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REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Drive down streets in any affluent neighborhood and you will see perfectly serviceable home furnishings waiting for trash crews to haul them away. "I hate for good things to go to waste in a landfill. I would be willing to arrange for things to be picked up and given to Goodwill or sold," said Leonore Spinelli, an agent with Century 21 Alliance in Moorestown as well as a residential interior designer and virtual stager. "The situation is such a shame, but great for street pickers," Spinelli said, although some communities discourage such collections.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's first experiment in curbside pickup of glass, aluminum and paper for recycling is slated to begin in a large section of northwest Philadelphia by Sept. 25, city Streets Department officials announced yesterday. Under the program, outlined at a meeting of the mayor's special interagency recycling task force, about 23,000 households will be asked to save all newspapers, cans and bottles and put them out for pickup every two weeks. The pilot area will consist of all households roughly six blocks on each side of Stenton Avenue from Broad Street to Cresheim Valley Drive and the Montgomery County line.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blame it on Facebook. A Lumberton woman has been charged with aggravated assault after a fight with a pregnant woman triggered by Facebook postings, police said. Samar Sawaged, 21, went to the victim?s Lumberton home with two friends Saturday night. The friends stayed in the car while Sawaged and the 20-year-old victim argued on the sidewalk, Lumberton Detective Sgt. Tony DiLoreto said. A fight erupted by the roadside. Both women were injured, suffering bruises and scrapes on their faces, DiLoreto said.
NEWS
January 4, 1995
A friend writes: "As a longtime, hard-core devotee of the Mummers Parade, I don't have a strong opinion on which street the parade is on. What continues to strike me is the dullness of the parade at street level. "At one point Sunday, about 2 p.m., I (just a spectator) crossed Market Street around 10th; the parade route was empty from 7th Street to 11th Street. Four quiet blocks in a nine-block parade - that's pathetic, and it's solely the fault of the Mummers, not the shift to Market Street this year, not Mayor Rendell.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Every once in a great while, you will still spot the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile, the glistening, 27-foot motorized hot dog (currently sporting Pontiac Firebird taillights), as it makes its all-American rounds - an earthbound comet, looping back in from the '50s. Lord, it was a sight; still is a sight. I'd charge after the thing in rowhouse Mayfair when I was a kid, heart racing, blissfully unaware - and deeply uncaring - about the actual contents of an Oscar Mayer (or any other) picnic wiener.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just about everybody hates junk mail - except BFI Waste Systems. The nation's second-largest recycling and waste company will offer free weekly curbside collection of junk mail and phone directories to its 20,000 residential customers in Montgomery and Chester Counties starting Jan. 1. Upper Merion and Tredyffrin are among the townships that will receive the new service. At the same time BFI announced the additional recycling, Upper Merion Township said it was discontinuing its junk-mail recycling.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township officials discovered an even more effective way to raise taxpayers' ire than raising taxes: Stop picking up grass clippings at curbside. Two weeks ago, without warning, trash collectors stopped picking up cans and bags of cut grass. Public works director James Agnesino ordered trash collectors to bypass the items. Since then, every council member, some district representatives and other public officials have been hit by a hailstorm of angry calls. The Public Works Department fielded about 250 calls.
NEWS
January 9, 2008 | By Lea Sitton Stanley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Evan Hughes took his lunch hour in the open window of a Walnut Street pizzeria yesterday. "I think it's going to be ice-cold again," Hughes said, forecasting today's weather from his table alongside the nearly floor-to-ceiling window, which had been thrown open. Well, maybe not ice-cold. But folks like Hughes - who decided "as soon as the sun came up" yesterday that he'd be dining out - weren't taking any chances. The Rittenhouse Square resident was one of many who threw off their wraps and took seats by open windows or at sidewalk tables as the temperature chugged up. The National Weather Service said the high at Philadelphia International Airport was 65 degrees, rivaling the record 69 set in 1998.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Town meetings here convene at the municipal building the first and third Mondays of the month. But for many residents, the real business is conducted on Saturdays: trash day. "We're the town meeting every Saturday," says township trash assistant Lee Fritzsche, a charmer who has been helping residents unload their garbage at the town hall for six years. Charm is something Fritzsche needs when it comes to helping new residents learn the ropes of the town's unusual trash collection.
FOOD
November 13, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If you linger on South Ninth Street long enough, it can come to have the feel of a boulevard of broken dreams - and not just because trash bags are heaped on occasion at the very base of the "Italian Market" signpost. A sausage-maker tried to get a merchants' Web site going. Nobody wanted to chip in, he says. SEPTA bus service got cut back, you'll hear, after stall owners complained their canopies were getting clipped. Every two hours, workers at Superior Pasta have to run out to move their cars to another meter or risk a ticket: The fine can be half a day's pay. And so on. It's not just trash-phobic suburbanites who dump on the Ninth Street Market.
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NEWS
September 21, 2015 | BY PAIGE GROSS, Daily News Staff Writer grossp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A WEST PHILADELPHIA man yesterday was found guilty of engaging in fighting and sentenced to three months' probation for his role in an altercation with a Philadelphia Police officer in May that led to his arrest. Frederick Smith, 55, was initially charged with engaging in fighting, unreasonable noise, obscene language and hazardous offenses - all forms of disorderly conduct - for the May 19 incident. But Municipal Judge Bradley Moss threw out all of the charges, except the one for fighting.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Drive down streets in any affluent neighborhood and you will see perfectly serviceable home furnishings waiting for trash crews to haul them away. "I hate for good things to go to waste in a landfill. I would be willing to arrange for things to be picked up and given to Goodwill or sold," said Leonore Spinelli, an agent with Century 21 Alliance in Moorestown as well as a residential interior designer and virtual stager. "The situation is such a shame, but great for street pickers," Spinelli said, although some communities discourage such collections.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FREDERICK SMITH was miffed. You'd be, too, if you parked your car at the curb, walked immediately to the parking kiosk to pay and returned seconds later to find a meter maid writing a ticket. Smith used some unpleasant language on that hazy May 19 afternoon at 12th and Chestnut in Center City. The Philadelphia Parking Authority ticket-writer, no doubt used to foul-mouthed freak-outs, calmly explained that the ticket was for expired inspection stickers, rather than any parking offense.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Andrew Miga, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Americans for generations have come to depend on door-to-door mail delivery. It's about as American as apple pie. But with the Postal Service facing billions of dollars in annual losses, the delivery service could be virtually phased out by 2022 under a proposal a House panel was considering Wednesday. Curbside delivery, which includes deliveries to mailboxes at the end of driveways, and cluster box delivery would replace letter carriers slipping mail into front-door boxes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
I bet your Christmas tree looks gorgeous. And I'm equally certain that if it's a live tree, in a week or two it will be dropping needles and you'll be eager to get rid of it. But you're not going to put it out at the curb with the trash, right? That would be naughty, not nice. Instead, recycle - or treecycle - it. Waste experts say that Americans' trash cans are bulging bigger than Santa's sack in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's. We produce something like 25 percent more trash then that at any other time of year.
NEWS
June 16, 2011
Spencer Coxe's influential victory The obituary Sunday of Spencer Coxe, executive director of the Philadelphia ACLU from 1952 to 1979, made no mention of his significant contributions to constitutional law. Most notable, perhaps, was the Schempp case, in which the U.S. Supreme Court banned Bible-reading in public schools as a violation of the First Amendment separation of church and state. In 1958, when Ellory Schempp, a student in Abington public schools and a member of the Unitarian Church, came to the ACLU director and complained that the Bible-reading mandated by Pennsylvania law violated his First Amendment right to be free of state-imposed religion, Coxe knew the case would cause an uproar in religious circles in the country.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials on Monday celebrated the opening of a sophisticated recycling plant in Northeast Philadelphia that will employ over 70 people once fully staffed and process more than 20,000 tons of discarded materials each month. Houston, Texas-based Waste Management Inc., spent more than $20 million on the, 60,000-square-foot center on the 5200 block of Bleigh Avenue, which serves the City of Philadelphia and other communities, the company said. The plant has been ramping up its operations since December and is nearly fully staffed, said company spokesman George McGrath.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blame it on Facebook. A Lumberton woman has been charged with aggravated assault after a fight with a pregnant woman triggered by Facebook postings, police said. Samar Sawaged, 21, went to the victim?s Lumberton home with two friends Saturday night. The friends stayed in the car while Sawaged and the 20-year-old victim argued on the sidewalk, Lumberton Detective Sgt. Tony DiLoreto said. A fight erupted by the roadside. Both women were injured, suffering bruises and scrapes on their faces, DiLoreto said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Every once in a great while, you will still spot the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile, the glistening, 27-foot motorized hot dog (currently sporting Pontiac Firebird taillights), as it makes its all-American rounds - an earthbound comet, looping back in from the '50s. Lord, it was a sight; still is a sight. I'd charge after the thing in rowhouse Mayfair when I was a kid, heart racing, blissfully unaware - and deeply uncaring - about the actual contents of an Oscar Mayer (or any other) picnic wiener.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Arrest in N. Phila. slaying Lisa Williams, 33, was arrested and charged in the stabbing death of Michael Higgins, 45, on 26th Street near Allegheny Avenue, in North Philadelphia. Higgins may have been killed on Friday, police said, but his body was not discovered until Monday. Police said that Williams was a friend of Higgins and lived around the corner. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 - all recyclable City residents can now recycle all plastic containers labeled No. 1 through No. 7, according to the Mayor's Office of Sustainability.
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