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Cumberland Farms

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NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Florida prosecutor said yesterday that he would not seek extradition of a former Cumberland Farms cashier who said she was falsely accused of theft by the convenience store's security officials. Shirley Wells DiSalvo, 22, of Magnolia, Del., was nine months pregnant in August when she was picked up by Delaware State Police, imprisoned for five days and threatened with extradition to face trial in a theft that allegedly occurred four years ago in Florida. At a hearing in Dover, Del., yesterday, DiSalvo, who has since given birth to a boy, was told Florida officials would not seek her extradition.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Florida prosecutor who set out to press theft charges against a Cumberland Farms cashier is now investigating whether the convenience-store chain systematically coerced confessions from employees and extorted payments of thousands of dollars. The prosecutor, Michael Rubin, assistant state attorney for Martin County, said yesterday that his office was conducting a criminal investigation to learn whether Cumberland Farms routinely brought false charges against its own employees and extorted money from them.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials of Cumberland Farms convenience stores interrogated 2,600 cashiers in one six-month period in connection with alleged employee theft, according to company records obtained by The Inquirer. Detailed reports compiled by Cumberland Farms show that from January through June 1986, the company sent out 15 officials to question cashiers. The records show that 57 percent of those questioned during that period - 1,492 people - signed "confessions. " The company collected $368,121.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1992 | ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Dianna Marder contributed to this article
Convenience-store chain Cumberland Farms Inc. filed for bankruptcy-court protection from creditors yesterday as efforts to restructure its debt fell apart. Hurt by the recession and slumping real estate values, the privately held company had been trying for several months to work out a new arrangement with its lenders, said Foster Macrides, vice president for human relations. But the restructuring fell through when the firm's biggest lender, Industrial Bank of Japan Trust Co., rejected the plan, Macrides said.
NEWS
October 6, 1990
Working for Cumberland Farms is no picnic, according to the statements of scores of former chain-store employees and several former security officials. Even the company's attorney, in trying to justify subjecting employees suspected of theft to police-style interrogations, says that the firm considers the taking of a cup of coffee as stealing. But as the Cumberland Farms' saga continues to unfold in stories written by Inquirer staff writer Dianna Marder, an even harsher picture of convenience- store policies emerges.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lance Curley still gets a burning sensation in his gut when he drives by a Cumberland Farms convenience store. Six years ago, Curley, a computer programmer who worked part time as a cashier, said he was falsely accused by Cumberland Farms of pilfering $1,300. He and a dozen other cashiers subsequently filed a class-action lawsuit against the chain in U.S. District Court in Camden. Eventually, similar suits were filed in Florida, Vermont and Massachusetts - all accusing Cumberland Farms of interrogating its cashiers with false accusations of theft, then demanding repayment.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former cashiers who said they had been falsely accused of theft have reached a $5.5 million out-of-court settlement with the Cumberland Farms convenience store chain. The settlement will be announced jointly by Cumberland Farms and attorneys for the former cashiers, Dennis Faucher, one of the plaintiffs' attorneys, said yesterday. The settlement was the result of a 1986 lawsuit against Cumberland Farms. Former cashiers said the company had falsely accused them of theft on the job, forced them to pay Cumberland Farms thousands of dollars in restitution and, in some instances, brought criminal charges against employees who refused to pay the money.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday approved a $5.5 million settlement between the Cumberland Farms convenience store chain and thousands of former cashiers who said they were falsely accused of stealing. It was a moment of triumph for Lance Curley. Seven years ago, Curley, a Haddonfield computer programmer, was falsely accused of stealing more than $1,000 from the Cumberland Farms store where he was a part-time, temporary cashier. Curley and three other cashiers sued - claiming that for years the chain had systematically accused employees of theft and then extorted thousands of dollars or brought criminal charges against employees who refused to pay. Curley's suit, filed as a class action, accused the company of extortion, fraud and racketeering.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cumberland Farms has apparently stopped interrogating employees for alleged theft, coercing them into signing confessions and forcing them to pay the company money, according to recent reports from store employees and attorneys. The employees and attorneys say that no Cumberland Farms cashiers have been interrogated or asked to sign a confession of theft since about September. The Inquirer has reported that since 1976, 30,000 Cumberland Farms employees were fired after being called in for questioning by company security officials.
NEWS
July 23, 1990
Federal prosecutors should initiate a criminal investigation into allegations that officials of the Cumberland Farms convenience stores pressured employees into confessing falsely to theft. Former employees contend that they were accused erroneously of taking everything from cups of coffee to thousands of dollars and were then pressured, under threat of prosecution, into paying the amount the company alleged. In some cases, the former employees admitted pilfering small amounts of goods, but say they were frightened into paying as much as $2,000.
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NEWS
May 11, 2004 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not often is a middle-aged woman seen hopping in public, yet there was Mary Ann Seems, bouncing on her toes yesterday in a Bucks County convenience store, her fists quivering in post-lottery fever. "This is so exciting!" exclaimed Seems, 47, of Titusville, N.J. "I don't care who it is; it's in our neighborhood!" Seems lives just across the Delaware River from Washington Crossing, where a Cumberland Farms store last week sold the richest winning lottery ticket so far in Pennsylvania history.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The old line about being a one-stoplight town doesn't quite apply here. Wenonah is one stoplight shy of the cutoff. The only red light anyone stops at in Wenonah is the glowing, backlit, pedestal sign of the One Stop Shoppe, at Mantua and West Avenues. Because usage on the site hasn't changed, it's immune to zoning laws prohibiting large or freestanding signs. In this picture-postcard town, the corner has always stood out like an unmade bed in a Marine barracks. According to residents and borough officials, the property has evolved from a gas station (the tanks are still underground)
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday approved a $5.5 million settlement between the Cumberland Farms convenience store chain and thousands of former cashiers who said they were falsely accused of stealing. It was a moment of triumph for Lance Curley. Seven years ago, Curley, a Haddonfield computer programmer, was falsely accused of stealing more than $1,000 from the Cumberland Farms store where he was a part-time, temporary cashier. Curley and three other cashiers sued - claiming that for years the chain had systematically accused employees of theft and then extorted thousands of dollars or brought criminal charges against employees who refused to pay. Curley's suit, filed as a class action, accused the company of extortion, fraud and racketeering.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former cashiers who said they had been falsely accused of theft have reached a $5.5 million out-of-court settlement with the Cumberland Farms convenience store chain. The settlement will be announced jointly by Cumberland Farms and attorneys for the former cashiers, Dennis Faucher, one of the plaintiffs' attorneys, said yesterday. The settlement was the result of a 1986 lawsuit against Cumberland Farms. Former cashiers said the company had falsely accused them of theft on the job, forced them to pay Cumberland Farms thousands of dollars in restitution and, in some instances, brought criminal charges against employees who refused to pay the money.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lance Curley still gets a burning sensation in his gut when he drives by a Cumberland Farms convenience store. Six years ago, Curley, a computer programmer who worked part time as a cashier, said he was falsely accused by Cumberland Farms of pilfering $1,300. He and a dozen other cashiers subsequently filed a class-action lawsuit against the chain in U.S. District Court in Camden. Eventually, similar suits were filed in Florida, Vermont and Massachusetts - all accusing Cumberland Farms of interrogating its cashiers with false accusations of theft, then demanding repayment.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1992 | ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Dianna Marder contributed to this article
Convenience-store chain Cumberland Farms Inc. filed for bankruptcy-court protection from creditors yesterday as efforts to restructure its debt fell apart. Hurt by the recession and slumping real estate values, the privately held company had been trying for several months to work out a new arrangement with its lenders, said Foster Macrides, vice president for human relations. But the restructuring fell through when the firm's biggest lender, Industrial Bank of Japan Trust Co., rejected the plan, Macrides said.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cumberland Farms has apparently stopped interrogating employees for alleged theft, coercing them into signing confessions and forcing them to pay the company money, according to recent reports from store employees and attorneys. The employees and attorneys say that no Cumberland Farms cashiers have been interrogated or asked to sign a confession of theft since about September. The Inquirer has reported that since 1976, 30,000 Cumberland Farms employees were fired after being called in for questioning by company security officials.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Florida prosecutor who set out to press theft charges against a Cumberland Farms cashier is now investigating whether the convenience-store chain systematically coerced confessions from employees and extorted payments of thousands of dollars. The prosecutor, Michael Rubin, assistant state attorney for Martin County, said yesterday that his office was conducting a criminal investigation to learn whether Cumberland Farms routinely brought false charges against its own employees and extorted money from them.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Florida prosecutor said yesterday that he would not seek extradition of a former Cumberland Farms cashier who said she was falsely accused of theft by the convenience store's security officials. Shirley Wells DiSalvo, 22, of Magnolia, Del., was nine months pregnant in August when she was picked up by Delaware State Police, imprisoned for five days and threatened with extradition to face trial in a theft that allegedly occurred four years ago in Florida. At a hearing in Dover, Del., yesterday, DiSalvo, who has since given birth to a boy, was told Florida officials would not seek her extradition.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attorneys for former Cumberland Farms employees have asked a federal court to declare as fact - before trial - that the company had a long-standing policy to coerce employees into signing false confessions of theft. In court papers filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Camden, Fredric J. Gross, lead counsel for 14 former employees, also accused the company of violating a court order by withholding crucial records. A hearing is scheduled for next Friday. Gross also asked U.S. District Judge Stanley S. Brotman to appoint a special attorney to go through all computer and paper files at the convenience store chain's Canton, Mass.
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