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BUSINESS
February 17, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
An $8,500 Merchants Fund grant has "launched" custom bookbinder Bella Forte on a path of global growth. Diane Mastrull's Small Business.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | BY PETER MUCHA, 215-854-4342, pmucha@phillynews.com
B OOB TUBE gets a new spin Sunday with the debut of a bra-shop show titled "Double Divas. " We're sure you get the "double" entendre . "Our job is to really help women feel wonderful," said Molly Hopkins, co-owner of LiviRae Lingerie in Atlanta. "All you gotta do is bring out the sexy stuff. " What, is the Lifetime Network trying to lure male viewers? Not exactly. This is no "Victoria's Secret Fashion Show. " Yes, judging from previews, some shapely knockouts will strut about in undergarments, but viewers will also see much, much bigger sets of challenges.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/DAILY NEWS
Dentaurum Inc. booth (above) displays a variety of orthodontic appliances during the Middle Atlantic Society of Orthodontists Convention at the Adam's Mark Hotel. At right are some orthodontic custom designs of Pro-Pal.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | Michael Hinkelman, Daily News columnist
Brian Lipstein, 28, of Manayunk, is CEO of Henry A. Davidsen Master Tailors & Image Consultants, which he founded in 2006. From a shop on 17th Street near Spruce, the Penn graduate creates a custom-tailored look that fits the image a client wants to project. Clients have included Flyers coach Peter Laviolette, former Eagle Ron Jaworski and radio/TV personality Danny Bonaduce. Q: How did you come up with the idea for the company? A: I started selling high-end custom suits for $2,500.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Todd Buchanan
With autumn comes the tradition of apple cider freshly pressed by small operations such as Solebury Orchard, which makes its own cider and custom- presses for other orchards. Working out of a small garage near New Hope, Brian Smith, the owner, and Steve Elliott produce from 500 to 2,000 gallons per press.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most businesspeople have to pay to get their advertising message out. Bernie Moeller has people clamoring to buy his ads from him. He's the proprietor and artist of Bernie's Tattooing, at the dead end of West Avenue in Bristol Township, and frankly he has never had much of a budget for advertising in 14 years in the business. "I just give out a few T-shirts and word-of-mouth. That's it," Bernie says. There's no way Bernie could avoid generating a lot of word-of-mouth, as a matter of fact, because he is a striking sight.
REAL_ESTATE
March 16, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
If you subtract January and February, 2014 promises to be a better year for the area's small builders - the ones who build a few spec and custom homes annually, often with one or two full-time employees and a handful of subcontractors. Though they stand in line behind the big guys for building lots and financing, they make a go of things just the same. "I just wish this winter had happened three years ago, when I was doing nothing," said Camden County builder Charles Kojeski, champing at an icy bit to finish five houses he has under construction.
NEWS
December 30, 1986
The Civic Center management, in its infinite wisdom, has directed the custom-car, van and motorcycle show (as it was known) to eliminate motorcycles from the show. When this piece of information reached me I was immediately disappointed. My disappointment quickly changed to curiosity, so I called World of Wheels, which coordinates the show, and asked why. The answer was, "The Civic Center management does not want bikers at the show. " I do not like to be labeled a biker and discriminated against by some middle-management bureaucrat who does not know the difference between a custom-motorcycle hobbyist and a "biker.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
If Philadelphia were a font, what would it look like? The Phillies logo? Maybe something like the Germanic Fraktur font used by the Pennsylvania Dutch? Surely there'd be an element of colonial-era history and maybe some whiffs of contemporary branding. (Wawa? Comcast?) Infusing the character of a big city into tiny letters is no small project. Even more daunting might be justifying why such an endeavor even matters. But these are the challenges faced by Robbie de Villiers and Jeremy Dooley, two typeface designers in Chattanooga, Tenn., who are developing a custom, city typeface.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
C AROLYN BRANDHORST, 49, of Old City, recently relocated her family business, the Papery, from 3rd and Arch streets to Locust near 12th, after a decade. The new space, next to the restaurant Vedge, has enabled Brandhorst to reinvent the store as a custom-design studio for wedding and party invitations, in addition to the more-familiar retail aspects of stationery and gifts. Q: You moved the business to the trendy area now called Midtown Village. Why? A: Our business model changed and we became a custom-invitation studio, and the old store wasn't designed to keep up with the work.
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