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Curiosity

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LIVING
November 15, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"How do all the clouds and moon and stars fit up there?" Dayshawn wants to know. "Why does it get dark at night? Why does it rain?" And best of all - "Since our skin has holes in it for lotion to go into it, why doesn't blood come out?" Dayshawn, 7, has an average IQ and an above-average curiosity. He takes medication for an attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity, and is in special classes. There is neglect and abuse in his background. He has lived in many different places, and has a deep feeling of sadness and rejection.
LIVING
January 7, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael, 12, wants to be a scientist when he gets older. And he's walking on the path to knowledge already. "Is this called a town or a city?" he asks as he travels in the car. He has many more questions on his mind, too. "How many people live here? What do you think that is? I wonder how it works. " Because he has lived in so many places since entering foster care, Michael has a lot of catching up to do. He is doing well in special classes in school. He is on a fourth-grade level and has an average IQ. There are abuse and neglect in his background.
NEWS
June 9, 2002
E- Lectric- Ity is eerie And fearsome; this Is widely known. But when he could not wait to understand, 250 years ago this month, this town, Ben Franklin took his kite and keys and life in hand To an open field beneath a cloud apoplectic with storm And flew his imagination in the brave, mad hope Of catching spark (fire-fisher in air!), warm glint of God in the dangerous op- En. Glowed. Yay, Ben. He Was sure of this: Spirit is e- It Y K E Y e l e c t r i f i e d u s a l u s a
NEWS
February 9, 2016
Tariq 'Black Thought' Trotter, 42 Lead singer/MC of the Roots On my own volition (and at the suggestion of the intellectuals in my sphere), a younger me delved into giants such as Dr. John Henrik Clarke, a black writer, pioneer in Africana studies, and one of the main reasons academic institutions in this country have courses on black and African history today. Another major influence was Cheikh Anta Diop, an African historian and politician, whose anthropological studies, as in the books The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality and Precolonial Black Africa , taught me where human beings originated and the truth about my people's magnificence prior to the transatlantic slave trade.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
PASADENA, Calif. - The landing site of the Mars rover Curiosity was once covered with fast-moving and possibly waist-high water that could have possibly supported life, NASA scientists announced Thursday. While planetary scientists have often speculated that the now-desiccated surface of Mars was once wet, Curiosity cameras provided the first proof that flowing water was present on a least one part of Mars for "thousands or millions of years. " The early finding led Mars Science Laboratory mission top scientist John Grotzinger to conclude that Curiosity had already found a potentially "habitable" site - a central goal of the mission - well before heading to its primary destination.
NEWS
October 16, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Tongue Smell Color is a dance-theater piece that plunges you into the eroticism that many people approach with fear and curiosity when, even today, they think of interracial coupling. At Thursday's Philadelphia premiere, it was evident that the piece's creators, Brenda Dixon Gottschild, who is African American, and her German-born husband, Hellmut Gottschild, who is not, were right to choose such an explicit title. Through an 80-minute series of dances and dialogues that the two perform, they explore curiosity of the "other" in terms of gender, nationality and race.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - In a Mars first, the Curiosity rover drilled into a rock and prepared to dump an aspirin-size pinch of powder into its onboard laboratories for closer inspection. The feat marked yet another milestone for the car-size rover, which landed last summer to much fanfare on an ambitious hunt to determine whether environmental conditions were favorable for microbes. Using the drill at the end of its 7-foot-long robotic arm, Curiosity on Friday chipped away at a flat, veined rock bearing numerous signs of past water flow.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. - Curiosity took its first test drive around the gravel-strewn Martian terrain Wednesday, preparation for the ultimate road trip to find out if life could have existed on the Red Planet. The six-wheel NASA rover did not stray far from the spot where it landed more than two weeks ago. It rolled forward about 15 feet, rotated to a right angle, and reversed a short distance, leaving track marks on the ancient soil. Mission managers were ecstatic that the maiden voyage of the $2.5 billion mission was glitch-free.
NEWS
November 23, 2011 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - As big as a car and as well-equipped as a laboratory, NASA's newest Mars rover blows away its predecessors in size and skill. Nicknamed Curiosity and scheduled for launch Saturday, the rover has a 7-foot arm tipped with a jackhammer and a laser to break through the Martian red rock. What really makes it stand out: It can analyze rocks and soil with unprecedented accuracy. "This is a Mars scientist's dream machine," said NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Ashwin Vasavada, the deputy project scientist.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Scott Gold
Los Angeles Times PASADENA, Calif. - Three weeks from Sunday night, an amiable, whip-smart engineer named Ray Baker will be staring into his computer screen at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, hopeful and helpless - or, as he puts it, "sweating blood. " The night will have been 10 years and $2.5 billion in the making, incorporating the work of 5,000 people in 37 states. And then, 154 million miles from home, the fate of the most ambitious machine humans have sent to another planet will rest on a seven-minute landing sequence so far-fetched it looks like something Wile E. Coyote devised to catch the Road Runner.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I've been with my fiance for three years, and I'm very much in love. A few months ago, I asked to use his phone to look up something on the Internet because my battery had died. It opened up to a gay porn site! I was shocked and asked him whether it was something he was looking at. He admitted that it was. Nothing like this has happened to me before, so I began asking whether that's what he likes and is into. He assured me the answer was no. He said he looked because he was simply curious about it. He told me he loves women and doesn't want to be with men. He said he was just looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). The theme is personal power and how you're going to find, keep, and use it. Proceed full steam ahead, and you'll be very surprised and pleased about all that you can accomplish in one day. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You're nice, but not so nice that you'll let just anyone take up your time. You'd like to know what's in it for you, and because you're smart, wise, and shrewd, you'd like this information ASAP. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You'll get the distinct impression that the group needs a leader and that they're looking to you. The commitment may seem daunting, but be assured, this group will calm down with a strong leader.
NEWS
February 9, 2016
Tariq 'Black Thought' Trotter, 42 Lead singer/MC of the Roots On my own volition (and at the suggestion of the intellectuals in my sphere), a younger me delved into giants such as Dr. John Henrik Clarke, a black writer, pioneer in Africana studies, and one of the main reasons academic institutions in this country have courses on black and African history today. Another major influence was Cheikh Anta Diop, an African historian and politician, whose anthropological studies, as in the books The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality and Precolonial Black Africa , taught me where human beings originated and the truth about my people's magnificence prior to the transatlantic slave trade.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My husband and I (and, as a result, our two young children) are estranged from his parents after years of hostility came to a head in the fall. My mother-in-law's behavior was the crux of the issue, and my husband attempted to work through it until giving up. Our children are still very young, with one of them old enough to understand that her grandparents used to be present but now are not. How do I explain why they're not seeing their grandparents without unfairly biasing the children against them?
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Linda George
I need someone like Fred Rogers to assuage the unfathomable evils existing in the world. Clad in his famed cardigan sweater and slippers, Mr. Rogers, of the award-winning Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood , represented stability in a society grappling with a multitude of ills. He once reassured his audience, "When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.' " Despite the barrage of threatening pictures featuring masked men and women determined to kill others as well as themselves, those helpers exist - often at the risk of their own lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I have lived in the United States for 40 years. My first 32 years were spent in Puerto Rico, so I speak with an accent. My problem is almost everyone I meet asks me where I'm from. I usually try to disguise my discomfort by jokingly asking them to guess. The truth is, I feel singled out as being different and not belonging. My friends and family tell me I'm being too sensitive, that people are just curious. I say it's rude to ask such a personal question of a total stranger.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
How coaches "do things" has always held the attention of Downingtown East's Bob Schnure. The X's and O's, the strategy involved in the sport of basketball. Whether Schnure was watching a game at home with his wife, Fran Baliotti, and making her rewind so he could jot down the play they had just witnessed, or listening to countless coaches such as John Wooden and Pat Summitt at clinics, his curiosity for basketball has never waned. A paragon of success in his 35-year coaching career at Downingtown High School and then Downingtown East, Schnure still has that curiosity.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Autistic boy sought in Calif. MENIFEE, Calif. - Officials pledged to keep scouring a sun-scorched area of Southern California on Tuesday until they find an autistic 11-year-old boy who was last seen at his home over the weekend. Temperatures have topped 100 degrees every day since Terry Dewayne Smith Jr. went missing, but that didn't stop hundreds of emergency workers and volunteers from combing the dry brown hills of Menifee on Tuesday. Searchers are concentrating on a 55-square- mile area.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The notion of landing astronauts on Mars has long been more fantasy than reality: The planet is, on average, 140 million miles from Earth, and its atmosphere isn't hospitable to human life. But a human voyage to the planet is now, for the first time, within the realm of possibility, according to space advocates inside and outside government. As a result, plans for a mission around the planet, and ultimately for lengthier stays, have been sprouting like springtime flowers.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - In a Mars first, the Curiosity rover drilled into a rock and prepared to dump an aspirin-size pinch of powder into its onboard laboratories for closer inspection. The feat marked yet another milestone for the car-size rover, which landed last summer to much fanfare on an ambitious hunt to determine whether environmental conditions were favorable for microbes. Using the drill at the end of its 7-foot-long robotic arm, Curiosity on Friday chipped away at a flat, veined rock bearing numerous signs of past water flow.
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