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Cutbacks

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BUSINESS
February 27, 2009 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Sunday's expiration of their contract with Sunoco Inc. nears, workers at the company's Philadelphia and Marcus Hook refineries yesterday stepped up efforts to protest staffing cutbacks they say will endanger workers and nearby neighborhoods. Several hundred refinery workers rallied outside Philadelphia's City Hall, then marched to Sunoco's headquarters. Union officials said they presented petitions against the cutbacks signed by about 2,000 people who live near the refineries.
NEWS
June 4, 2003
RE the proposed SEPTA cutbacks: To discontinue the Route C bus would be a severe hardship on disabled people as they have no access via escalator or elevator at subway stations. There is enough automobile/truck traffic in Center City right now as it is. We do not need any more. Eliminate certain bus routes and train lines and you will have hundreds or thousands of people bringing their automobiles to work. We need to keep the trains plus the buses SEPTA plans to eliminate or this city will be like Los Angeles, where it takes an hour and a half for what should be a half-hour trip.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1991 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fischer & Porter Co., the Warminster maker of precision instruments, yesterday said it would take a $20 million after-tax restructuring charge in the fourth quarter and would make further reductions in its workforce. The company also said it expected a loss of $3 million in the fourth quarter and a loss of $5 million for the year, excluding the special charge. In a statement, the company said that $17 million of the $20 million charge was related to a restructuring plan the company developed after analyzing its businesses and operations.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | By Valeria M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Wearing a green athletic jacket, blond-haired Barbara Kelly hoisted a placard in the air and shouted its message: "Shoot baskets, not needles. " Kelly, who coaches girls' basketball and soccer for the Somerton Youth Organization, was one of about 300 parents, coaches and children who rallied outside the Northeast City Hall Annex yesterday to protest cutbacks in hours by the city and the School District for athletic teams that practice and play...
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Early last week, in an informal meeting with Mobil Research & Development Co. managers, union representatives were handed a proposal outlining tentative separation packages for the 107 union workers expected to be let go soon. Early retirement benefits and two weeks' severance pay for every year of service were among Mobil's offers, said Robert Campbell, president of Mobilab Union Inc. "It's obvious to us that a lot of time is going to go into this. We're just getting started," union spokesman Jack Clark said.
NEWS
November 15, 2010
THE MAYOR gets on television and says don't forget to change the batteries in your smoke detector. Then he goes around closing firehouses. Go figure that one out. Walt Van Horn, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 11, 1988 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Unionized city workers plan to march on City Hall on June 29, one day before their contract with the city expires and the mayor begins the process of eliminating 1,700 jobs. Meanwhile, leaders of the four labor unions representing city workers have already hit the street to protest the mayor's planned service and employee cutbacks. They called a press conference yesterday at the closed, litter-strewn Tip Top Playground at Front and Allen streets in Fishtown, charging that the site is an example of what Philadelphians can expect if those cutbacks come to pass.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After an 11-year dry spell, Penn Wood High School will be back in the business of staging musicals when it presents Little Shop of Horrors Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The school's last musical production was Gilbert and Sullivan's The Gondoliers, said Cheryl Brasch, choir director at the school and faculty adviser for the project. That was in 1987, the year before budget cutbacks silenced school musicals, Brasch said. In those cutbacks, she said, supplemental contracts for faculty advisers for musical and dramatic productions were abolished, and at the same time, the positions of band director and choir director were combined.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not long ago a salesman coming for a visit to Sioux Manufacturing Corp. here landed at Grand Forks and phoned for directions the rest of the way. "We said, 'You turn left at the second streetlight. Now, the second streetlight is 90 miles away.' . . . " Sioux's president, Carl McKay, chuckles as he recalls the story. Folks around here are used to great distances - for some, a round trip to the grocery store can be 50 miles or more. Fortunately there's an airport here with three flights a day from Minneapolis - normally a 10-hour drive - which means just about anybody anywhere can get here pretty easily.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
Has Gov. Corbett gone too far with cutbacks in Pennsylvania welfare programs?
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NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia Orphans' Court judge on Wednesday said a group that includes Girard College alumni, parents, and students does not have the legal right to object to Girard's plans to end its high school and boarding programs. Administrative Judge Joseph D. O'Keefe denied the group's request to intervene. He held two days of hearings on the petitioners' request in November. "We're disappointed in the outcome, but at the same time, we're gratified we got a chance to be heard," said Joseph Samuel, president of the 3,000-member Girard College Alumni Association.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Up, up and away, a great air show Atlantic City Airshow organizers deserve a lot of credit for continuing this 11-year tradition despite government budget cutbacks - as do the brave and amazing pilots (along with their sponsors) who flew ("Thunder was missed at A.C. Airshow," June 27). Pilots like Jim Beasley, Matt Chapman, Rob Howland, Dan McClung, and Bill Stein are in a league of their own. Along with other pilots, they pleased the crowd on the beach the other week. As for the use of slower aircraft, noise and speed aren't everything.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
After operating as a free private boarding school for poor children for 165 years, Girard College in North Philadelphia plans to temporarily end its residential and high school programs in the fall of 2014. The Board of Directors of City Trusts, which oversees Girard, voted unanimously Monday to ask Orphans' Court for permission to make the changes so it can cut operating costs, replenish shrinking reserves, and avert financial ruin. Reaction ranged from bitterness and outrage to sadness.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Senior Pentagon leaders are taking another look at sharply reducing the number of unpaid furlough days that department civilians will have to take in the coming months, suggesting they may be able to cut the number from 14 to as few as seven, defense officials said Thursday. If the number is reduced, it would be the second time the Pentagon has cut the number of furlough days. It had initially been set at 22 days. The officials say no decision has been made and that they are not ruling out efforts to drop the furloughs entirely.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Va. - The Pentagon for the first time is considering scaling back the massive buildup of drones it has overseen in the last few years, both to save money and to adapt to changing security threats and an increased focus on Asia as the Afghanistan war winds down. Air Force leaders are saying the military may already have enough unmanned aircraft systems to wage the wars of the future. And the Pentagon's shift to Asia will require a new mix of drones and other aircraft because countries in that region are better able to detect unmanned versions and shoot them down.
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Katie Zezima, Associated Press
HOBOKEN, N.J. - Brian McCarthy moved here from Manhattan last year and came to love his huge apartment and short train ride into New York. His boyfriend planned to move in this month. Now, the couple can't get out of Hoboken fast enough. Hurricane Sandy crippled the Port Authority Trans-Hudson line, a 24-hour subway that last year ferried 76.6 million passengers between Manhattan and New Jersey. The entire system was out for two weeks after the storm. A link to the World Trade Center was out for four weeks, and the Hoboken line just restored service last week.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Jon Cohen and Philip Rucker, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Most Americans want President Obama and congressional Republicans to compromise on a budget agreement, though they, too, are unhappy about the options that would avert the fiscal cliff, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. The strong support for compromise belies widespread public opposition to big spending cuts likely to be part of any deal. Most Americans oppose slashing spending on Medicaid and the military, as well as raising the age for Medicare eligibility and slowing the increase of Social Security benefits, all of which appear to be on the table in negotiations.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Andrew Taylor and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - With the government heading toward a year-end "fiscal cliff," House Republicans approved a full plate of Bush-era tax cuts Wednesday that they said could help shore up a still-frail national economy. At the same time, the Obama administration warned that threatened budget cuts could send some of America's troops into battle with less training. For all the action and talk, however, both taxes and spending were deeply enmeshed in campaign politics, with no resolution expected until after the elections.
NEWS
February 29, 2012
Are proposed delivery cutbacks and layoffs the right way to save the U.S. Postal Service?
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - With no financial relief in sight, the U.S. Postal Service is pushing ahead with planned cuts to more than 260 mail-processing centers around the nation, part of a billion-dollar cost-cutting effort that will slow delivery of first-class mail. In a statement Thursday, the cash-strapped agency said it had completed a review of closings to mail-processing centers it had proposed last fall. Based on community input and other factors, the post office said, it will move forward with consolidations involving virtually all of the 252 facilities on the list, as well as up to 12 new locations, beginning in mid-May.
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