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Curfew

NEWS
April 14, 2001 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the assistance of state troopers and a strictly enforced dusk-to-dawn curfew, city officials restored a sense of order to the riot-scarred streets of Cincinnati yesterday, but were bracing for more racial turmoil today as the African American community prepared to bury one of its own. Although police reported more than 200 arrests Thursday night into yesterday morning, the 8 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew appeared to have largely stemmed the violence,...
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Debate over broadening curfew hours on Willingboro's school grounds was resurrected last week after a school board member asked that a failed proposal, which would have prohibited recreational use of the schools from dusk to dawn, be reconsidered. Board member William Lonkart said that vandalism had increased throughout the school district and that tougher measures must be invoked to limit access to the schools after dark. Under the township's current curfew, people younger than 17 must be indoors by 10 p.m. on weekdays, and midnight on weekends.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Gabriel Escobar, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
Dora Mona was sitting behind the bar at her discotheque, where the booze bottles shared a shelf with a statue of the Virgin Mary, six plastic roses and a votive candle. It had been 14 days since she had seen 11 p.m. at the disco - a curfew to curb the drug war violence gripping Medellin was at fault - and Dora Mona was anxious for customers. "Of course it hurt," she said last night of the curfew, which had been lifted earlier in the day. "In this business, you earn today to pay off tomorrow.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
Warren Beach, superintendent of Valley Forge National Historical Park, likes for people to enjoy the park, but there was one group that seemed to be having too much fun at the Memorial Arch. "(Some) did not come for the historic integrity of the area," Beach said. "When the malls closed, it was a place to congregate, and that's not why the arch is there. . . . The malls close at 9:30, and the cars rolled in at 10 of 10. " Each morning's accumulations of beer cans, graffiti and broken floodlights led Beach to enact a curfew.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Three times this year, vandals have broken into the Kromers' vehicles, causing more than $1,100 in damage. "I have a 1986 Trans Am," said Sherri Kromer. "They broke the window to steal a radar detector and a rearview mirror. " Kromer says the vandals have plagued her and her Browns Mills neighbors because they know they can get away with it. Police are overworked, the young people around her neighborhood have too many idle hours, and the spoils - radar detectors, car stereos - are too attractive, she said.
NEWS
April 2, 2011
An effort to set a curfew on late-night businesses in Camden is the wrong approach to fight crime in the city. Pushed by Mayor Dana L. Redd, the proposal would force most retail outlets to close at 11 p.m. on weeknights and midnights on weekends. Currently, there are no restrictions and some businesses, such as Chinese-food takeouts and fried-chicken eateries, are open 24-hours or at least until the early-morning hours. City officials contend there is a strong correlation between crime and late-night businesses, but they have not provided any data to support their case.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Camden businesses subject to a controversial late-night curfew won a reprieve Monday when a judge issued an injunction that prohibits city officials from enforcing the ordinance until a full hearing. Plans to start citing business owners who stayed open past 11 p.m. Monday were immediately put on hold. The ordinance, passed a year ago by City Council, is intended to control crime in a city that is ranked among the most dangerous in the nation. City officials argue that businesses that stay open into the early morning attract drug activity and other crime.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Halloween should be anything but eventful this year, as minors have been banished once again from township streets after dark. Anyone 18 years old and under must be accompanied by an adult after 8 p.m. on Oct 29, 30 and 31. Those traveling to and from legitimate activities, such as a job, a church group or an athletic event, are excused from the curfew. The ban targets those involved in vandalism and "malicious mischief" like trimming trees with toilet paper and christening car windows with eggs, said Police Chief Frank T. Rodgers.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Robert Moran and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
In response to recent teen mob attacks in Center City, Mayor Nutter announced Friday that police would strictly enforce curfews for juveniles this weekend. The curfew for children 12 and younger is 10 p.m. For youths ages 13 to 17, the curfew is midnight. "To the few who think they can get away with acting violently and disrespecting our city, you will be caught, and there are serious consequences," Nutter said. A first-time offense for a juvenile can result in a $250 fine, with fines up to $500 for subsequent violations.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By Meryll Hansen, Special to The Inquirer
An East Goshen township meeting to discuss establishing township curfews has been set for 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29, said Anthony G. Iacovelli, chairman of the township Board of Supervisors. Responding to complaints from residents of Goshen Valley, Goshen Downs and Charter Chase, who say that incidents of teenage vandalism seem to be increasing, the board set the meeting as an information-gathering workshop. Representatives of civic associations, officers of condominium and apartment complexes, the police chief, school principals and the township recreation director have been invited.
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