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Curt Flood

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SPORTS
November 13, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Much of the memorabilia Curt Flood's widow will sell at a Louisville auction tomorrow remains painful for Philadelphians to contemplate. There is his white-gold World Series ring from 1964, the year the Phillies' historic collapse gave his Cardinals the pennant. There are trophies and awards that remind us how good a player Philadelphia lost when Flood, setting in motion the legal fight that would topple baseball's reserve clause and trigger free agency, refused his 1969 trade here.
SPORTS
January 21, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Curt Flood, a pioneer whose lonely and courageous challenge of baseball's reserve clause paved the way to the present-day riches of free agency, died yesterday after a long battle with cancer. He was 59. Indirectly, his legacy is Albert Belle's $55 million contract and the freedom of movement today's players enjoy but often take for granted. Flood succumbed to throat cancer at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was one of the finest defensive centerfielders to ever play the game, in addition to hitting .300 six times.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
BACK IN THE DAY, when major league baseball resembled a half-vast plantation and teams owned players forever and a day, the Cardinals traded centerfielder Curt Flood to the Phillies. It was October 1969 and Flood got the news from the publicity guy, so far down the chain of command he rattled when he walked. Flood said, hell no, he won't go. What he actually said was, "In the history of man, there's no other profession except slavery where one man is tied to one owner for the rest of his life.
SPORTS
January 21, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Curt Flood, whose adamant refusal to report to the Phillies after being traded by the St. Louis Cardinals nearly 30 years ago shook the foundation of major-league baseball and set in motion the era of free agency, died of throat cancer yesterday at age 56. Mr. Flood sued Major League Baseball, claiming its reserve clause, which prohibited a player from choosing the team he played for, violated antitrust laws. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. And while Mr. Flood lost in a 5-3 vote, his stance is regarded as the first major step in establishing free agency.
NEWS
November 22, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
Curt Flood, a 165-pound whippet of a centerfielder, could outrun most fly balls but it took him 24 years to catch up to his 1969 Gold Glove award. His story is rich with lessons about courage, freedom and the conceit that we can predict freedom's consequences. He had a career batting average of .293 in 15 seasons, 12 with the St. Louis Cardinals. But nothing so became him in baseball as his manner of leaving it. Although he played 13 games with the 1971 Washington Senators, he really left after the 1969 season when the Cardinals traded him to Philadelphia and he said hell no, I won't go. Black ballplayers have done much to move freedom forward.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
What: HBO documentary, "The Curious Case of Curt Flood" Debut: Wednesday, 9 p.m. Other HBO playdates: July 13 (3:45 a.m.), 16 (10 a.m.), 19 (4 p.m., midnight), 22 (6 p.m.), 25 (8 a.m., 2:30 a.m.), 28 (2 p.m., 8:30 p.m.) and 31 (11:30 a.m.). Also airing several times on HBO2 and available via HBO On Demand from July 18 to Aug. 15. What They're Saying: "Every player in every team sport owes a debt of gratitude to Curt Flood. His life story is a very complex character study.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
ISSUE | BASEBALL Robinson not the only black trailblazer Once again, Major League Baseball celebrated Jackie Robinson Day on Friday ("Howard, Baker pay tribute to No. 42, Jackie Robinson," Saturday). We are aware of Robinson's tribulations as he fought courageously to become the first black player in the major leagues. But how many people remember another black baseball player, Curt Flood? It was Flood who tested baseball's reserve clause in 1970 when he refused to play for the Phillies, who had obtained him in a trade with the Cardinals.
SPORTS
January 28, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The Bash Brothers are together again. Jose Canseco returned to the Oakland Athletics in a trade from Boston yesterday and will be reunited with Mark McGwire, with whom he formed one of the most explosive combos in baseball in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Last season, Canseco batted .289 with 28 homers and 82 RBI. Canseco, who left Oakland in a 1992 trade with Texas, was sent back to the A's for righthander John Wasdin, who was 8-7 with a 5.96 ERA last season in 25 games, 21 of them starts.
SPORTS
January 22, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
He was a painter before he was a player, and his art reflected who he was and how he felt. Once, Curt Flood sat down and painted Dr. Martin Luther King. The painting hangs in the living room of King's widow, Coretta. Flood, 59, died after a yearlong bout with throat cancer on Monday, a day of celebrating the life of the slain civil rights leader. "It's interesting he died on Martin Luther King Day," said Bing Devine, the former St. Louis Cardinals general manager, who set the wheels of free agency in motion when he dealt Flood to the Phillies as part of a seven-player deal in 1969.
SPORTS
January 8, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the results of this year's voting are released tomorrow, Mike Schmidt will have been elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. Almost everyone agrees on that. It won't be unanimous, but close to it. The former Phillies third baseman is as safe a bet as Newt Gingrich in a Georgia election. The only question about the Hall of Fame balloting is: Who else - if anyone - will be joining Schmidt for the induction ceremonies this summer in Cooperstown, N.Y.? Last year, the Baseball Writers Association of America voters chose only one player - former Phils pitcher Steve Carlton.
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NEWS
April 22, 2016
ISSUE | BASEBALL Robinson not the only black trailblazer Once again, Major League Baseball celebrated Jackie Robinson Day on Friday ("Howard, Baker pay tribute to No. 42, Jackie Robinson," Saturday). We are aware of Robinson's tribulations as he fought courageously to become the first black player in the major leagues. But how many people remember another black baseball player, Curt Flood? It was Flood who tested baseball's reserve clause in 1970 when he refused to play for the Phillies, who had obtained him in a trade with the Cardinals.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
HBO offers an important sports documentary debuting Wednesday in The Curious Case of Curt Flood. If you know your sports history, you remember that Flood was the man who started baseball on a path toward the free-agency era. The 31-year-old sued Major League Baseball rather than report to the Phillies after he was traded from St. Louis following the 1969 season. Flood didn't win his court case, but few question that his actions were crucial in raising awareness about the fairness of the system, which tied players to teams for life.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
What: HBO documentary, "The Curious Case of Curt Flood" Debut: Wednesday, 9 p.m. Other HBO playdates: July 13 (3:45 a.m.), 16 (10 a.m.), 19 (4 p.m., midnight), 22 (6 p.m.), 25 (8 a.m., 2:30 a.m.), 28 (2 p.m., 8:30 p.m.) and 31 (11:30 a.m.). Also airing several times on HBO2 and available via HBO On Demand from July 18 to Aug. 15. What They're Saying: "Every player in every team sport owes a debt of gratitude to Curt Flood. His life story is a very complex character study.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
BACK IN THE DAY, when major league baseball resembled a half-vast plantation and teams owned players forever and a day, the Cardinals traded centerfielder Curt Flood to the Phillies. It was October 1969 and Flood got the news from the publicity guy, so far down the chain of command he rattled when he walked. Flood said, hell no, he won't go. What he actually said was, "In the history of man, there's no other profession except slavery where one man is tied to one owner for the rest of his life.
SPORTS
July 18, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last Wednesday, 33 summers after he last whipped that utility-pole bat, Dick Allen walked uncomfortably into a meeting room at the Sheraton Society Hill. Still trim at 70, wearing a dark suit and a robin's-egg blue polo shirt, Allen searched for a familiar face. The ex-Phillies slugger, there to be revealed as a 2010 inductee into the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame, wasn't alone for long. Bald men, gray-haired men, men with paunches as thick as the mountain of cold cuts piled on the buffet table at the rear of the room, gravitated to him, as if pulled by an invisible force.
SPORTS
November 13, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Much of the memorabilia Curt Flood's widow will sell at a Louisville auction tomorrow remains painful for Philadelphians to contemplate. There is his white-gold World Series ring from 1964, the year the Phillies' historic collapse gave his Cardinals the pennant. There are trophies and awards that remind us how good a player Philadelphia lost when Flood, setting in motion the legal fight that would topple baseball's reserve clause and trigger free agency, refused his 1969 trade here.
SPORTS
December 13, 2002 | By Claire Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in baseball history, Hall of Fame candidates are being considered not just for the kind of physical power exhibited by a strong man such as former Phillies slugger Dick Allen. Power of a different sort - as represented by Marvin Miller, whose vision for the baseball players' union made it the most powerful labor organization in sports, and by Curt Flood, whose groundbreaking refusal to accept a trade that helped spark baseball's labor movement - also found a place on the Hall of Fame veterans committee ballot announced yesterday.
SPORTS
January 28, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The Bash Brothers are together again. Jose Canseco returned to the Oakland Athletics in a trade from Boston yesterday and will be reunited with Mark McGwire, with whom he formed one of the most explosive combos in baseball in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Last season, Canseco batted .289 with 28 homers and 82 RBI. Canseco, who left Oakland in a 1992 trade with Texas, was sent back to the A's for righthander John Wasdin, who was 8-7 with a 5.96 ERA last season in 25 games, 21 of them starts.
SPORTS
January 22, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
He was a painter before he was a player, and his art reflected who he was and how he felt. Once, Curt Flood sat down and painted Dr. Martin Luther King. The painting hangs in the living room of King's widow, Coretta. Flood, 59, died after a yearlong bout with throat cancer on Monday, a day of celebrating the life of the slain civil rights leader. "It's interesting he died on Martin Luther King Day," said Bing Devine, the former St. Louis Cardinals general manager, who set the wheels of free agency in motion when he dealt Flood to the Phillies as part of a seven-player deal in 1969.
SPORTS
January 21, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Curt Flood, whose adamant refusal to report to the Phillies after being traded by the St. Louis Cardinals nearly 30 years ago shook the foundation of major-league baseball and set in motion the era of free agency, died of throat cancer yesterday at age 56. Mr. Flood sued Major League Baseball, claiming its reserve clause, which prohibited a player from choosing the team he played for, violated antitrust laws. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. And while Mr. Flood lost in a 5-3 vote, his stance is regarded as the first major step in establishing free agency.
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