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NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Custom is lord of all mankind. " - Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin Pushkin sweated here. So did Chekhov and Maxim Gorki and the famed poet-military theorist Denis Davydov and scores of widely known Russian actors and cultural figures. They all flocked to the Sandunovsky Baths - the banya - to wash and cleanse themselves, to expiate the sins of rich food and copious drink with steam and leafy birch twigs, and the pleasurable shock of frigid bathing pools. They came to Sandunovsky to sweat, and they left the wooden planks of the steam rooms stained with their own potent perspiration.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
On the bandwagon With South Broad Street in the background, William Penn shows off his new custom-made Flyers jersey from atop City Hall yesterday.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | Elizabeth Wellington
Next door to the Old City fire station and Ben Franklin Park is a darling boutique with a timely fashion mission and a perfectly patriotic name. US*U.S. is a 600-square-foot designer co-op led by custom clothier Lele Tran that houses a practical mix of easy-to-wear clothing, including a boho-inspired children's line, bold-hued bikinis and a collection of Gothic couture wear featuring corsets and fitted skirts. But in addition to delivering this spring's latest colorful styles, US*U.S.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/DAILY NEWS
Dentaurum Inc. booth (above) displays a variety of orthodontic appliances during the Middle Atlantic Society of Orthodontists Convention at the Adam's Mark Hotel. At right are some orthodontic custom designs of Pro-Pal.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most businesspeople have to pay to get their advertising message out. Bernie Moeller has people clamoring to buy his ads from him. He's the proprietor and artist of Bernie's Tattooing, at the dead end of West Avenue in Bristol Township, and frankly he has never had much of a budget for advertising in 14 years in the business. "I just give out a few T-shirts and word-of-mouth. That's it," Bernie says. There's no way Bernie could avoid generating a lot of word-of-mouth, as a matter of fact, because he is a striking sight.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Todd Buchanan
With autumn comes the tradition of apple cider freshly pressed by small operations such as Solebury Orchard, which makes its own cider and custom- presses for other orchards. Working out of a small garage near New Hope, Brian Smith, the owner, and Steve Elliott produce from 500 to 2,000 gallons per press.
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By Tom Stoelker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A little more than 20 years ago, Bridget Morris was set to embark on a career as an interior designer. But during a semester in Italy, papermaking and book restoration stole her away. She dropped out of Philadelphia University and returned to Cortona, Italy, for two years to study the craft. When she came back to Philadelphia, Morris worked from 1991 to 1996 at William H. Allen, Bookseller, on Walnut Street, toiling beneath a multicolored crystal chandelier on rare volumes in Greek and Latin.
NEWS
December 30, 1986
The Civic Center management, in its infinite wisdom, has directed the custom-car, van and motorcycle show (as it was known) to eliminate motorcycles from the show. When this piece of information reached me I was immediately disappointed. My disappointment quickly changed to curiosity, so I called World of Wheels, which coordinates the show, and asked why. The answer was, "The Civic Center management does not want bikers at the show. " I do not like to be labeled a biker and discriminated against by some middle-management bureaucrat who does not know the difference between a custom-motorcycle hobbyist and a "biker.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
If Philadelphia were a font, what would it look like? The Phillies logo? Maybe something like the Germanic Fraktur font used by the Pennsylvania Dutch? Surely there'd be an element of colonial-era history and maybe some whiffs of contemporary branding. (Wawa? Comcast?) Infusing the character of a big city into tiny letters is no small project. Even more daunting might be justifying why such an endeavor even matters. But these are the challenges faced by Robbie de Villiers and Jeremy Dooley, two typeface designers in Chattanooga, Tenn., who are developing a custom, city typeface.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
C AROLYN BRANDHORST, 49, of Old City, recently relocated her family business, the Papery, from 3rd and Arch streets to Locust near 12th, after a decade. The new space, next to the restaurant Vedge, has enabled Brandhorst to reinvent the store as a custom-design studio for wedding and party invitations, in addition to the more-familiar retail aspects of stationery and gifts. Q: You moved the business to the trendy area now called Midtown Village. Why? A: Our business model changed and we became a custom-invitation studio, and the old store wasn't designed to keep up with the work.
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