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REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 1987 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Peachtree Point Moorestown (609) 235-1950 Finely detailed, custom-built houses, with the accent on custom woodwork, are offered at Peachtree Point in Moorestown. Maines & Simpson Inc. (Steward "Gub" Maines 3d and Paul Simpson) and Robert Maines are building houses that exceed 3,000 square feet of living space and $350,000 in price. Forty houses on two- to five-acre lots are planned for the site, which includes a section of the Rancocas Creek. To date, the largest house is close to 5,000 square feet, and the most expensive cost about $425,000.
REAL_ESTATE
January 24, 1986 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Longview Lane, Marlborough Township, Chester County 459-5500. In the midst of the historic Brandywine area of Chester County, custom, single-family houses are under construction at Longview Lane. The 44-acre development is adjacent to, and takes its name from, the renowned Longwood Gardens. The site plan calls for the 23 houses of Longview Lane to be located along one slightly curving lane that ends in a cul-de-sac. Surrounding the site are horse farms, other single houses and about 108 acres of Longwood Gardens, including a bird sanctuary.
REAL_ESTATE
July 19, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Estates at Stone Ridge, Buckingham Township, Bucks County To say that 12 standard designs are offered by DeLuca Enterprises Inc. at the Estates at Stone Ridge is misleading. In fact, calling any home at Stone Ridge "standard" is understatement at the least. Priced well above a half-million dollars each, the homes in this new community are really custom designed - even the "standard" ones are being completely customized to each buyer's needs and desires. For example, the Aspen design proved to be but a starting point for the home of Chanchal Khanna, a pathologist, and her husband, Om, a surgeon.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. looks for clues, he usually looks under the rug. In his latest case, he examined the rug itself. Such diligent detective work was what helped break The Case of the Tricky Toupe, in which an establishment selling hair replacements called The Hairmakers wasn't, well, making hair. Preate's office said yesterday that The Hairmakers, with stores in Center City and King of Prussia, stated in sales contracts that its hairpieces were "custom-made" when in fact they were stock hairpieces previously manufactured to standard sizes.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
M ELISSA D'AGOSTINO, 32, of Germantown, uses hand-dyeing techniques to create her artsy women's-wear line. D'Agostino Fashion Textile Design also custom-made Philadelphia first lady Lisa Nutter's formal dress for President Obama's inaugural ball. Q: What's your background? A:I'm a graduate of Moore College of Art & Design. I was formerly a hand-block fabric printer at a textile-and-lighting studio. My textiles started as works of art and wall hangings, and the fabrics evolved into products I could sell.
SPORTS
October 17, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Steve Behrle will some day work for his father. Yesterday, he went to work on Malvern Prep's offense. Behrle, a 5-10, 185-pound senior linebacker, collected eight tackles and two sacks and forced a fumble - recovered by lineman Mark Muraglia and converted into the game's final touchdown - as Episcopal Academy, the heavy preseason favorite, muffled the host Friars, 24-0, in an Inter-Ac League opener. Actually, Behrle - it rhymes with Merrill - already works for his father.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert A. Hopf, 75, a retired custom-home builder who had a great interest in sports, died Saturday at his home in Jenkintown after a long illness. Mr. Hopf founded Robert A. Hopf Builders in 1950, and built customized houses in the Somerton and Bustleton sections of Philadelphia, Huntingdon Valley in Montgomery County, and Newtown Township and Washington Crossing in Bucks County. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he was a member of the Jenkintown Zoning Hearing Board. Mr. Hopf was born in New York City and reared in Philadelphia, graduating from Frankford High School in 1940.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | BY DAVE BARRY
As a widely respected foreign correspondent, I recently felt the need to travel to Germany so I could observe firsthand the front lines of this dangerous all-dominating worldwide struggle we have come to know as the Cold War. At least that's what I'm going to tell the Internal Revenue Service. The truth is, I went to Germany because this is the year I turn 40, and I felt the need to be surrounded by the largest possible quantity of beer. They are very good at beer, the Germans, and what is more, they tend to serve it in vessels the size of municipal stadiums.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Guido B. Muscelli, 101, one of the owners and operators of Muscelli Brothers Clothing Manufacturers, in South Philadelphia, for 70 years, died Sunday at Zurbrugg Hospital, Willingboro. Mr. Muscelli died on his birthday and had enjoyed sound health until about a month ago. He had lived in South Jersey for the last 10 years and at the Burlington Woods Convalescent Center, in Burlington Township, for the last five years. Mr. Muscelli was born in Italy, where he learned to sew. He came to the United States at age 16. He entered the country through Ellis Island and settled in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
Rafeal "Flash" Vasquez is in the driver's seat of a sleeksilver Nissan he calls "La Cura," which in Spanish means The Cure. Trembling with hundreds of iron horses under its hood, the car nudges forward, block by block, turning heads and drawing crowds. Finally, it parks at the corner of Cambria and Franklin streets in the heart of North Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community. Vasquez, 23, steps out of the car's blue-steel interior and slowly lifts its hatchback. Almost instantly, the neighborhood of rowhouses, corner groceries and auto body shops is transformed into an open-air nightclub beneath the setting sun. Under the hatchback of Vasquez's heavily customized 1984 Sentra, in a handmade wooden cabinet, is a bank of 10 public-address-system-sized speakers, each electronically screaming the Latin strains of Frankie Ruiz, Raphy Leavitt and an assortment of New York rappers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 19, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A California man who says he was fired by PricewaterhouseCoopers L.L.P. after complaining about overcharges on his Comcast Corp. bills filed a federal lawsuit late Thursday against the cable giant for defamation, violating his privacy, and other claims. Conal O'Rourke, 50, is seeking more than $1 million in damages. He claims in the lawsuit that Comcast researched his background and learned of his employment with the accounting and auditing firm after he complained to Comcast officials in Philadelphia about billing irregularities that included $312.50 in overcharges and $2,000 in equipment he had not ordered.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast Philadelphia barbershop owner who was shot four times at his store Monday night told police the man who shot him had first asked for a haircut, police said. Just before 9 p.m. Monday, police arrived at Castor's Finest Barbershop on the 7100 block of Castor Avenue, where they found the shop's owner suffering from gunshot wounds to the chest, thigh, and shoulder, and a graze wound to the head. The victim, 33, told police a man had come into the store and asked for a haircut, police said.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Mary Atkinson and son David opened their flower stand Sunday at the Haddon Heights Farmers Market, the late-season zinnias, dahlias, and sunflowers seemed as bright as the morning's light. "My husband would have wanted us to finish [the season] strong," Mary said from behind the work table, a big plastic bucket of special, single-stem blooms at the ready. A free flower for every kid was Lewis J. Atkinson's idea. A big, beaming bear of a guy, he was only 58 when he died, unexpectedly, Sept.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northern California man who says he was fired after Comcast Corp. contacted his employer wants his name cleared and has threatened to file a lawsuit next week against the cable giant, his lawyer, Maureen Pettibone Ryan, said Thursday. The case of Conal O'Rourke, of Santa Clara, is Comcast's latest customer service fiasco to go viral as the nation's largest cable company seeks regulatory approval for its $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. After being unable to resolve a billing problem in California, O'Rourke contacted Comcast's headquarters in Philadelphia twice in February about $312.50 in overcharges, Ryan said in a phone interview.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
If any customer is qualified to judge whether changes at the Pennsylvania Convention Center are working, it's Sandy Vura Harwood, vice president of meetings for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Starting Wednesday, she will be in charge of making sure that 6,500 doctors, scientists, epidemiologists, and professors gathered in Philadelphia for IDWeek enjoy their experience at a five-day convention worth an estimated $19 million in economic impact to the region. "It remains to be seen" whether the changes will make a difference, Harwood said Monday, shortly before the all-hands-on-deck meeting of technical, hotel, security, and operations representatives assigned to make the convention run smoothly.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wendy and Ryan Rowe had one goal when they visited Sundance Vacations' offices in King of Prussia on a hot day in July 2009: getting a voucher for the free cruise the company promised in return for listening to its sales pitch. Whatever else Sundance offered, they were braced for a hard sell and planned to say no. But they left with something extra, anyway: a signed contract with the Wilkes-Barre lodging-package marketer. One salesman called it a "savings account on vacations" - an appealing idea to newlyweds already planning a family.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Getting through U.S. Customs checkpoints can be irritating at peak travel times, but some passengers arriving at Philadelphia International Airport got an extra dose of angst this week. New automated passport kiosks, designed to expedite the entry process, had a technology glitch. They didn't work for a while Tuesday afternoon and had to be rebooted at a busy time, when many US Airways and American Airlines flights were arriving from Europe. Travelers who had just spent from seven to nine hours in the air became frustrated, and anger boiled up because many had connecting flights.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
After an epic breakdown in customer service this summer, Comcast Corp. has appointed a fast-rising executive, Charlie Herrin, to a new position with broad powers to fix Comcast's relationship with its customers. Herrin, 44, ran the team that developed Comcast's interactive X1 TV guide. He now has been named senior vice president of customer experience. Herrin joins Tom Karinshak, senior vice president for customer service, and Patrick O'Hare, senior vice president of field operations, in a sector of Comcast business with more than 50 call centers and tens of thousands of customer service employees and technicians.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Connecticut gas utilities owned by the would-be buyer of Philadelphia Gas Works scored below average for customer satisfaction in their inaugural evaluations by J.D. Power & Associates, the market research firm. Connecticut Natural Gas and Southern Connecticut Gas, owned by UIL Holdings Corp. of New Haven, were ranked slightly below the average score for 12 medium-size Eastern gas utilities in J.D. Power's annual survey. The UIL utilities scored well on corporate citizenship and field service, but lagged in billing/payment and customer service, according to John Hazen, a senior director with the research firm.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 83 years repairing shoes, since he was recruited off a Camden sidewalk at age 11, James Spinelli, 94, is retiring this month and closing Quaker Shoe Repair in Haddonfield. Only he's not sure he can stay retired. He believed all these decades that he was living a useful life, saving soles, but little noticed by the world. He is a shoe man who kept to his shop, literally living upstairs. But the outpouring of love from customers since he announced his retirement has been so surprising to him, so gratifying, that he's not certain he can walk away.
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