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Curricula

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NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Great Valley school board has approved new curricula in four subject areas as part of a districtwide review. Detailed new objectives and new courses in the foreign language, home economics, business education and arts programs were formulated this summer and presented formally to the school board Tuesday by Assistant Superintendent David B. Morgan 3d. The changes were unanimously approved. New courses include keyboarding, dance, musicianship, video communications, art history, word processing, business graphics, marketing and high-tech home economics, and German, Spanish and Latin at the middle-school level.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Some faculty members at Rancocas Valley Regional High School will spend time this summer revamping the curricula in a number of courses so that students can meet new state requirements, according to a school official. The faculty will be using existing equipment and material. Joseph Biringer, the school's assistant principal for curriculum, said last week that about 35 teachers would spend time this summer changing math, English, French, Spanish, Latin, business, biology, physical education and health courses.
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Immediately after they've mastered nap time and sharing, kindergartners will toy with careers in allied health if Glassboro and Washington school administrators get their way. "What do you think a doctor does? Why don't you draw me a doctor?" Eileen Gallo said, demonstrating the type of questions educators hope will prompt 5-year-olds to contemplate their professional futures. Gallo, coordinator of the Gloucester County Work Investment Board, acknowledges that as educational tactics go, such questions are rather innocuous.
NEWS
October 14, 1996
In 13 years of handwringing since "a rising tide of mediocrity" was first spotted in the nation's schoolhouses, the nation still hasn't decided what it thinks a high-school graduate ought to know and be able to do. There's been no end of talk about devising rigorous standards. But the push for answers to that most basic of questions - What should children learn? - has been undercut by the nation's confusion over what values are most important in education. Those who dare to draft standards have been bedeviled by suspicious parents, defensive educators and ideologues of all stripes.
LIVING
April 18, 1999 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the last century, psychiatry has generally argued that religion has no role in improving mental health. In fact, religion was an anathema to many psychiatrists. Freud spent the latter half of his career criticizing religion as mere "illusion. " The couch surely had no place for God. Well, there's room for the deity now. New curricula include religion and spirituality in a number of psychiatric residency programs. Young psychiatrists are being taught to explore the role of religion in their patients' lives.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
I wish that every time people have a debate about public education, they would add three words: in a democracy. Don't talk about public education; talk about public education in a democracy. Don't talk about vouchers; talk about whether vouchers work in a democracy. Don't talk about curricula; talk about curricula in a democracy. Democracy is the context of our educational systems, and the problems of education, to some degree, mirror the problems of democracy. . . . To [the founders]
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Three evaluation committees have been formed to review the Wallingford- Swarthmore School District curricula for social studies, foreign languages, and the program for gifted and talented students. The committees were approved by the school board during its business meeting Monday evening. Made up of residents and members of the district's staff, the committees are part of a five-year plan to review and improve the district's curricula. In 1986, similiar committees reviewed the district's curricula for special education, health and physical education, and language arts.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
The New Hope-Solebury School District has won two grants for teacher training, and the folks at the school board meeting Monday were mighty pleased about it. In fact, district parents, residents and teachers who were at the meeting burst into a loud round of applause when Superintendent Irene Bender announced the district would receive a $25,000 grant from the Coalition of Essential Schools and a $7,400 Lead Teacher Grant from the state....
NEWS
July 8, 1995
Most U.S. children are not going to college. Ditto in Europe. Yet the U.S. system of education caters to the college-bound, not the work- bound. In England, France and Scotland, for example, schools provide a strong academic foundation for all. A study by the American Federation of Teachers unfavorably compares the U.S. system to Europe's. Students not headed to university there are prepared for vocational and technical fields through rigorous curricula, apprenticeships and "gateway" exams to prove mastery of relevant job skills.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | by Kay S. Hymowitz, New York Times
Teaching teen-agers about masturbation, which led to Joycelyn Elders' dismissal as surgeon general, is a howling example of bringing coals to Newcastle. But as the smoke clears from this latest skirmish in the culture wars, we should rethink the terms of the debate. Condom distribution and "safe sex" curricula are only symptoms of a much deeper problem: the prevalent divorce of sex from deep feeling. While Hollywood turns up the heat, educators scramble to keep the lid on. But though they may call into question the posturing of gangster rappers and warn of the dangers of serial encounters, their medical, bureaucratic and legalistic assumptions add oxygen to the atmosphere in which deromanticized sex can thrive.
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SPORTS
November 9, 2007 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Rob Lohr honors his oral commitment to play football at Vanderbilt, he will be on an even playing field with most incoming freshman recruits when he shows up on the Nashville campus next summer. Academically, Lohr, 17, could be many yards ahead. The standout tight end and defensive end at Phoenixville is enrolled in the Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School, a public school program offering home-schooling curricula and online assistance. Through the program, Lohr also takes math, sociology and English courses at Montgomery County Community College's Pottstown campus three days a week.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
ON A RECENT afternoon, I found myself wandering through the aisles of a Center City bookstore. Searching for a quiet corner, I headed for the gender-studies section, where, to my surprise, I realized that one of the two sexes had apparently been eliminated. Scanning the shelves, I saw tome after tome on the plight/accomplishments/desires/history/psychology of women. Titles ranged from the sappy ("Sisterhood Is Forever") to the new age ("The Tao of Womanhood") to the intergenerational ("The Raging Grannies")
NEWS
August 24, 2004
The American Federation of Teachers, a union that helped introduce the charter school concept, just released a report about charter students' scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. The AFT found that charter school fourth and eighth graders scored mostly lower in math and reading in 2003 than peers in traditional classrooms. That finding - based on the same test charter zealots have used to condemn public school systems - injects badly needed realism into the debate over charters.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
I wish that every time people have a debate about public education, they would add three words: in a democracy. Don't talk about public education; talk about public education in a democracy. Don't talk about vouchers; talk about whether vouchers work in a democracy. Don't talk about curricula; talk about curricula in a democracy. Democracy is the context of our educational systems, and the problems of education, to some degree, mirror the problems of democracy. . . . To [the founders]
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | By Mark Stroh INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Amazing things materialize in George Trout's woodworking classes at Springfield High School. Forget birdhouses. When the sawdust clears, there might be an armoire, a sideboard, or a chest of drawers, finely wrought and flawlessly finished. In his 15 years in the Delaware County district, Trout has championed "shop" as a way of teaching not only a craft but also creative thinking, problem-solving, and pride in one's handiwork. Trout is not alone. But he could be soon. Wood shop, one of the last vestiges of the so-called industrial arts, is disappearing from the curricula of schools across the region - consigned to the trash bin of subjects deemed irrelevant to 21st-century education.
NEWS
February 4, 2001
President Bush learned an important lesson as governor of Texas: Few topics are more important to the public than improving public education. His just-released 28-page blueprint on education got an encouraging response from Congress, where Democrats proposed a plan that mirrors his in some respects. President Bush deserves credit for seeking right from the start to exercise a welcome leadership role in improving the nation's schools. When he took over as governor of Texas, his state already was among the nation's leaders in carrying out serious education reforms, including requiring smaller classes, establishing a no-pass-no-play rule for athletes and strengthening teacher education.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Annenberg Foundation has awarded a $7.8 million, five-year grant to a local nonprofit organization to work in schools to promote students' social and emotional growth as well as academic studies. Foundations Inc., which is based in Mount Laurel and has offices in Philadelphia, will collaborate with the Developmental Studies Center, based in Oakland, Calif. Both have specialized curricula and programs geared to supporting students' character development as a key to their school success.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brash, new high school graduate Kate Chmielefski knew of technical schools' bad rep. Yet, she chose to spend her senior year attending one. "Tech is the greatest," said Chmielefski, who studied commercial art at the Western Center for Technical Studies in Limerick, Montgomery County, after completing academic courses her junior year at her home school, Spring-Ford Area High. "I found more benefits at Tech, honestly, than all my years of schooling - elementary, middle, high school," she said.
LIVING
April 18, 1999 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the last century, psychiatry has generally argued that religion has no role in improving mental health. In fact, religion was an anathema to many psychiatrists. Freud spent the latter half of his career criticizing religion as mere "illusion. " The couch surely had no place for God. Well, there's room for the deity now. New curricula include religion and spirituality in a number of psychiatric residency programs. Young psychiatrists are being taught to explore the role of religion in their patients' lives.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A city without a school district, said 10th grader Kenya Hamm, "might as well be a city without a name. " Hamm's schoolmate, Chester Upland High School student body president Suni Blackwell, pointed to the pride Chester feels when its basketball team wins a game or its students win a spelling bee. Without its own school district, Blackwell said, the city's pride would be gone. Students, parents, teachers and administrators turned out in force Saturday at Widener University's University Center to protest a state plan to close the troubled district.
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