sold-out closing weekend of Theatre Exile's Rizzo . For once, he wasn't rehearsing the next play while finishing up the latest: He'll start work on Lobby Hero for Theatre Horizon in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of students gathered around Bri McGee, crowding in uncomfortably close, eyes wide and hands outstretched. "Oh, my God, is that really your hair?" one exclaimed. "You gotta touch it!" another cried. This study in awkward interracial dynamics was only a staged scenario, designed as a teachable moment. But McGee and others, students of color at elite college-prep schools, said it's typical of their day-to-day interactions. They were gathered in a similarly rarefied clime, the idyllic Main Line campus of Rosemont College, for an orientation run by A Better Chance, a nonprofit that helps underserved minority students access top-quality private- and public-school educations that might otherwise be out of reach.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never mind the blow that GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s decision to leave Center City has dealt Philadelphia's already vacancy-battered commercial landlords. What about the effect on the pharmaceutical company's 1,300 employees, who will move by 2012's end from a bustling downtown location to the Navy Yard? Talk about culture shock. Their new digs will be part of a tranquil, suburbanlike corporate campus along the Delaware River at the city's southern edge - the towers they now occupy on 16th Street, between Vine and Race Streets, but a speck, if that, on the distant skyline.
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Meeting with managers from several Latin American nations, a U.S. executive once linked his thumb and index finger to give the "OK" sign. He didn't know the gesture is considered obscene by the Latins. In China, visiting business executives should never discuss divorce, sex, politics or foreign policy. And in Hong Kong, a smile or laugh may convey several meanings, but not necessarily happiness or amusement. Those are some of the insights that Arco Chemical Co. has offered its employees to avoid culture shock when dealing with foreign business people here and abroad.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amir Goro lies in a private hospital room on the Rive Gauche, sipping Evian water and flipping between a soccer match and cartoons on a color television. It is the ultimate in culture shock for the 14-year-old, newly arrived from Sarajevo. Having lived for nearly three years without heat, electricity or running water, Amir is positively wallowing in the creature comforts of late 20th-century civilization. "Je m'appelle Amir," he announced proudly in nearly unaccented French - the result of just one hour with a tutor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1996 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you like your dancing hard, fast and intense, then Koresh Dance Company is for you. Koresh's new program, Culture Shock, opened last night at Drexel's Mandell Theater, with a second performance tonight. Looking for Venus, one of two premieres, showed off this company's strengths. This six-part piece (choreographed by Artistic Director Ronen Koresh, as were all four works here) tackles the familiar domain of love and relationships, but does so with hardly a shred of sentimentality.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
After a string of grisly stories about sexual harassment and sexual assaults in the military, I ran into more than a few people eager to overhaul the entire Defense Department. With only the tip of tongue in cheek, they were ready to ban heterosexual men from the Army, Navy and Air Force. Saner heads prevailed. So did open minds. Not every naval officer turned into Tailhooker at the sight of a woman. In the Persian Gulf war only a handful of men got out of hand. Anyway, it wasn't sexual orientation that was the problem.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER ARTS WRITER
At last, Akeem Davis - one of Philadelphia's most continuously busy actors - has time off to contemplate the fact that he won the F. Otto Haas Emerging Artist Award at the Barrymore Awards this month. The 28-year-old, Miami-raised Davis has cut a wide swath through theatrical genres since arriving in Philadelphia in 2011, from Arthur Miller's All My Sons at People's Light to the title role of Henry V at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Company to the recent sold-out closing weekend of Theatre Exile's Rizzo . For once, he wasn't rehearsing the next play while finishing up the latest: He'll start work on Lobby Hero for Theatre Horizon in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of students gathered around Bri McGee, crowding in uncomfortably close, eyes wide and hands outstretched. "Oh, my God, is that really your hair?" one exclaimed. "You gotta touch it!" another cried. This study in awkward interracial dynamics was only a staged scenario, designed as a teachable moment. But McGee and others, students of color at elite college-prep schools, said it's typical of their day-to-day interactions. They were gathered in a similarly rarefied clime, the idyllic Main Line campus of Rosemont College, for an orientation run by A Better Chance, a nonprofit that helps underserved minority students access top-quality private- and public-school educations that might otherwise be out of reach.
SPORTS
June 29, 2015 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
SUNRISE, Fla. - The selection of Ivan Provorov truly represents general manager Ron Hextall's stance that he was taking the best player available with the seventh overall pick in last night's first round. The farm system is lacking in forwards and Provorov is a defenseman. "He has elite hockey sense," Hextall said, "and is a real good competitor. A 200-foot player. " Some scouts considered Provorov, 18, the best blue-liner in the draft. If nothing else, he's one of the few who has been to Lincoln Financial Field for an Eagles game.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015
THIS WEEKEND we went to a bat mitzvah. For many black families, this peek into Jewish tradition is culture shock. For the Joneses? It's old hat. We've been to so many bat mitzvahs that LaVeta is starting to hum along to the tunes. Little Solomon has started checking out the young men's yarmulkes. And Eve? Well, she's 13, so she's eyeing the bat mitzvah benefits. Having been to three bat mitzvahs so far, Eve has come to understand that girls her age who become "bat mitzvah" have the same rights as adults, are morally responsible for their actions and, best of all, get lots and lots of stuff.
SPORTS
September 13, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
James Bartleson says there's a big difference between low crawling through mud in full military gear with a rifle in your hands and running around the football field in pads. He would know. His Triton High School teammate and close friend, Paul Mueller, also appreciates the difference between boot camp with the National Guard and training camp with a high school football team. But the remarkable thing about what the two squared-away seniors did this summer was their willingness and ability to embrace both: to sign up for the National Guard, endure 10 weeks of intensive training, come to celebrate the military lifestyle, and still set their sights on a successful senior season with the Mustangs.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
CHEESESTEAK impresario Tony Luke Jr. will shine the bright lights on his hometown, bringing his new reality show "Frankenfood" to Philly from Feb. 24 to 26. Luke and his co-star, NYC chef Josh Capon , will film at local restaurants. "Frankenfood," which was picked up by Spike, features amateur cooks going head-to-head to create unexpected food innovations. The winner of each episode gets $10,000 and his or her item on the menu of a local restaurant. Luke and Capon held auditions for "Frankenfood" in Philly back in November.
NEWS
July 24, 2011
With a high-profile crackdown on two city workers over free meals and scoring TVs and other goodies through dealings with Verizon and other city contractors, Mayor Nutter reminded Philadelphia voters that he meant what he said with his 2007 campaign pledge to "throw the bums out. " By firing a top technology officer, and demoting and suspending another aide, Nutter offered a case study last week on the risks of an often too-cozy relationship between...
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Established by President John F. Kennedy on March 1, 1961, barely a month after he took office, the Peace Corps has always seemed such a quintessentially '60s initiative. The volunteer program, which has sent more than 200,000 American volunteers to 139 countries over the last half-century, is as robust as ever, said organizers of Sunday's Peace Corps Around the World Expo at the National Constitution Center. "Actually, the number of volunteer applications has been going up," said Anne Baker, vice president of the National Peace Corps Association, which cosponsored the event.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never mind the blow that GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s decision to leave Center City has dealt Philadelphia's already vacancy-battered commercial landlords. What about the effect on the pharmaceutical company's 1,300 employees, who will move by 2012's end from a bustling downtown location to the Navy Yard? Talk about culture shock. Their new digs will be part of a tranquil, suburbanlike corporate campus along the Delaware River at the city's southern edge - the towers they now occupy on 16th Street, between Vine and Race Streets, but a speck, if that, on the distant skyline.
SPORTS
December 31, 2010 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
It was all about going home for Lamon Church. He was born and raised in Chester and, like budding basketball stars, recruited by a number of outside schools that like to mine the young talent in the Chester Biddy League. They couldn't miss Church. He was taller than most of the kids his age, had a good handle, and wore the "The next one . . . " tag. In Chester, that could mean a variety of previous young stars, such as Whip Cooper, Zain Shaw, Jameer Nelson or Tyreke Evans. Church and his family opted to go the Inter-Ac League route and attend Malvern Prep.
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