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NEWS
May 23, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one of Baghdad's most dangerous neighborhoods, in the center of a congested marketplace lined with food stalls and shoeshine boys, more than 100 men clustered together, shouting out numbers. Blocks of Iraqi dinars wrapped in dirty rubber bands changed hands; thousands of U.S. dollars were waved in the air. It was hot, dirty and chaotic, with boys pushing through the crowd to sell cold drinks, cars honking as they inched along the narrow road, and traders carrying loaded weapons and looking warily at strangers.
NEWS
May 21, 2003 | By Bob Fernandez and Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
With the nation threatened by deflation and the labor market still bleeding jobs, the Bush administration is letting the value of the dollar decline against foreign currencies in another attempt to jolt the nation into an economic recovery. The dollar fell again yesterday to 0.86 euros, near its four-year low. The dollar has weakened 21 percent against the European common currency in the last 12 months. At the same time, it has fallen 6.8 percent against the Japanese yen. Some economists say that allowing the dollar to decline is the last big tool the White House has to fix an economy that has threatened to slip back into a recession for months.
NEWS
January 3, 2003 | By Gwynne Dyer
"I want the whole of Europe to have one currency," said Napoleon in 1807. A year ago his dream came true, more or less, and it didn't even take a conquest. But where does the euro go from here? The simple answer is: out and up. It spreads outward from the 12 countries that abandoned their old marks, francs and drachmas for the euro last year to one or more of the three holdouts among the existing European Union members: Sweden, Denmark and the United Kingdom, and then on to the 12 countries scheduled to join in the next five years.
NEWS
October 10, 2002 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the upstart American colonists decided to declare their independence and start a war with the the troops of King George, the British devised a clever military strategy: They flooded the young country with counterfeit currency. "It was the first time there was a massive effort to use counterfeit to disrupt the economy," said Bill Troppman Jr., a ranger at Valley Forge National Historical Park. Yesterday, in preparation for the grand opening this weekend of a redesigned visitors' center at the park, Troppman was leading a tour of the facility for a select group of Revolutionary War historians and authors for whom this was old news.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Money, money everywhere, but for Jose Boveda Fernandez, gazing around at the one-ton mounds of Irish coins, all there is is copper. "For us, coins are metal," said Boveda Fernandez, director of Elmet S.L., owner of the two factories in Spain charged with giving the now-useless coins a new lease on life. "As copper producers, we are very interested in their copper content. " The two factories are among several around Europe where Europe's coins went to die when a common currency was introduced this year.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2002 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some billionaires, like Warren Buffett, are known for their investment philosophy. Some billionaires, like Bill Gates, are feared for their market dominance. And some billionaires, like George Soros, can sound more like revolutionaries than pinstriped denizens of Wall Street. At the University of Pennsylvania yesterday to promote his new book, George Soros on Globalization, Soros lashed out at the Bush administration's foreign policy. The President has fallen into a trap set by terrorists who wanted this country to go to war and sow the seeds for further acts of terrorism, he said.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2002 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
McDonald's Corp., facing a series of problems in international markets, is warning that its profits are likely to be below expectations for the first quarter and all of 2002. The fast-food company is being hurt by weak foreign currencies, especially the euro. Also, concerns about the safety of beef in Japan continue to affect sales in that country. In addition, sales in Latin America are down, and the company is closing stores in Turkey. McDonald's, in an earnings update, forecast quarterly earnings per share of 29 cents to 30 cents, excluding onetime charges.
NEWS
January 5, 2002
It's auf Wiedersehen to the deutsche mark, au revoir to the franc, adios to the peseta, arrivaderci to the lira, hyv?sti to the markka, yeia sas to the drachma. As of Tuesday, all these honored (and in some cases beloved) currencies were tucked into the bed of oblivion. Hello to the euro, a single currency shared among 12 nations in Europe. All but three (England, Sweden and Denmark) of the European Union's members signed on to a dream 10 years old (since the Maastricht Treaty of 1991)
BUSINESS
January 1, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Starting today, a dozen West European countries will begin spending, saving and counting in a new common currency, the euro. Governments have distributed more than 65 billion euro notes and coins in place of the familiar national currencies, which will be phased out. The switch has prompted a surge in last-minute spending of French francs, Spanish pesetas and Italian lira hoarded by some citizens to avoid their governments' high tax rates....
BUSINESS
December 30, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twelve European currencies - among them the mighty German mark and the colorful Dutch guilder, the ancient Greek drachma and the modern Irish punt - will begin to vanish on New Year's Day. They will be replaced by the euro, the European Union's tool for economic unity and its attempt to compete with the U.S. dollar as the world's money of choice. Since the decline of the British empire in World War II and the rise of America as the world's strongest economic and military power, American dollars have replaced British pounds as the leading currency for trade and finance, drawing trillions in foreign investment despite the nation's massive trade deficit.
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