CollectionsCuriosity
IN THE NEWS

Curiosity

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
November 15, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"How do all the clouds and moon and stars fit up there?" Dayshawn wants to know. "Why does it get dark at night? Why does it rain?" And best of all - "Since our skin has holes in it for lotion to go into it, why doesn't blood come out?" Dayshawn, 7, has an average IQ and an above-average curiosity. He takes medication for an attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity, and is in special classes. There is neglect and abuse in his background. He has lived in many different places, and has a deep feeling of sadness and rejection.
LIVING
January 7, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael, 12, wants to be a scientist when he gets older. And he's walking on the path to knowledge already. "Is this called a town or a city?" he asks as he travels in the car. He has many more questions on his mind, too. "How many people live here? What do you think that is? I wonder how it works. " Because he has lived in so many places since entering foster care, Michael has a lot of catching up to do. He is doing well in special classes in school. He is on a fourth-grade level and has an average IQ. There are abuse and neglect in his background.
NEWS
June 9, 2002
E- Lectric- Ity is eerie And fearsome; this Is widely known. But when he could not wait to understand, 250 years ago this month, this town, Ben Franklin took his kite and keys and life in hand To an open field beneath a cloud apoplectic with storm And flew his imagination in the brave, mad hope Of catching spark (fire-fisher in air!), warm glint of God in the dangerous op- En. Glowed. Yay, Ben. He Was sure of this: Spirit is e- It Y K E Y e l e c t r i f i e d u s a l u s a
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
PASADENA, Calif. - The landing site of the Mars rover Curiosity was once covered with fast-moving and possibly waist-high water that could have possibly supported life, NASA scientists announced Thursday. While planetary scientists have often speculated that the now-desiccated surface of Mars was once wet, Curiosity cameras provided the first proof that flowing water was present on a least one part of Mars for "thousands or millions of years. " The early finding led Mars Science Laboratory mission top scientist John Grotzinger to conclude that Curiosity had already found a potentially "habitable" site - a central goal of the mission - well before heading to its primary destination.
NEWS
October 16, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Tongue Smell Color is a dance-theater piece that plunges you into the eroticism that many people approach with fear and curiosity when, even today, they think of interracial coupling. At Thursday's Philadelphia premiere, it was evident that the piece's creators, Brenda Dixon Gottschild, who is African American, and her German-born husband, Hellmut Gottschild, who is not, were right to choose such an explicit title. Through an 80-minute series of dances and dialogues that the two perform, they explore curiosity of the "other" in terms of gender, nationality and race.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - In a Mars first, the Curiosity rover drilled into a rock and prepared to dump an aspirin-size pinch of powder into its onboard laboratories for closer inspection. The feat marked yet another milestone for the car-size rover, which landed last summer to much fanfare on an ambitious hunt to determine whether environmental conditions were favorable for microbes. Using the drill at the end of its 7-foot-long robotic arm, Curiosity on Friday chipped away at a flat, veined rock bearing numerous signs of past water flow.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. - Curiosity took its first test drive around the gravel-strewn Martian terrain Wednesday, preparation for the ultimate road trip to find out if life could have existed on the Red Planet. The six-wheel NASA rover did not stray far from the spot where it landed more than two weeks ago. It rolled forward about 15 feet, rotated to a right angle, and reversed a short distance, leaving track marks on the ancient soil. Mission managers were ecstatic that the maiden voyage of the $2.5 billion mission was glitch-free.
NEWS
November 23, 2011 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - As big as a car and as well-equipped as a laboratory, NASA's newest Mars rover blows away its predecessors in size and skill. Nicknamed Curiosity and scheduled for launch Saturday, the rover has a 7-foot arm tipped with a jackhammer and a laser to break through the Martian red rock. What really makes it stand out: It can analyze rocks and soil with unprecedented accuracy. "This is a Mars scientist's dream machine," said NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Ashwin Vasavada, the deputy project scientist.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Scott Gold
Los Angeles Times PASADENA, Calif. - Three weeks from Sunday night, an amiable, whip-smart engineer named Ray Baker will be staring into his computer screen at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, hopeful and helpless - or, as he puts it, "sweating blood. " The night will have been 10 years and $2.5 billion in the making, incorporating the work of 5,000 people in 37 states. And then, 154 million miles from home, the fate of the most ambitious machine humans have sent to another planet will rest on a seven-minute landing sequence so far-fetched it looks like something Wile E. Coyote devised to catch the Road Runner.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Chestnuts roast on an open fire. Ghost stories are best told around a campfire. And what's a birthday cake without lighted candles? Throughout our life, fire has a special significance. It can be fascinating, charming, symbolic - and dangerous. But what is most frightening is when children see only its allure. "Fire is a universal curiosity for human beings," said Ann Itzkowitz, family therapist and psycholgist at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Center. "It's normal for children to be curious.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
How coaches "do things" has always held the attention of Downingtown East's Bob Schnure. The X's and O's, the strategy involved in the sport of basketball. Whether Schnure was watching a game at home with his wife, Fran Baliotti, and making her rewind so he could jot down the play they had just witnessed, or listening to countless coaches such as John Wooden and Pat Summitt at clinics, his curiosity for basketball has never waned. A paragon of success in his 35-year coaching career at Downingtown High School and then Downingtown East, Schnure still has that curiosity.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Autistic boy sought in Calif. MENIFEE, Calif. - Officials pledged to keep scouring a sun-scorched area of Southern California on Tuesday until they find an autistic 11-year-old boy who was last seen at his home over the weekend. Temperatures have topped 100 degrees every day since Terry Dewayne Smith Jr. went missing, but that didn't stop hundreds of emergency workers and volunteers from combing the dry brown hills of Menifee on Tuesday. Searchers are concentrating on a 55-square- mile area.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The notion of landing astronauts on Mars has long been more fantasy than reality: The planet is, on average, 140 million miles from Earth, and its atmosphere isn't hospitable to human life. But a human voyage to the planet is now, for the first time, within the realm of possibility, according to space advocates inside and outside government. As a result, plans for a mission around the planet, and ultimately for lengthier stays, have been sprouting like springtime flowers.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - In a Mars first, the Curiosity rover drilled into a rock and prepared to dump an aspirin-size pinch of powder into its onboard laboratories for closer inspection. The feat marked yet another milestone for the car-size rover, which landed last summer to much fanfare on an ambitious hunt to determine whether environmental conditions were favorable for microbes. Using the drill at the end of its 7-foot-long robotic arm, Curiosity on Friday chipped away at a flat, veined rock bearing numerous signs of past water flow.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Partners in life and art, Marilyn Keating and Debra Sachs also are joint curators of the South Jersey Museum of Curiosities. The name they chose for their online gallery could describe their Gloucester City home as well. It isn't open to the public, but it's nearly as impressive as a museum - and probably more fun. "Wow," I say at the sight of a striking display of tall, urn-like sculptures in the front hallway. It won't be the last time I'm bowled over during my visit. "These are all my work," says Sachs, 59. "Except for the cat and the Trojan horse.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
PASADENA, Calif. - The landing site of the Mars rover Curiosity was once covered with fast-moving and possibly waist-high water that could have possibly supported life, NASA scientists announced Thursday. While planetary scientists have often speculated that the now-desiccated surface of Mars was once wet, Curiosity cameras provided the first proof that flowing water was present on a least one part of Mars for "thousands or millions of years. " The early finding led Mars Science Laboratory mission top scientist John Grotzinger to conclude that Curiosity had already found a potentially "habitable" site - a central goal of the mission - well before heading to its primary destination.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. - Curiosity took its first test drive around the gravel-strewn Martian terrain Wednesday, preparation for the ultimate road trip to find out if life could have existed on the Red Planet. The six-wheel NASA rover did not stray far from the spot where it landed more than two weeks ago. It rolled forward about 15 feet, rotated to a right angle, and reversed a short distance, leaving track marks on the ancient soil. Mission managers were ecstatic that the maiden voyage of the $2.5 billion mission was glitch-free.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
After a triumphant landing, the Curiosity rover is ready to search Mars for signs of past life or suitability for life. Several readers have raised concerns that NASA scientists might fail to recognize life if it isn't based on carbon or is otherwise radically different from our kind of life. It's true that biologists don't have a single agreed-upon definition of life, and often end up with a laundry list of characteristics instead. That's been a concern for NASA, and so in the 1990s, the space agency convened a panel to try to define life, said Steve Benner, a biologist from the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution (FfAME)
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
NASA has dubbed the Mars landing planned for early Monday morning the "seven minutes of terror" because that's how long the craft has to slow from 13,000 miles an hour to zero. The entry starts with a parachute, then rockets, and, finally, a novel "sky crane" with a cable that will lower a rover the size of a car gently onto the planet's surface. Though previous craft have landed on relatively gentle terrain, this is the first aimed at a precise spot close to more hazardous topography.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Chris Gibbons
By Chris Gibbons   One of the greatest pay-per-view events in history — expensive to produce but very affordable for viewers — will begin its broadcast around the globe on Monday. It's not WrestleMania or the long-awaited Manny Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather Jr. showdown, and it's not taking place in Las Vegas, Atlantic City, or the Superdome. As a matter of fact, it will unfold more than 150 million miles from Earth.   NASA's car-sized Curiosity rover will begin its perilous plunge through the atmosphere of Mars early Monday morning, and modern technology will enable millions around the world to anxiously follow the descent and subsequent explorations of the Red Planet's surface.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|