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REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 1987 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Peachtree Point Moorestown (609) 235-1950 Finely detailed, custom-built houses, with the accent on custom woodwork, are offered at Peachtree Point in Moorestown. Maines & Simpson Inc. (Steward "Gub" Maines 3d and Paul Simpson) and Robert Maines are building houses that exceed 3,000 square feet of living space and $350,000 in price. Forty houses on two- to five-acre lots are planned for the site, which includes a section of the Rancocas Creek. To date, the largest house is close to 5,000 square feet, and the most expensive cost about $425,000.
REAL_ESTATE
January 24, 1986 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Longview Lane, Marlborough Township, Chester County 459-5500. In the midst of the historic Brandywine area of Chester County, custom, single-family houses are under construction at Longview Lane. The 44-acre development is adjacent to, and takes its name from, the renowned Longwood Gardens. The site plan calls for the 23 houses of Longview Lane to be located along one slightly curving lane that ends in a cul-de-sac. Surrounding the site are horse farms, other single houses and about 108 acres of Longwood Gardens, including a bird sanctuary.
REAL_ESTATE
July 19, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Estates at Stone Ridge, Buckingham Township, Bucks County To say that 12 standard designs are offered by DeLuca Enterprises Inc. at the Estates at Stone Ridge is misleading. In fact, calling any home at Stone Ridge "standard" is understatement at the least. Priced well above a half-million dollars each, the homes in this new community are really custom designed - even the "standard" ones are being completely customized to each buyer's needs and desires. For example, the Aspen design proved to be but a starting point for the home of Chanchal Khanna, a pathologist, and her husband, Om, a surgeon.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. looks for clues, he usually looks under the rug. In his latest case, he examined the rug itself. Such diligent detective work was what helped break The Case of the Tricky Toupe, in which an establishment selling hair replacements called The Hairmakers wasn't, well, making hair. Preate's office said yesterday that The Hairmakers, with stores in Center City and King of Prussia, stated in sales contracts that its hairpieces were "custom-made" when in fact they were stock hairpieces previously manufactured to standard sizes.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
M ELISSA D'AGOSTINO, 32, of Germantown, uses hand-dyeing techniques to create her artsy women's-wear line. D'Agostino Fashion Textile Design also custom-made Philadelphia first lady Lisa Nutter's formal dress for President Obama's inaugural ball. Q: What's your background? A:I'm a graduate of Moore College of Art & Design. I was formerly a hand-block fabric printer at a textile-and-lighting studio. My textiles started as works of art and wall hangings, and the fabrics evolved into products I could sell.
SPORTS
October 17, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Steve Behrle will some day work for his father. Yesterday, he went to work on Malvern Prep's offense. Behrle, a 5-10, 185-pound senior linebacker, collected eight tackles and two sacks and forced a fumble - recovered by lineman Mark Muraglia and converted into the game's final touchdown - as Episcopal Academy, the heavy preseason favorite, muffled the host Friars, 24-0, in an Inter-Ac League opener. Actually, Behrle - it rhymes with Merrill - already works for his father.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert A. Hopf, 75, a retired custom-home builder who had a great interest in sports, died Saturday at his home in Jenkintown after a long illness. Mr. Hopf founded Robert A. Hopf Builders in 1950, and built customized houses in the Somerton and Bustleton sections of Philadelphia, Huntingdon Valley in Montgomery County, and Newtown Township and Washington Crossing in Bucks County. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he was a member of the Jenkintown Zoning Hearing Board. Mr. Hopf was born in New York City and reared in Philadelphia, graduating from Frankford High School in 1940.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | BY DAVE BARRY
As a widely respected foreign correspondent, I recently felt the need to travel to Germany so I could observe firsthand the front lines of this dangerous all-dominating worldwide struggle we have come to know as the Cold War. At least that's what I'm going to tell the Internal Revenue Service. The truth is, I went to Germany because this is the year I turn 40, and I felt the need to be surrounded by the largest possible quantity of beer. They are very good at beer, the Germans, and what is more, they tend to serve it in vessels the size of municipal stadiums.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Guido B. Muscelli, 101, one of the owners and operators of Muscelli Brothers Clothing Manufacturers, in South Philadelphia, for 70 years, died Sunday at Zurbrugg Hospital, Willingboro. Mr. Muscelli died on his birthday and had enjoyed sound health until about a month ago. He had lived in South Jersey for the last 10 years and at the Burlington Woods Convalescent Center, in Burlington Township, for the last five years. Mr. Muscelli was born in Italy, where he learned to sew. He came to the United States at age 16. He entered the country through Ellis Island and settled in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
Rafeal "Flash" Vasquez is in the driver's seat of a sleeksilver Nissan he calls "La Cura," which in Spanish means The Cure. Trembling with hundreds of iron horses under its hood, the car nudges forward, block by block, turning heads and drawing crowds. Finally, it parks at the corner of Cambria and Franklin streets in the heart of North Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community. Vasquez, 23, steps out of the car's blue-steel interior and slowly lifts its hatchback. Almost instantly, the neighborhood of rowhouses, corner groceries and auto body shops is transformed into an open-air nightclub beneath the setting sun. Under the hatchback of Vasquez's heavily customized 1984 Sentra, in a handmade wooden cabinet, is a bank of 10 public-address-system-sized speakers, each electronically screaming the Latin strains of Frankie Ruiz, Raphy Leavitt and an assortment of New York rappers.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
A few thousand Vanguard investment customers thought they had made some extra bucks on Monday. But it turned out to be a software glitch: Vanguard account holders who were checking their balances on Apple iPhones, iPads, and Apple Watches - in short, anyone using an operating system on an Apple device - briefly experienced inflated values. "A few thousand out of our 20 million clients" were affected, according to Vanguard spokeswoman Katie Hirt. Hirt said 16 percent of customers who visit the company's website Vanguard.com do so through an Apple device and application.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Now that nearly all Peco Energy Co. customers have smart meters, more than a thousand commercial and industrial clients will be switched to hourly pricing on June 1, a potentially disruptive change in billing. The new pricing will affect medium-size commercial customers that do not shop for power from competitive suppliers. Rather than paying a flat per-kilowatt-hour charge, their price will now fluctuate hourly, depending on spot wholesale-market prices. The groundwork for the switch was set by Peco's installation of 1.7 million-plus smart meters, which allow it to measure usage at 15-minute intervals.
NEWS
April 26, 2016 | By Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic
As we waited in the airport for a plane back to Philadelphia recently, we glanced at our boarding passes and were pleasantly surprised to see Group 1 printed at the bottom. Group 1? We are usually in Group 4, along with the woman who forgot she has a 24-ounce bottle of shampoo in her purse. When the agent announced that the plane was ready for priority boarding, we got up from the plastic seats, ready to go. Then he welcomed those seated in first class. Then families with small children were "welcome to board.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
After being the Rodney Dangerfield of retail for so long, "plus size" customers are finally getting some respect. The plus-size sector is booming as women's apparel stores such as stalwart Lane Bryant and 15-year-old Torrid, which cater to women and girls who wear bigger sizes, typically 14 and up, reported sales growth last year. And what about that trio of Sports Illustrated covers for the magazine's 2016 swimsuit issue? One of them features - drum roll, please - plus-size model Ashley Graham, 28, who happens to be the face of Lane Bryant.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Atlantic City Electric announced Monday that its customers will receive a $113.16 credit on their bills in the next month, a one-time bonus for the completion of the merger between Exelon Corp. and Pepco Holdings Inc., the parent company of Atlantic City Electric. The credit will be automatically applied to each household with an active account. It is part of a $430 million package of benefits Exelon is paying to customers and communities of Pepco's utilities in New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Gas Works shut off Ruth Mathieu-Alce's service 14 months ago, after PGW workers discovered a suspicious device on the gas meter at her Lawncrest home. PGW said the power converter tampered with the meter by emitting a magnetic force that caused it to dramatically underreport fuel usage. Mathieu-Alce proclaimed her innocence and filed a complaint with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. On Thursday, the PUC upheld an administrative law judge's finding that PGW had failed to prove that the power adapter caused her meter to run slowly.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Delmarva Power residential customers can expect to pay 2.6 percent less this year for electricity, reflecting lower regional wholesale-power prices received during recent supply auctions, the Delaware Public Service Commission announced Tuesday. The lower prices will affect only those customers who receive the utility's standard offer for power, not customers who have chosen a competitive supplier. The typical bill for small commercial customers who get the utility's standard offer will decline about 3.9 percent.
NEWS
February 27, 2016
ISSUE | COMCAST Customers No. 1 I found it laughable but par for the course that Comcast would offer a small credit for an outage with catch-22 conditions. You had to have 1) called, 2) tweeted, or 3) chatted on its website ("Comcast $2 outage credit," Saturday), as though it weren't obvious that their system had crashed. The third option is the most ironic, as I watched that swirling "I'm thinking" icon on my screen for 20 minutes at a shot, only to be returned to the previous page.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
For the second time in a month, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission ordered Thursday a hearing on a customer complaint that a Peco Energy Co. smart meter is responsible for a health problem. By a 4-1 vote, the PUC rejected an administrative law judge's recommendation to dismiss the complaint of Stephen and Diane Van Schoyck of Langhorne and sent the case back for a hearing on the couple's assertion that they have experienced health problems and difficulty sleeping since Peco installed a smart meter in 2015.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
With five kids, Stevie Lucas was tired of the floor under her kitchen table always being dirty. She tried rugs, but the chair legs would catch. So in 2010, Lucas, of Media, hired an artist to stencil a cream-colored design on the hardwood under the table to differentiate that space from the rest of the floor. The process took about a week. "This was such a great solution for under a table because it's so easy to maintain," Lucas said. "The chairs don't catch on it, it can be cleaned very easily, and it looks beautiful.
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