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FOOD
January 21, 1987 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
When I was a kid growing up in the Midwest, the word "cutlet" had a very special and specific meaning. Cutlets were my very favorite cut of meat. They were always breaded with cracker crumbs, fried crisp and served with a heaping pile of mashed potatoes and lots of gravy. They were also always pork. More specifically, they were little nuggets of pork meat that came from either the temple of the pig's head or the cheek. The temple cutlets were the best, but both were wonderful. Cutlets of that kind are hard to find in today's marketplace, but cutlets of all other kinds are available everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
1 tablespoon olive oil ½ teaspoon each, chopped: fresh rosemary, thyme, and parsley Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 (3 ounces each) chicken cutlets ¾ cup marinara sauce ¼ cup shredded mozzarella Fresh basil, for garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. 2. Stir the oil and herbs in a small bowl to blend. Season with salt and pepper. Brush both sides of the cutlets with the herb oil. Heat a heavy, large ovenproof skillet over high heat. Add the cutlets and cook just until brown, about 2 minutes per side.
FOOD
August 24, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
One of Peking's more famous dishes is lamb, marinated in a mixture of soy sauce and sherry, stir-fried with garlic and scallions and finished with a simple, sweetened soy sauce. The whole process takes less than half an hour, yet the result is rich, full-flavored and satisfying. But suppose you don't like, can't find or can't afford lamb? Then consider an updated version of the dish made with convenient turkey cutlets. Turkey has enough flavor of its own to stand up to distinctive seasonings like garlic, scallions and sesame oil. The cutlets are available in most large supermarkets, and though they are more expensive than bone-in parts, they are still affordable.
FOOD
November 21, 2001 | By Sam Gugino FOR THE INQUIRER
Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday, especially when I can cook for family and friends. Maybe you feel the same way but have been so busy this fall that you still think it's October. Or maybe you just don't want to deal with all those leftovers, turkey sandwiches and turkey soup. Then this meal is for you: Thanksgiving dinner for four in 15 minutes. No prepping ahead of time. No leftovers. No frantic calls to the Meat and Poultry Hotline. ("Is my turkey still good if it's been frozen since the Reagan administration?"
FOOD
January 7, 1998 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! Here's a challenge: A new restaurant just opened. Paglia e Fieno, 937 E. Passyunk Ave., serves a dish called cotoletta principessa that is sheer delight. I would appreciate your help in getting the recipe. Theresa Cassello, Philadelphia Dear Theresa, Cotoletta principessa translates to veal cutlet "princess-style. " It's basically a variation of the longtime restaurant favorite, veal Oscar. The chef starts with a lightly breaded veal cutlet, covers it with a seafood stuffing and tops it with crabmeat, asparagus and mozzarella.
FOOD
May 17, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
In France, the skinless boneless breast of chicken is known as the "supreme. " Today, we've got some supreme ideas for preparing this choicest of poultry parts. With virtually no fat and less than 35 calories an ounce, white meat chicken is a superior selection for people watching their weight or cholesterol. While French chefs had to cut up whole chickens to get these prized poultry parts, American cooks can find them already skinned and boned in their supermarkets, labeled "chicken cutlets" or "chicken fillets.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By NORMA SCHONWETTER, Special to the Daily News
Two of the most memorable veal dishes I have prepared are Veal Zurichoise and Best-Ever Veal Parmesan. Veal Zurichoise prepared at the Post Hotel at Lake Louise in the Canadian Rockies delights the palate. This microwave version comes close to the original. The only thing lacking is the beautiful view of the snow-capped mountains. Our favorite veal dish is Veal Parmesan. I had been preparing it in the microwave with the use of a browning grill to brown the breaded cutlets. The recipe appeared in my column some time ago. Recently I discovered a better and faster way to do this and ended up with Best-Ever Veal Parmesan.
FOOD
September 13, 2012 | By Bonnie Benwick, Washington Post
Here's a quick alternative to grilling pork tenderloin: cut it into slices, then pound them into cutlets. Turn marinade ingredients into a glaze.   Curry-Glazed Pork 4 servings 3 cloves garlic 1/4 cup honey 2 tablespoons red curry paste 2 tablespoons tamari or wheat-free soy sauce 3 to 4 tablespoons olive oil 11/2 to 2 pounds pork tenderloin Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   1. Mince the garlic and place in medium bowl.
FOOD
July 19, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Tender yet crispy fried chicken cutlets are enough to turn even the simplest salad into a main dish. Serve them on a seasonal salad of tomatoes, cucumbers and carrots now, or shredded red cabbage, red onions, apples or avocado come fall. Crispy Chicken Salad (Makes 4 to 5 servings) 1. For the chicken , remove the tenderloin of each breast half. Butterfly each half for 8 cutlets and 4 tenderloins. Season with salt and pepper. 2. Set up the flour and egg. Mix the panko and Parmesan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 13, 2012 | By Bonnie Benwick, Washington Post
Here's a quick alternative to grilling pork tenderloin: cut it into slices, then pound them into cutlets. Turn marinade ingredients into a glaze.   Curry-Glazed Pork 4 servings 3 cloves garlic 1/4 cup honey 2 tablespoons red curry paste 2 tablespoons tamari or wheat-free soy sauce 3 to 4 tablespoons olive oil 11/2 to 2 pounds pork tenderloin Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   1. Mince the garlic and place in medium bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
1 tablespoon olive oil ½ teaspoon each, chopped: fresh rosemary, thyme, and parsley Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 (3 ounces each) chicken cutlets ¾ cup marinara sauce ¼ cup shredded mozzarella Fresh basil, for garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. 2. Stir the oil and herbs in a small bowl to blend. Season with salt and pepper. Brush both sides of the cutlets with the herb oil. Heat a heavy, large ovenproof skillet over high heat. Add the cutlets and cook just until brown, about 2 minutes per side.
NEWS
March 21, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Flaim family have been growing eggplants in the sandy Cumberland County soil of their Vineland farm for 76 years, nurturing tiny seedlings into five-foot-tall plants that bear more than 20 fruits each. Most will be sold as usual to wholesale buyers or at farmers' markets. This year, 15 percent will find their way into freezer cases in specialty stores and cafeterias throughout the region. For the last two seasons, the Flaims have been processing the eggplant as breaded cutlets in boxes with the state's Jersey Fresh label, which tells customers they are eating local and is generally reserved for fresh produce.
FOOD
September 10, 2009
You can obviously take Shank's out of the Italian Market - though the cramped new Center City edition of this luncheonette will never have the old neighborhood feeling of the Carpenter Street original. But as long as the founding Perri family's women are still cooking, you can't take the Italian Market soul out of Shank's menu. Bringing along the heart of this kitchen was the plan when new owner Marcello Ciurlino moved the popular lunch spot north this summer, and it's payed off with sandwiches that exude a genuine South Philly savor.
FOOD
April 17, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fifth and latest cookbook in Susie Fishbein's Kosher by Design series is Passover By Design - a collection of 172 Passover-adjusted recipes. More than 130 of the dishes are gluten-free and many are quick and easy. Honey and Pecan-Crusted Chicken with Apricot Chutney (Makes 6 servings) 1. For the chutney, mix the duck sauce and apricots; let stand for at least 1 hour. 2. Set oven to 400 degrees. 3. Lightly spray a cookie sheet with nonstick spray.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2003 | by LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
THINK HOTTEST dish in Philly's restaurants is a plateful of wasabi mashed potatoes? Think again. Spicier than four-alarm chili, steamier than pork dumplings, and zestier than a habanero, local hotties of haute cuisine can fire up your stove without ever lighting the pilot. Just in time for Valentine's Day and the Month of Love, five sexy culinary virtuosos - four sizzling hunks who know the way to a lady's heart is through her taste buds, and South Philly's foremost gourmet luncheonette seductress - offer up libido-increasing, heart-stirring, mouthwatering, never-fail recipes for love.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Used to be the most popular item on children's menus was the Texas Tommy, maybe grilled cheese, or spaghetti with one meatball. But today the clear winner for hungry little diners-out are chicken fingers. Kids don't even need to consult the menu. Some like to dip the nuggetlike strips in ketchup or mustard, but most just eat 'em plain. At Salumeria in the Reading Terminal Market, chef Laura Arena thinks kids might enjoy a jazzed-up version of chicken fingers that they could take to school for lunch.
FOOD
November 21, 2001 | By Sam Gugino FOR THE INQUIRER
Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday, especially when I can cook for family and friends. Maybe you feel the same way but have been so busy this fall that you still think it's October. Or maybe you just don't want to deal with all those leftovers, turkey sandwiches and turkey soup. Then this meal is for you: Thanksgiving dinner for four in 15 minutes. No prepping ahead of time. No leftovers. No frantic calls to the Meat and Poultry Hotline. ("Is my turkey still good if it's been frozen since the Reagan administration?"
NEWS
December 26, 1999 | By Vicki McClure, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Olen Carpenito turns cows and chickens into Philly cheesesteaks and deer into cutlets. The 25-year-old meat cutter and new owner of A&M Meats can also take those cute little pigs raised by local farmers and turn them into sausage, smoked ham or scrapple - whatever the customer requests. "Some people say I'm mean because I cut animals, but I'm not. I like animals," said Carpenito, who keeps four cats and two dogs as pets and grew up on a 50-acre farm tending sheep and chickens.
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