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NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By Tom Stoelker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A little more than 20 years ago, Bridget Morris was set to embark on a career as an interior designer. But during a semester in Italy, papermaking and book restoration stole her away. She dropped out of Philadelphia University and returned to Cortona, Italy, for two years to study the craft. When she came back to Philadelphia, Morris worked from 1991 to 1996 at William H. Allen, Bookseller, on Walnut Street, toiling beneath a multicolored crystal chandelier on rare volumes in Greek and Latin.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/DAILY NEWS
Dentaurum Inc. booth (above) displays a variety of orthodontic appliances during the Middle Atlantic Society of Orthodontists Convention at the Adam's Mark Hotel. At right are some orthodontic custom designs of Pro-Pal.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ron "Boots" Nissenbaum 's industrial canvas-maker, Humphrys-CoverSports , at 5000 Paschall Ave. in Southwest Philly, counts Major League Baseball 's Reds , Twins , and Orioles as clients. But this winter the 65-employee company has won its biggest big-league order yet - to cover the Phillies field at Citizens Bank Park. The Phils have ordered a full-size infield tarp, with grommets and handles, made of web-reinforced white polyethylene, 175 feet on each side and big enough to cover a block of rowhouses.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
C AROLYN BRANDHORST, 49, of Old City, recently relocated her family business, the Papery, from 3rd and Arch streets to Locust near 12th, after a decade. The new space, next to the restaurant Vedge, has enabled Brandhorst to reinvent the store as a custom-design studio for wedding and party invitations, in addition to the more-familiar retail aspects of stationery and gifts. Q: You moved the business to the trendy area now called Midtown Village. Why? A: Our business model changed and we became a custom-invitation studio, and the old store wasn't designed to keep up with the work.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Todd Buchanan
With autumn comes the tradition of apple cider freshly pressed by small operations such as Solebury Orchard, which makes its own cider and custom- presses for other orchards. Working out of a small garage near New Hope, Brian Smith, the owner, and Steve Elliott produce from 500 to 2,000 gallons per press.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most businesspeople have to pay to get their advertising message out. Bernie Moeller has people clamoring to buy his ads from him. He's the proprietor and artist of Bernie's Tattooing, at the dead end of West Avenue in Bristol Township, and frankly he has never had much of a budget for advertising in 14 years in the business. "I just give out a few T-shirts and word-of-mouth. That's it," Bernie says. There's no way Bernie could avoid generating a lot of word-of-mouth, as a matter of fact, because he is a striking sight.
REAL_ESTATE
March 16, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
If you subtract January and February, 2014 promises to be a better year for the area's small builders - the ones who build a few spec and custom homes annually, often with one or two full-time employees and a handful of subcontractors. Though they stand in line behind the big guys for building lots and financing, they make a go of things just the same. "I just wish this winter had happened three years ago, when I was doing nothing," said Camden County builder Charles Kojeski, champing at an icy bit to finish five houses he has under construction.
NEWS
December 30, 1986
The Civic Center management, in its infinite wisdom, has directed the custom-car, van and motorcycle show (as it was known) to eliminate motorcycles from the show. When this piece of information reached me I was immediately disappointed. My disappointment quickly changed to curiosity, so I called World of Wheels, which coordinates the show, and asked why. The answer was, "The Civic Center management does not want bikers at the show. " I do not like to be labeled a biker and discriminated against by some middle-management bureaucrat who does not know the difference between a custom-motorcycle hobbyist and a "biker.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
THINKING "back to school" already? Gizmo Guy's been testing some useful new gadgets that could make your kid's school year better - if you don't keep and use them yourself!   Exercise your rights Collegiates can ward off the "freshman 15" (pounds) weight gain and otherwise keep stress in check with help from a Misfit Shine , a very cool, wrist-worn activity and sleep monitor. The Shine ($99) tracks walking, running, swimming (waterproof) and sleep patterns, showing your level of activity and also the current time with a minimalist halo of lights on its otherwise blank monitor "face.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2007
Frankford Avenue is to furniture what the Main Line is to plastic surgery: You want a custom job, there's an outfit that can handle it - from Morry's Dinettes (8109 Frankford Ave.) up near Pennypack Creek, which specializes in reupholstering dinette chairs, to Pappajohn Woodworking (4355 Orchard St.), near the El in Frankford, specializing in custom hardwood millwork, cabinets, and furniture that can run to the many thousands of dollars Summerdale Mills , next to Morry's at 8101 Frankford Ave., sells drapery and upholstery fabric to do-it-yourselfers and also builds custom-scaled sofas and chairs, sized as you like to fit odd spaces.
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