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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
A samosa is a fried dumpling filled with meat or veggies (or both) that in India is traditionally sold by street vendors. At Mirchi, a Mexican and Indian restaurant at 236 South St., tradition mixes with nontradition as owner Satish "Sherman" Sharma incorporates the potato samosa into his specially designed sandwich. Served on freshly baked Indian bread known as Tandoori naan, this sandwich is stuffed with veggies, potatoes, spices and herbs such as cumin, cilantro and fenugreek leaves.
FOOD
April 8, 2010 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Cumin, cayenne, and coconut milk are among the diverse flavors of Brazil, where immigrants from Japan, Africa, and Europe brought their cultures and cuisines. They are featured in this sauteed chicken dish served over quinoa, an ancient grain indigenous to the Andes Mountains. Green beans can be substituted for okra. Add them to the chicken after it has simmered 10 minutes. Brazilian-Style Chicken Over Quinoa Makes 2 servings 1. Mix cumin and cayenne and rub over chicken.
FOOD
May 24, 1992 | By Paulette Ladach, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Spice companies make things easy on the cook by marketing a variety of ethnic spice blends. A seasoning mix may contain up to a dozen spices; typically, two or three dominate, with the rest providing flavor nuances. According to Stephen Wirtz, technical services manager for Specialty Brands Inc., maker of Spice Islands products, the exact formula is treasured like an old family recipe - and protected like a corporate secret. Generally, Italian blends rely on basil, oregano, fennel, garlic, thyme, rosemary and sage.
FOOD
August 7, 1994 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Too often less fat means less flavor. This is not just because oils and fats are themselves flavorful, but because most flavors - including those of herbs and spices - need the presence of fat in order to be perceived. So whenever we think of reducing fat in a recipe, we must also think of how to preserve and boost the flavors that remain. That's when a good rub can help. What are rubs? Rubs are powders ground from flavorful ingredients such as individual spices and herbs or blends of seasonings.
FOOD
May 2, 2013
Makes 6 to 8 servings 3 onions, chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 pound ground turkey 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 red or orange bell peppers, cored, seeded, and diced 1 teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste 2 teaspoons kosher salt 2 (28-ounce) cans whole peeled plum tomatoes in puree, undrained 1 15.5 ounce can kidney beans 2 tablespoons dried basil Fresh ground black pepper For serving: grated cheddar, sour cream (or Greek yogurt)
FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes a generous 11/4 cups 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons    extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup raw unsalted cashews 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon sweet smoked paprika (pimento dulce) 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and    coarsely chopped 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/3 cup water 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt 1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until the oil shimmers.
FOOD
December 27, 1989 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Microwave cooking is changing the way Americans eat. And of all its many advantages, none may be so important over the long term as its potential contribution to dieters. The microwave oven is perhaps the single easiest answer to low-fat cooking. That point is emphasized in the Microwave Gourmet Healthstyle Cookbook (William Morrow and Co., $22.95), the latest offering from Barbara Kafka, who also wrote Microwave Gourmet a couple of years back. Admitting to a lifelong battle with the bulges familiar to us all, Kafka notes suprise that in recent years she has found herself losing weight more easily and being better able to keep it off. The reason for this relief was easy to trace to her increased use of the microwave oven.
FOOD
May 26, 1999 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Wayne resident Sandy Greene got a surprise early last week when she tuned in to her usual a.m. round of televised news and chatter. Her entry in Good Morning America's recipe contest was announced among five entree finalists in what had been promoted as a sort of calorie-cutting cook-off. By week's end her creation - Oven-Fried Chicken With Andouille Sausage - was named number one by noted chef-judges Emeril Lagasse and Wolfgang Puck. "I watch some cooking shows and I collect cookbooks, but I've never entered a recipe contest before," Greene responded during a phone interview Friday, shortly after learning of her win and scheduled TV debut.
FOOD
January 24, 1996 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
While 1,300 Steeler fans are wolfing down Woodson Burgers on Super Bowl Sunday at Rod Woodson's restaurant, some 500 Cowboy fans will be chowing down on chicken-fried steak at Bill Bates' Cowboy Grill in north Dallas. Bates, a safety in his 13th year with the Cowboys, opened the restaurant last year. Decorated with Cowboys paraphernalia, it's fan-oriented and family-oriented - not surprisingly, since Bates is the father of four children, including 6-year-old triplets. Manager David Cooper said the Cowboy Grill isn't selling advance tickets for game day - "It's first come, first served" - and that a DJ, giveaways and "linebackers" (jalapeno peppers stuffed with cheese and chicken)
FOOD
February 27, 1994 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Americans are not adventurous seasoners, usually opting for simple salt and pepper, punctuated by an occasional parsley sprig or a blush of paprika. Then there's that big bowl of chili. Fumes of cumin mingle with oregano, cayenne catches the throat, and the slow glow of jalapeno can be felt on the lips. Chili is at once exotic and homey, challenging and comforting. It is a bowl of contradictions, and maybe that's why we can't agree on exactly what it is. We all know that chili is a stew, but what makes up the mix is a matter for perpetual debate.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 2, 2013
Makes 6 to 8 servings 3 onions, chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 pound ground turkey 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 red or orange bell peppers, cored, seeded, and diced 1 teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste 2 teaspoons kosher salt 2 (28-ounce) cans whole peeled plum tomatoes in puree, undrained 1 15.5 ounce can kidney beans 2 tablespoons dried basil Fresh ground black pepper For serving: grated cheddar, sour cream (or Greek yogurt)
FOOD
April 25, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
Add this recipe from Jennifer Perillo's new cookbook to your list of things to do with leftover rotisserie or roast chicken.   Cilantro Chicken Patties   Makes six 3-inch patties About 61/2 ounces boned, skinned roast chicken 1/4 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves 1 small yellow onion About 1/2 cup canola oil, for frying 1 large egg 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin ...
FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes a generous 11/4 cups 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons    extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup raw unsalted cashews 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon sweet smoked paprika (pimento dulce) 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and    coarsely chopped 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/3 cup water 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt 1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until the oil shimmers.
FOOD
March 8, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
On busy weeknights, we take our dinner shortcuts wherever we can find them. But this doesn't require sacrificing healthy home cooking. Make smart choices - as in this recipe for red curry potatoes and chickpeas - and you can have a great from-scratch dinner on the table in under 30 minutes. For deep, lush, and totally effortless flavor, I use canned coconut milk for the liquid. Looking to cut fat? Don't hesitate to use low-fat coconut milk. It won't be quite so lush, but the flavors will still be great.
FOOD
April 1, 2010
The ever-expanding Tiffin franchise has set a high bar for its local Indian competitors to hurdle. But now the also-growing Ekta, a no-frills Indian storefront in Fishtown started by one of Tiffin's founding chefs, Raju Bhattarai, offers a very respectable (and slightly less expensive) option. If anything, Ekta, which recently expanded to a Bryn Mawr location (1003 Lancaster Ave.; 610-581-7070), distinguishes its food with an edgier spice, like the dry and pungent pepper heat of the fresh chiles scattered like green confetti over the hari mirch ka naan flat bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
LATE-NIGHT dining often means less-than-healthy choices. Fortunately, newcomer Leila Cafe brings healthy Mediterranean cuisine to daytime as well as wee-hour noshing. Partners Smiley Al Chebab and Mohammad Kammon offer Middle Eastern fare with a Lebanese emphasis in a small Center City cafe appropriately named "pure night. " My first visit was early fall and the sidewalk was overflowing with al fresco dining and bustling, friendly table service. A recent renovation made the interior much more appealing for the colder months.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I used to think it wasn't possible to have too much of a good thing, and for the longest time, that was my sentiment regarding our abbondanza of Italian BYOBs. Who doesn't want a go-to trattoria for an affordable plate of pasta and a juicy branzino within a short walk of home? And yet, when Novità opened its doors on the 1600 block of South Street in the fall, the realization that there were nearly a dozen Italian BYOBs now within a five-block radius had an unexpected effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
A samosa is a fried dumpling filled with meat or veggies (or both) that in India is traditionally sold by street vendors. At Mirchi, a Mexican and Indian restaurant at 236 South St., tradition mixes with nontradition as owner Satish "Sherman" Sharma incorporates the potato samosa into his specially designed sandwich. Served on freshly baked Indian bread known as Tandoori naan, this sandwich is stuffed with veggies, potatoes, spices and herbs such as cumin, cilantro and fenugreek leaves.
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