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REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 1987 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Peachtree Point Moorestown (609) 235-1950 Finely detailed, custom-built houses, with the accent on custom woodwork, are offered at Peachtree Point in Moorestown. Maines & Simpson Inc. (Steward "Gub" Maines 3d and Paul Simpson) and Robert Maines are building houses that exceed 3,000 square feet of living space and $350,000 in price. Forty houses on two- to five-acre lots are planned for the site, which includes a section of the Rancocas Creek. To date, the largest house is close to 5,000 square feet, and the most expensive cost about $425,000.
REAL_ESTATE
January 24, 1986 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Longview Lane, Marlborough Township, Chester County 459-5500. In the midst of the historic Brandywine area of Chester County, custom, single-family houses are under construction at Longview Lane. The 44-acre development is adjacent to, and takes its name from, the renowned Longwood Gardens. The site plan calls for the 23 houses of Longview Lane to be located along one slightly curving lane that ends in a cul-de-sac. Surrounding the site are horse farms, other single houses and about 108 acres of Longwood Gardens, including a bird sanctuary.
REAL_ESTATE
July 19, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Estates at Stone Ridge, Buckingham Township, Bucks County To say that 12 standard designs are offered by DeLuca Enterprises Inc. at the Estates at Stone Ridge is misleading. In fact, calling any home at Stone Ridge "standard" is understatement at the least. Priced well above a half-million dollars each, the homes in this new community are really custom designed - even the "standard" ones are being completely customized to each buyer's needs and desires. For example, the Aspen design proved to be but a starting point for the home of Chanchal Khanna, a pathologist, and her husband, Om, a surgeon.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. looks for clues, he usually looks under the rug. In his latest case, he examined the rug itself. Such diligent detective work was what helped break The Case of the Tricky Toupe, in which an establishment selling hair replacements called The Hairmakers wasn't, well, making hair. Preate's office said yesterday that The Hairmakers, with stores in Center City and King of Prussia, stated in sales contracts that its hairpieces were "custom-made" when in fact they were stock hairpieces previously manufactured to standard sizes.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
M ELISSA D'AGOSTINO, 32, of Germantown, uses hand-dyeing techniques to create her artsy women's-wear line. D'Agostino Fashion Textile Design also custom-made Philadelphia first lady Lisa Nutter's formal dress for President Obama's inaugural ball. Q: What's your background? A:I'm a graduate of Moore College of Art & Design. I was formerly a hand-block fabric printer at a textile-and-lighting studio. My textiles started as works of art and wall hangings, and the fabrics evolved into products I could sell.
SPORTS
October 17, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Steve Behrle will some day work for his father. Yesterday, he went to work on Malvern Prep's offense. Behrle, a 5-10, 185-pound senior linebacker, collected eight tackles and two sacks and forced a fumble - recovered by lineman Mark Muraglia and converted into the game's final touchdown - as Episcopal Academy, the heavy preseason favorite, muffled the host Friars, 24-0, in an Inter-Ac League opener. Actually, Behrle - it rhymes with Merrill - already works for his father.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert A. Hopf, 75, a retired custom-home builder who had a great interest in sports, died Saturday at his home in Jenkintown after a long illness. Mr. Hopf founded Robert A. Hopf Builders in 1950, and built customized houses in the Somerton and Bustleton sections of Philadelphia, Huntingdon Valley in Montgomery County, and Newtown Township and Washington Crossing in Bucks County. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he was a member of the Jenkintown Zoning Hearing Board. Mr. Hopf was born in New York City and reared in Philadelphia, graduating from Frankford High School in 1940.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | BY DAVE BARRY
As a widely respected foreign correspondent, I recently felt the need to travel to Germany so I could observe firsthand the front lines of this dangerous all-dominating worldwide struggle we have come to know as the Cold War. At least that's what I'm going to tell the Internal Revenue Service. The truth is, I went to Germany because this is the year I turn 40, and I felt the need to be surrounded by the largest possible quantity of beer. They are very good at beer, the Germans, and what is more, they tend to serve it in vessels the size of municipal stadiums.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Guido B. Muscelli, 101, one of the owners and operators of Muscelli Brothers Clothing Manufacturers, in South Philadelphia, for 70 years, died Sunday at Zurbrugg Hospital, Willingboro. Mr. Muscelli died on his birthday and had enjoyed sound health until about a month ago. He had lived in South Jersey for the last 10 years and at the Burlington Woods Convalescent Center, in Burlington Township, for the last five years. Mr. Muscelli was born in Italy, where he learned to sew. He came to the United States at age 16. He entered the country through Ellis Island and settled in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
Rafeal "Flash" Vasquez is in the driver's seat of a sleeksilver Nissan he calls "La Cura," which in Spanish means The Cure. Trembling with hundreds of iron horses under its hood, the car nudges forward, block by block, turning heads and drawing crowds. Finally, it parks at the corner of Cambria and Franklin streets in the heart of North Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community. Vasquez, 23, steps out of the car's blue-steel interior and slowly lifts its hatchback. Almost instantly, the neighborhood of rowhouses, corner groceries and auto body shops is transformed into an open-air nightclub beneath the setting sun. Under the hatchback of Vasquez's heavily customized 1984 Sentra, in a handmade wooden cabinet, is a bank of 10 public-address-system-sized speakers, each electronically screaming the Latin strains of Frankie Ruiz, Raphy Leavitt and an assortment of New York rappers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 23, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Customized Energy Solutions, a Philadelphia energy consulting and services firm, announced Thursday that it is acquiring Powerit Solutions, a Seattle company that helps businesses reduce energy costs by managing power demand. The firms use sophisticated software to help clients to shift electricity loads to take advantage of regional wholesale power markets, which incentivize users to reduce demand during peak periods, a practice known as demand response. "With our acquisition of Powerit, CES has taken a huge step toward offering one of the industry's most complete demand-response services," Stephen Fernands, Customized Energy Solutions' founder and president, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Want a free workout to treat your holiday hangover? WeTrain, a Philly start-up, is offering one free workout session - if you send the company a message using social media. And you have to mention that the company just won Philly's version of the hit television show Shark Tank . A 30-minute session regularly costs $17 or $25, if you split it with another person. Philly's version of the television show is called Veteran Shark Tank. And the winners were Zachary Hertzel and Jon Sockol, co-founders of the start-up WeTrain, at the Dec. 7 competition at the Cira Centre next to Amtrak's 30th Street Station.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday reprimanded another competitive electricity supplier for charging customers higher rates than it promised during last year's severe winter. The PUC voted to fine Stamford, Connecticut-based Public Power L.L.C. $72,000 for overcharging about 50 customers whose variable rates it had promised would not go up by more than 15 percent. The company said its new owners, Crius Energy, had discontinued the price-protection plan and that it had failed to recognize existing customers on the plan, resulting in the billing errors.
SPORTS
December 11, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
ONCE IN every man's life - we'll use men, since I am slightly more expert with that gender - once in every man's life he should, if possible, experience the joy of . . . He should have a dark suit tailored. He should have black shoes made . . . or, at least, properly fitted. And, if he plays golf, he should have a set of clubs designed to fit his particular swing. If nothing else, he should be fitted for a driver. It's that time of the year, and it makes for a perfect gift . . . to yourself, if no one else is willing.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.'s proposed cable-TV franchise renewal could save low-income senior citizens between $15 and $83 a year on their cable-TV bills - if they apply for a new discount - and expand discounted Internet services to low-income residents. The deal also will give the Philadelphia cable giant the legal right to operate over the next 15 years in the city, which produces an estimated $550 million a year in revenue and $200 million in annual profits for the firm, based on city and company financial data.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania customers of retail electricity supplier IDT Energy Inc. may receive refunds for high charges incurred last year under an agreement settling deceptive marketing practices filed Thursday with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. IDT Energy Inc. will pay $2.4 million in refunds to eligible consumers, in addition to the $4.1 million the company has already paid, Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane and Acting Consumer Advocate Tanya J. McCloskey announced in August.
FOOD
November 13, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In the scramble for the newest thing, the personal connection between chefs and diners can sometimes get lost in the shuffle. That's why some Philadelphia-area restaurateurs are taking inspiration from their own lives, both in their decor and cooking and in reconnecting with customers in interesting ways. From its inception, Midtown Village newcomer Bud & Marilyn's was conceived as a throwback to owner Marcie Turney's grandparents' restaurant in Wisconsin. "My grandfather was the cook, and my grandmother ran the front.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. said 590,000 of its Xfinity subscriber email user names and online passwords were available for sale illegally on the Internet last week, but only about 200,000 subscriber accounts were active and could be potentially compromised. Comcast, the Philadelphia-based cable TV giant, has been forcing the 200,000 subscribers nationwide to reset their passwords, a company spokeswoman said Tuesday, adding that she did not know how many customers had done so. When asked whether Comcast had heard from any of these customers, claiming that someone been using their user names or passwords improperly, the spokeswoman said no. The subscriber accounts in question represent a fraction of the company's customers.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TUESDAY STARTED like any other day for Ruben Morel, manning the counter at the J & R Perez Grocery. That is until an anonymous gunman burst through the door and fired four shots into the Mantua corner store, which was packed with customers during the morning rush, including a few children. "I just froze," Morel, 31, said Tuesday night. "I had to make sure the kids were OK. " They were, but another customer - whom police sources identified as Maurice McDonald - wasn't. McDonald, 22, was hit several times as he sat near shelves bearing soda and snacks just before 8:30 a.m. Responding officers took him to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead about 20 minutes later, police said.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Manayunk Bridge dominates the view from the outdoor deck behind Gaily's Crazy Cow Cafe. The nearly 100-year-old bridge reopened Friday as a pedestrian and bicycle throughway connecting Lower Merion and Philadelphia. "I'm hoping they'll see me from the bridge and come down here," said Gaily Moore, the owner of the restaurant on Manayunk's Main Street. She is among business owners looking to the bridge to bring new customers. The proximity of Main Street shopping to the bridge has some envisioning Manayunk as the go-to shopping and eating destination for Lower Merion's Bala Cynwyd community.
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