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Curt Schilling

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SPORTS
April 2, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Bill Giles swung out onto the concourse at Dodger Stadium from the private box from which he had just witnessed the Phillies nail down a 3-0 Opening Day win, a win made possible by an overpowering pitching performance by Curt Schilling. When reporters approached, the Phillies president smiled and clamped his hand over his mouth like the speak-no-evil monkey. Giles realized, of course, that the newshounds wanted to know about the negotiations for Schilling's contract extension, talks that seem to have gone on longer than it took to get the Blue Route built.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
WOE TO Curt Schilling , who is auctioning off his household items Saturday in Medfield, Mass., to satisfy creditors from his failed video-game company, 38 Studios. Fortunately for us vultures, all of the items he is set to auction were put online. The weirdest item? Two promotional baseball caps for the movie "Flubber," signed by star Robin Williams . The saddest? All of the toys. Even the stuffed animals have to go, Curt? His movie and TV preferences are interesting.
SPORTS
September 4, 2009 | By Paul Hagen
IF CURT SCHILLING really does run for the U.S. Senate seat from Massachusetts left open by the death of Ted Kennedy, it will be the race that launched a thousand quips. That much, at least, became crystal clear as the Boston Globe collected Red Sox reaction to the political musings of their former teammate. "He would be good at filibustering," general manager Theo Epstein wrote in a text message. Most of the players preferred not to have their names attached to their zingers.
SPORTS
May 7, 1997 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Curt Schilling was unusually pensive before last night's start. Where were the wisecracks? Where was the opinionated commentary that resonates through the clubhouse, regardless of the topic or time of day? After losing his previous two starts and giving up 10 earned runs in 11 innings, Schilling had his game face on early. The man-on-a-mission approach - not to mention a blazing fastball - helped the righthander post his first victory in 15 days as the Phillies held off the Houston Astros, 5-1, at the Astrodome.
SPORTS
July 8, 2000 | By Don McKee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Steinbrenner must be salivating. If the New York Yankees owner is about to open serious bidding for a pitcher who can get his club into the World Series for a third consecutive year, he surely would have had his satellite feed tuned to Veterans Stadium last night. Two sturdy righthanders who could get the Yanks into the series were matched up in a terrific pitching duel, and both of them were electric. Unfortunately for the Phillies, the Baltimore Orioles' Mike Mussina got the better of the showdown with Curt Schilling.
SPORTS
August 6, 1997 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Had things gone differently, Curt Schilling's dramatic strikeout of Larry Walker in the fifth inning last night might have gone down as the most memorable vignette of this Phillies season. With runners on second and third, two out and the Phils leading by a run, Schilling iced one of the sport's most deadly hitters with four 98-m.p.h. fastballs, an extraordinary feat considering the season Walker is having, not to mention his .433 batting average with two out and men in scoring position.
SPORTS
July 9, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is, by now, the dance of the dumbfounded. A Phillies batter swings, takes a few small steps while briefly watching the ball's flight, flips his bat in disgust and, head down, spins toward the dugout. Increasingly, as after last night's 3-1 loss to Chicago at Veterans Stadium, these now-familiar steps are followed by the sound of Philadelphia, a throaty boo. Afterward, in a sparsely populated clubhouse where questions about the long-vanished offense easily outscore the answers, there is little sound but the muted voices of frustration.
SPORTS
September 11, 1993 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pete Incaviglia's left knee is sore. Really sore. But his swing is healthy. Really healthy. Incaviglia knocked in three runs and Curt Schilling pitched 8 1/3 solid innings as the Phillies defeated the Houston Astros, 6-2, before 31,146 fans at Veterans Stadium last night. The crowd gave the Phils a single-season Veterans Stadium attendance record of 2,777,967, topping the old mark of 2,775,011 set in 1979. Schilling was hit on the right calf by Eddie Taubensee's liner with one out in the ninth.
SPORTS
May 14, 1992 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies did some major reshuffling of their beleaguered pitching staff yesterday after No. 2 starter Tommy Greene was placed on the 15-day disabled list, where he joined much of the rotation that was expected to return the team to contention this season. Phils manager Jim Fregosi dropped Danny Cox (2-2, 4.63 ERA) from the rotation and added reliever Curt Schilling (2-2, 3.20 ERA). That left the Phils, 13-19 after last night's loss to the Giants, with a starting five of Terry Mulholland, Kyle Abbott, Cliff Brantley, Schilling and Brad Brink, who was recalled from triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to fill Greene's roster spot.
SPORTS
February 27, 1999 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of able-bodied Phillies was down considerably yesterday. Blame it on the Phillie Phlu. Fifteen players missed part or all of the team's workout at Carpenter Complex as a bug swept through the team like a tornado. "These things can happen when you have a bunch of guys in one clubhouse," manager Terry Francona said. "But I've never seen this many guys sick in one shot. " Even assistant general manager Ruben Amaro was struck down by the illness. From a sick bed, Amaro managed to put the final touches on shortstop Desi Relaford's contract.
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SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Ian Kinsler, who was traded from Texas to the Detroit Tigers in the offseason, said Tuesday some critical statements attributed to him in an ESPN The Magazine story were taken out of context. In the story, Detroit's new second baseman blamed Rangers GM Jon Daniels for the departure of Rangers CEO Nolan Ryan. "Daniels is a sleazeball," Kinsler was quoted as saying. "He got in good with the owners and straight pushed Ryan out. He thought all the things he should get credit for, Ryan got credit for. " Kinsler was also quoted as saying he hopes the Rangers lose every game: "To be honest with you, I hope they go 0-162.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curt Schilling, one of the Phillies' all-time greatest pitchers and a current ESPN analyst, revealed Wednesday that he has cancer. "I've always believed life is about embracing the gifts and rising up to meet the challenges," Schilling said in a statement released by ESPN. "We've been presented with another challenge, as I've recently been diagnosed with cancer. " Schilling did not disclose the specific nature of his illness. The network was unclear about whether Schilling, 47, will assume his duties this season as an analyst for ESPN's Sunday night telecasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
WOE TO Curt Schilling , who is auctioning off his household items Saturday in Medfield, Mass., to satisfy creditors from his failed video-game company, 38 Studios. Fortunately for us vultures, all of the items he is set to auction were put online. The weirdest item? Two promotional baseball caps for the movie "Flubber," signed by star Robin Williams . The saddest? All of the toys. Even the stuffed animals have to go, Curt? His movie and TV preferences are interesting.
SPORTS
October 9, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
CURT SCHILLING is having a garage sale. The former Phillies and Red Sox pitcher, whose video-game company filed for bankruptcy last year, has hired an estate-sale company to sell off a slew of personal items, including a baseball glove chair and an old-fashioned Coca-Cola vending machine. Schilling is being sued by Rhode Island's economic development agency, which approved a $75 million loan for 38 Studios, a video-game startup that filed for bankruptcy last June. The suit claims Schilling and other execs knew the company would fail before it accepted the money.
SPORTS
September 24, 2013 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
ANY ATTEMPT to handicap future Hall of Fame votes is complicated by the need to predict the whims of an electorate whose homogenous composition leaves it susceptible to groupthink, regional bias and moralistic crusading. Exhibit A: The most recent round of voting, in which Curt Schilling, Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds were each named on fewer than 40 percent of ballots despite credentials that would appear to make them surefire Hall of Famers (the threshold for induction is 75 percent)
SPORTS
August 5, 2013
CURTIN' CALL * Re: Schilling talks Phillies, regrets (Aug. 2): Curt Schilling for all he did good for the Phillies will always be remebered forthe towel over his head in the 1993 World Series. To this day, I can say I was disappointed in the fact he only did that to Mitch Williams. He showed up a teamate and that is not something you do ever and to do it in the World Series is even worse. Curt pitched well as a Phillie and if you can forget the forced trade and the towel he was a good pitcher for the Phillies.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
THE BIRTH of the best big-game pitcher of the last quarter-century took place two decades ago in South Philly. The Phillies entered the day facing elimination and were three outs away from taking the World Series back to Toronto when Curt Schilling took the mound for the ninth inning at Veterans Stadium. He was working on a five-hit shutout. "I remember kind of feeling the stadium moving," Schilling said. With 62,706 people about to go berserk in the ballpark, Schilling made quick work of the only three batters he faced, including two guys who would finish in the top three of the American League MVP voting that year (John Olerud and Paul Molitor)
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Philadelphia's Top 50 Baseball Players By Rich Westcott University of Nebraska Press. 272 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Larry Eichel   According to local baseball historian Rich Westcott, someone named Bob Johnson is one of the top 50 baseball players in Philadelphia history. Never heard of him? The man known as "Indian Bob" (he was one-quarter Cherokee) played for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1933 through 1942, spending most of his time in left field.
SPORTS
April 4, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
ATLANTA - Mind over matter. Stamina over stuff. Brain over brawn. For Roy Halladay, perhaps it won't be all that difficult to continue his evolution as a major league pitcher. He was burned at an early age and rebuilt, in part with an overhaul to his mechanics and in part to the power of positive thinking. If the last 12 months are any indication, Halladay doesn't have the $20 million arm that made him baseball's best pitcher for the majority of the last decade. But he still has the tireless work ethic and meticulous game preparation.
SPORTS
April 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE NEW YORK Yankees set a record for baseball's highest Opening Day payroll at $230.4 million, almost 10 times what the Houston Astros are paying their players. After all the talk of spending restraint during the offseason, the Yankees began the season well ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Dodgers are at $214.8 million and only the second franchise to break the $200 million barrier, according to a study of big-league contracts by the Associated Press. Houston was last at $27.3 million, less than the major league-leading $29 million for the Yankees' Alex Rodriguez.
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