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REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 1987 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Peachtree Point Moorestown (609) 235-1950 Finely detailed, custom-built houses, with the accent on custom woodwork, are offered at Peachtree Point in Moorestown. Maines & Simpson Inc. (Steward "Gub" Maines 3d and Paul Simpson) and Robert Maines are building houses that exceed 3,000 square feet of living space and $350,000 in price. Forty houses on two- to five-acre lots are planned for the site, which includes a section of the Rancocas Creek. To date, the largest house is close to 5,000 square feet, and the most expensive cost about $425,000.
REAL_ESTATE
January 24, 1986 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Longview Lane, Marlborough Township, Chester County 459-5500. In the midst of the historic Brandywine area of Chester County, custom, single-family houses are under construction at Longview Lane. The 44-acre development is adjacent to, and takes its name from, the renowned Longwood Gardens. The site plan calls for the 23 houses of Longview Lane to be located along one slightly curving lane that ends in a cul-de-sac. Surrounding the site are horse farms, other single houses and about 108 acres of Longwood Gardens, including a bird sanctuary.
REAL_ESTATE
July 19, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Estates at Stone Ridge, Buckingham Township, Bucks County To say that 12 standard designs are offered by DeLuca Enterprises Inc. at the Estates at Stone Ridge is misleading. In fact, calling any home at Stone Ridge "standard" is understatement at the least. Priced well above a half-million dollars each, the homes in this new community are really custom designed - even the "standard" ones are being completely customized to each buyer's needs and desires. For example, the Aspen design proved to be but a starting point for the home of Chanchal Khanna, a pathologist, and her husband, Om, a surgeon.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
M ELISSA D'AGOSTINO, 32, of Germantown, uses hand-dyeing techniques to create her artsy women's-wear line. D'Agostino Fashion Textile Design also custom-made Philadelphia first lady Lisa Nutter's formal dress for President Obama's inaugural ball. Q: What's your background? A:I'm a graduate of Moore College of Art & Design. I was formerly a hand-block fabric printer at a textile-and-lighting studio. My textiles started as works of art and wall hangings, and the fabrics evolved into products I could sell.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. looks for clues, he usually looks under the rug. In his latest case, he examined the rug itself. Such diligent detective work was what helped break The Case of the Tricky Toupe, in which an establishment selling hair replacements called The Hairmakers wasn't, well, making hair. Preate's office said yesterday that The Hairmakers, with stores in Center City and King of Prussia, stated in sales contracts that its hairpieces were "custom-made" when in fact they were stock hairpieces previously manufactured to standard sizes.
SPORTS
October 17, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Steve Behrle will some day work for his father. Yesterday, he went to work on Malvern Prep's offense. Behrle, a 5-10, 185-pound senior linebacker, collected eight tackles and two sacks and forced a fumble - recovered by lineman Mark Muraglia and converted into the game's final touchdown - as Episcopal Academy, the heavy preseason favorite, muffled the host Friars, 24-0, in an Inter-Ac League opener. Actually, Behrle - it rhymes with Merrill - already works for his father.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Robert A. Hopf, 75, a retired custom-home builder who had a great interest in sports, died Saturday at his home in Jenkintown after a long illness. Mr. Hopf founded Robert A. Hopf Builders in 1950, and built customized houses in the Somerton and Bustleton sections of Philadelphia, Huntingdon Valley in Montgomery County, and Newtown Township and Washington Crossing in Bucks County. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he was a member of the Jenkintown Zoning Hearing Board. Mr. Hopf was born in New York City and reared in Philadelphia, graduating from Frankford High School in 1940.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | BY DAVE BARRY
As a widely respected foreign correspondent, I recently felt the need to travel to Germany so I could observe firsthand the front lines of this dangerous all-dominating worldwide struggle we have come to know as the Cold War. At least that's what I'm going to tell the Internal Revenue Service. The truth is, I went to Germany because this is the year I turn 40, and I felt the need to be surrounded by the largest possible quantity of beer. They are very good at beer, the Germans, and what is more, they tend to serve it in vessels the size of municipal stadiums.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Guido B. Muscelli, 101, one of the owners and operators of Muscelli Brothers Clothing Manufacturers, in South Philadelphia, for 70 years, died Sunday at Zurbrugg Hospital, Willingboro. Mr. Muscelli died on his birthday and had enjoyed sound health until about a month ago. He had lived in South Jersey for the last 10 years and at the Burlington Woods Convalescent Center, in Burlington Township, for the last five years. Mr. Muscelli was born in Italy, where he learned to sew. He came to the United States at age 16. He entered the country through Ellis Island and settled in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
Rafeal "Flash" Vasquez is in the driver's seat of a sleeksilver Nissan he calls "La Cura," which in Spanish means The Cure. Trembling with hundreds of iron horses under its hood, the car nudges forward, block by block, turning heads and drawing crowds. Finally, it parks at the corner of Cambria and Franklin streets in the heart of North Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community. Vasquez, 23, steps out of the car's blue-steel interior and slowly lifts its hatchback. Almost instantly, the neighborhood of rowhouses, corner groceries and auto body shops is transformed into an open-air nightclub beneath the setting sun. Under the hatchback of Vasquez's heavily customized 1984 Sentra, in a handmade wooden cabinet, is a bank of 10 public-address-system-sized speakers, each electronically screaming the Latin strains of Frankie Ruiz, Raphy Leavitt and an assortment of New York rappers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The names some cable customers are being called after contacts with the companies that provide them services can be staggeringly profane: scatological and sexual, with allusions to body parts and perverted acts. They are often mailings of things like bills. Almost all of the names defy mention in a news story, but for some sense of it, here is one of the more temperate ones, received by a female Comcast customer: Super Bitch, which was first reported in the Chicago Tribune earlier this month.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gripping his TV remote, Bob Klewans, 75, wandered into the Xfinity store on South Columbus Boulevard one recent afternoon. Unlike in years past, he was met by a Comcast greeter and chatted up by one of the store's managers. He had a problem with his remote, he said, flourishing it. They talked, and Klewans was told he could get a new one. Klewans, a retiree who seemed happy for the friendly interaction, gushed about his treatment and the remodeled store, one of the busiest in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Pity the beleaguered Comcast phone reps. Sure, their jobs aren't up there with logging or roofing - the kind that usually make lists as the most dangerous in America. Besides, let's be clear: We're talking about call-center jobs that aren't even always in America. Isn't the Internet a wonder? But judging from my swamped inbox after last Sunday's column about a three-week Comcast flub, and last week's strange tale of a customer whose name was replaced on his account with a seven-letter epithet, "Comcast phone rep" is starting to look like a gig worth hazardous-duty pay. Unless you're immune to psychological pain, how often can you blithely tell people that you're really, truly sorry the company missed an appointment, can't seem to fix a billing error, or insist on transferring fed-up clients to "customer retention" when they just want to cancel?
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.'s national reputation for shaky customer service was rocked again Thursday, and in a particularly unseemly and profane fashion. A customer in Spokane, Wash., said the cable-TV giant changed his first name on his bill and his online account after he canceled his cable service because of financial hardships. A worker substituted his actual first name, Ricardo, with a vulgarity in its billing system. Charles Herrin, senior vice president for Comcast customer experience, personally apologized to the Browns in a phone call and said Thursday in a blog posting that it was an "unacceptable situation.
NEWS
January 24, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
By tracking their customers' purchases of burritos, purses, and camping equipment, two former Capital One employees made a stock market killing - nearly $1 million a year. The only problem, U.S. securities regulators say, is that the unusual scheme devised by the credit-card company's fraud investigators broke federal insider-trading rules. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed suit this week against Bonan Huang, a 32-year-old Chinese national residing in Glen Allen, Va., and Nuan Huang, 36, of Richmond, Va., both of whom have since lost their jobs.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chicago resident Keith Santangelo has filed a federal lawsuit against Comcast, claiming that the company took a $50 deposit in lieu of a credit check when he signed up for Internet service but then did a credit check on him anyway. The suit claims the company's action violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act and seeks class action status. Comcast had no comment on the pending litigation. A Comcast spokeswoman says that its policy is to take a deposit, typically $50, when a person declines to allow a credit check.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly half of food-borne-illness outbreaks are linked to restaurant food. The microbes that cause them are invisible and taste just fine. So how can you lower your odds of getting sick? "Go look at the bathroom," suggests Ken Gruen, a retired Philadelphia restaurant inspector ("sanitarian") who advises food establishments at Philadelphia International Airport. "If the bathroom is kept in good condition - it's clean, there is soap, there are paper towels, there is not a lot of litter on the floor - probably the kitchen is the same.
REAL_ESTATE
January 4, 2015 | By Laura Hoover, For The Inquirer
Standing in her small kitchen, Kelly Adomsky closed her eyes and imagined emptying the dishwasher. She envisioned where her two boys would play as she cooked dinner. She thought about where she would entertain. To prepare for the renovation of her growing family's home, Adomsky, a stay-at-home mother and former advertising professional, thought about every detail. The 1,700-square-foot, three-bedroom ranch in Doylestown Township, which her husband, Jonathan, had bought before they were married, had issues.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether the miracle of the first Hanukkah is fact or legend - oil enough for just one day is said to have burned in the Temple lamps for eight - not all Jews agree. But devoutly orthodox Rabbi Abraham Shemtov believes in miracles, and why not? Forty years ago he witnessed a kind of Hanukkah miracle, right on Independence Mall. Better yet, he helped create it, and has watched it spread around the world. On Dec. 14, 1974, Shemtov and four other men of the Lubavitcher sect of Hasidic Judaism gathered on Independence Mall to light what is thought to be the first menorah, or Hanukkah candelabrum, ever illuminated on public property in the world.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two California residents have sued Comcast Corp. over its plan to create a national WiFi network through Xfinity wireless routers, claiming it would drive up electric costs for subscribers, slow Internet speeds, and pose security risks. The suit, filed in federal court in Northern California, seeks class-action status and says Comcast wants to compete with wireless companies with its WiFi network, which relies heavily on routers in Xfinity subscribers' homes. Comcast said Friday that it disagrees with the allegations in the suit and asserts that the WiFi home hot-spot program "provides real benefits to our customers" because of the low cost of WiFi downloads compared with cellular downloads.
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