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FOOD
March 3, 1993 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Our shower curtain is badly stained and really grungy from soap scum and mildew. Is there a way to get it clean, or should we just buy a new one? - Gayle Don't spend your money on a new curtain until you've tried washing it in bleach. Just put the curtain in the washing machine with warm water, a tiny bit of laundry detergent and two cups chlorine bleach. The bleach should remove stains and mildew and leave the curtain fresh and clean. Rehang the curtain on the shower rod to drip-dry naturally.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sixty seconds is barely enough time to compose a Tweet, let alone reveal an entire play's dramatic arc. It would seem an insurmountable task to get wordy playwrights to come up with narratives to fit into the tiny time confines of one minute. "Hey, drama is drama, whether it's in 90 minutes, three hours, or one minute," says A. Zell Williams about the idea of reconfiguring his usually loquacious aesthetic to fit the parameters of the first Philadelphia One-Minute Play Festival, presented Monday through Wednesday by InterAct Theatre Company at the Adrienne Theater.
NEWS
December 17, 1999
It's when you travel across North America that the spirit of your ancestors begins more and more to make you aware and talk to you. But the curtains of noise and pollution that cripple all communication must be lifted. Because, sooner or later, men will have to decide whether they want to perish or survive and therefore try to rediscover the old . . . language that, one day, can allow the ancestors freely to take care of the land and the earth. Gesso, also known as KaroniaKeson, also known as Harold Thomas
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
In the custom-laden theater world, tinkering with tradition is just not proper. Unless ticket sales are at stake. As arts organizations struggle with the aging of their audiences, several groups are testing tradition by experimenting with the standard 8 p.m. curtain time. Theater managers and marketers said they hope earlier curtains - some as advanced as 6:30 and 7 p.m. - will lure younger audiences and satisfy suburban subscribers. "It's an opportunity," said Sally de Sousa, general manager of Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays at Annenberg Center, which is introducing 6:30 p.m. Early Tuesday Night performances this season.
NEWS
March 7, 2001
Would someone please open the curtains? A serious Dark Age is sure to descend on this city if someone doesn't soon start opening the curtains - and the doors - on our government. The latest skirmish in our shadow government broke out last week, when Council President Anna Verna and Councilwoman Marian Tasco fired a salvo to Mayor Street, removing themselves from the Philadelphia Gas Works Recovery team, set up in return for City Council approval of a loan for the troubled utility.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | Inquirer Correspondent / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
The making of a dancer was the topic when the Ballet des Jeunes and its school, Donna Tambussi Studio of Dance, brought the curtain down on National Dance Week with an exhibition Saturday.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Witnesses to future executions in Pennsylvania will, for the first time in recent memory, be able to see and hear the entire procedure. Under an agreement to settle a federal lawsuit filed last year by The Inquirer and the Harrisburg Patriot-News, witnesses will view the process from the moment the condemned person enters the death chamber to the time he or she is pronounced dead. "This is a victory for First Amendment rights and the public's right to know," acting Inquirer editor Stan Wischnowski said.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Renee Lucas Wayne Daily News Theater Critic
We concede that the temperature outside is not exactly conducive to doing much more than hunkering down at home. However, theater-goers would do well to suffer a bit for their art this weekend, and take advantage of the varied offerings currently on stage. The Philadelphia premiere of "Valley Song," the first exploration of post-apartheid South Africa by celebrated playwright Athol Fugard, opens tonight at People's Light & Theatre Company, 39 Conestoga Road, Malvern. Perhaps Fugard's most autobiographical piece to date, the play is a three-character story - an author, a grandfather and his teen-age granddaughter - all seeking to find their way in an era of change.
NEWS
June 12, 2006 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Group Motion presented three dances at the Drake Theater Friday night, and all were marred by technical problems and other frustrations. One constant annoyance was a sheer curtain that was required to perform more functions than it was designed to handle. It was split down the center so that a dancer could slip through, or that half could be down. It also had cords sewn through it so it could be lifted. But the split and the cords left a cross-shaped pattern that got in the way when the curtain was used as a screen for the videos that were an integral part of the program.
SPORTS
March 21, 1996 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One wayward step nearly cost top-seeded Massachusetts its best shooter for tonight's NCAA East Regional semifinal game against 12th-seeded Arkansas at the Georgia Dome. UMass guard Carmelo Travieso fell about four feet off a platform serving as a stage in an interview area yesterday, and suffered contusions to his lower back and buttocks. Afterward, UMass trainer Ron Laham said that Travieso should be able to play against the Razorbacks, but that he would probably have to fight through some soreness.
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NEWS
October 4, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County's largest municipality is the latest to join the region's riverfront development craze. Just days after New Jersey officials announced a major Camden waterfront project, Bensalem officials on Friday released details of their long-awaited plan to transform 675 acres along the Delaware River over the next two decades. They dubbed the plan "River Renaissance in New Bensalem. " "Right now, Bensalem is at a crossroads. One path leads to obsolescence, the other path leads to relevance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015
Q: I have numerous pairs of antique lace curtains. The lace itself is intact, but the netting sections have tears/holes in them. Is it worth repairing the netting or cost prohibitive? And where could I get them done? Should the lace itself be cut away for another use? - Hannah A: Although I don't have experience in antique lace, a lot of my readers often wonder what to do with old things that are in need of repair - so your question is a good one. For information about your lace curtains, I reached out to the American Textile History Museum, which is affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
OK, I made the mistake of eating a large, healthy-looking but unexpectedly sugary cookie shortly before I went to see "The Sky's Gone Out," an exhibition at Moore College of Art and Design that examines the influence of the uncanny on contemporary art and design. But that only partially explains the queasy feeling I experienced seeing this show inspired by Sigmund Freud's 1919 essay, "The Uncanny," which posited the uncanny as an aesthetic quality that could make the familiar appear mysterious or frightening.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the audience settles in and the lights dim at the Merriam Theater on Monday night at 7, a full-scale theatrical celebration returns to Philadelphia for the first time in three years. The Barrymore Awards are back - and back in a robust style that reflects the thriving nature of the city's stage community. Not since the demise of the Theatre Alliance of Greater Philadelphia in 2012 have local theater efforts been recognized across the boards, so to speak. A small teaser ceremony was held last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Brace yourselves, Philly theater people: Joanna Settle, the new head of the Brind School of Theater Arts at the University of the Arts, has arrived with big plans - for herself, her students, and the city's theatergoers. Blindingly articulate and brimming with new-kid optimism, Settle recently returned from the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, where she collaborated with Passing Strange singer/songwriter Stew on his new musical, Family Album . She is making her local directorial debut at the Wilma Theater this week with Gina Gionfriddo's Rapture, Blister, Burn . During an interview in which big names dropped right and left, Settle - wearing silver shoes - explained the similarities involved in directing, producing, and running a school within a university: "There's a reason they call it 'helming' - you're steering this thing.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
When leaders of the Pennsylvania Ballet grew weary of a seemingly endless loop of financial strain, they turned to Michael M. Kaiser. With unpaid vendors knocking on the Philadelphia Theatre Company's door and its chances of surviving increasingly in doubt, it was Kaiser who was tapped to gauge how bad the crisis was, why it existed, and what could be done. From his perch in Washington, Kaiser, 60, has become an unseen hand in the Philadelphia arts realm, consulting with PTC and the ballet, the Mural Arts Program, Philadanco, and the Asian Arts Initiative.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Prince Music Theater will close its doors and cease to exist as a cultural institution Nov. 30 unless new leadership takes on the expense and work of keeping it alive, its current leaders say. With the death in May of meat-processing entrepreneur and philanthropist Herb Lotman, the Prince lost its board chairman and chief fund-raiser. His widow, Karen Lotman, and their family are not interested in continuing his role in remaking and running the theater since it emerged from bankruptcy auction in January 2013.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BEIJING - The Philadelphia Orchestra is used to veneration in China, but not like this. The orchestra was said to be "rewriting the history of our musical life" by Patrick Ren, executive director of programming at Beijing's National Centre for the Performing Arts. Facing a battery of TV cameras Thursday morning, he said, "Every time they walk on stage, they are in some way . . . creating a new epoch. " His comment indicates that Year Three of the Philadelphia Orchestra's five-year plan with the National Centre is anything but redundant.
REAL_ESTATE
April 21, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Spring has been here for more than a month, and I'm just getting to seasonal cleaning suggestions. From Robin Wilson, described as a healthy-space designer and "ambassador" for the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, come the following tips: In the bathroom, get rid of your vinyl shower curtain, because it holds mold more easily and off-gases. Use a nylon curtain instead. Use nontoxic cleansers, and always lower the toilet seat when flushing to ensure that spraying particles do not land near or on your towels, toothbrushes, or soaps.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Volvér, the first prepaid, ticketed restaurant in the city, debuted Wednesday night at the Kimmel Center with Jose Garces at the stove serving his guests Siberian sturgeon caviar and Wagyu beef cooked on embers, as part of the priciest tasting menu in town. The concept of paying big bucks in advance before diners even know what's for dinner is a novel experiment, not only here, but across the country. Volvér's menu was announced just on Wednesday morning. About 40 percent of the available seats have been sold through mid-June, said Scott Steenrod, vice president of restaurant operations for the Garces Group.
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