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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, FOR THE INQUIRER
With two Valentine's Day runs coming up, there's no reason you can't show your honey that you were born to run. On Feb. 13, the West Chester YMCA will hold its annual 5-K Sweetheart run. And the next day offers a chance to run a 3.7-mile loop around Cooper River Park in Pennsauken. But don't worry if you don't have a sweetheart to bring with you - you never know, he or she might be the Lycra-clad athlete running next to you. To help keep their organization active over the winter months, the folks at the Bicycle Club of Philadelphia will be offering cyclists a chance to trade in their bikes for cross-country skis on Feb. 13. Their bike-or-ski event will take place in Valley Forge Park and will be either a relatively short ride for intermediate cyclists, or a day of cross-crountry skiing - all depending, of course, on the weather.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
You're sitting in your car stuck in traffic, when a guy on a bike zips past going the wrong way. Or maybe he blows through a red light or jumps the curb and makes up time by barreling down the sidewalk. The Philadelphia Police Department wants you to know that these actions are illegal and soon, very soon, Commissioner Richard Neal will issue a directive telling officers to start writing tickets for scofflaws on Schwinns. And yesterday, a City Council committee did its share by approving a bill to raise the city fine from its Depression-era level of $3 to $10. City Councilwoman Happy Fernandez, who has pushed bills to increase street safety, said her bill merely corrects a technicality that the police wanted resolved - putting the city fine on a par with the state fine.
NEWS
July 5, 2009 | By Megan DeMarco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sea of red, white, and blue descended upon South Ocean City yesterday morning, when more than 1,000 cyclists of all ages displayed their patriotic-decorating skills in the annual holiday bike parade. Contestants found creative ways to spice up bicycles, scooters, and strollers with streamers, balloons, garlands, crepe paper, and leis, while participants donned stars-and-stripes hats, bandannas, shirts, and beads; Uncle Sam suits; and Statue of Liberty costumes. The festive group paraded a mile and a half along Central Avenue in just one of the many celebratory events held down the Shore on the Fourth of July.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Gregory Katz, Associated Press
LONDON - A British couple's round-the-world cycling odyssey ended in tragedy when both of them were killed in a road accident in Thailand. Peter Root and Mary Thompson, who had been chronicling their journey in a blog, died Wednesday when they were hit by a pickup truck in a province east of Bangkok, Thai police said Monday. The couple, both 34 and from Guernsey in the Channel Islands, left Britain in July 2011 and had cycled through Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia and China.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
While for many, the Fourth of July is a day to take it easy, Tony Borda and about 50 other intrepid trekkers plan to be pumping their way through West Chester. The cyclists are scheduled to arrive at West Chester University this afternooon on the next-to-last leg of their 456-mile trip, which started near Pittsburgh on Sunday. Tomorrow, they are to arrive at Penn's Landing. "This is not a race," said Borda, as he put the finishing touches on his 10-speed at his home in Marshallton before the trip.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
By Jake Blumgart On Sunday, thousands of cyclists found out what it's like to enjoy car-free city streets. They were taking part in Bike Philly, an annual ride hosted by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia that includes 10- and 20-mile loops closed off to traffic. There's no mystery why the coalition includes the "car-free" hook. A recent study shows that even in bike-friendly Portland, Ore., a strong majority are intrigued by urban bicycling but fear for their safety.
NEWS
October 6, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
A high school art teacher is organizing a bike ride in conjunction with the Oct. 12 AIDS Walk. Called GEAR (the Great End AIDS Ride), the 52-mile trek hopes to draw a couple hundred bicyclists to raise money for AIDS prevention and treatment. The ride begins at 7 a.m. Oct. 12 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art - a few hours earlier than the walk, which starts about 11 a.m. Teacher Christine Belton came up with the idea as part a project for a "self expression and leadership" class she's taking in her off hours from teaching art to teen-agers at Springfield High School, Delaware County.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryan Ohlson of Gladwyne readily admits that he feels ambivalent about his performance in Sunday's CoreStates Championship bicycle race - his first competition as a professional cyclist. He completed 120 of the 156 miles in the race, and that pleases him. But he didn't finish the race. And that upsets him. "My feelings are somewhat muddled about it," he says. "When I got off the bike, I was happy at first; the pain had stopped," says Ohlson, who is 28. "I felt good to have gone that far. Later, I felt bad for not finishing.
SPORTS
June 15, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Cycling produced the most positive drug tests of any Olympic sport in the latest global statistics compiled by the World Anti-Doping Agency. WADA-accredited laboratories reported 482 positive samples for cyclists in 2005. Baseball was second with 390 positives, while soccer was third with 343. Track and field - the most tested sport - was fourth with 342. Colleges A Penn State student who assaulted a police officer as students rushed the football field after a dramatic victory over Ohio State last fall was sentenced Tuesday to at least four months in prison, but he will be immediately eligible for work release.
SPORTS
June 8, 2009 | By Pat Leonard FOR THE INQUIRER
The most successful team in pro cycling lived up to its billing yesterday at the 25th annual Philadelphia International Cycling Championship, taking the first two spots in a race witnessed by an estimated crowd of 300,000. Andre Greipel, 26, of Germany crossed the finish line on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway with arms raised at 6 hours, 24 minutes, 4 seconds. Team Columbia-Highroad teammate Greg Henderson of New Zealand was less than a second behind in the 156-mile race. "It was a victory for our team," Greipel said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 4, 2016
As the nation reflects on the meaning of freedom and liberty this Fourth of July weekend, consider an unsung heroine of women's independence: the bicycle. Taking a broad definition of race and bicycle , Philadelphia women participated in one of the earliest competitions in North America featuring a two-wheeled, human-powered machine. In 1819, artist Charles Willson Peale witnessed his daughters Sybilla and Elizabeth informally racing "downhill like the very devil" on his velocipede, an iron juggernaut and the first two-wheeler in the city.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Terri Akman
Having recently moved into Center City from the suburbs, my husband and I are among the many empty nesters who left behind lawn mowing, leaf raking, and spending way too much time in a car. We are enthusiastically embracing this simpler life, enjoying a vibrant city where something interesting is always happening. Where else can you sit at a sidewalk coffee shop and see a Ben Franklin impersonator, a cat on a leash, and proud activists shouting out for their favorite cause, sometimes all at the same time?
BUSINESS
June 10, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia will soon use a new tool to separate cyclists from moving cars: other cars. For about half a mile on Ryan Avenue, between Lexington and Rowland Avenues in the Mayfair neighborhood, parallel parking space will be moved about 14 feet from the curb to make room for a bike lane in each direction. When the change is completed by August, city officials said, cyclists in the area will travel adjacent to the curb, separated from car traffic by parked cars and a four-foot buffer zone marked with flexible posts.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
IF LOSING a child is the worst kind of pain, then I can't imagine the kind of gut-wrenching anguish Channabel Latham-Morris will be in Wednesday as she returns to the city where her beloved son, Jamal Morris, died. The 27-year-old mechanical engineer with the bright smile and promising future was fatally injured April 18 in a hit-and-run accident while cycling in the wee hours near 45th and Market Streets. Morris, a 2011 graduate of Drexel University, was an avid cyclist, which is why Latham-Morris is scheduled to make the trek from Warwick, N.Y., to Philly.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
A 27-year-old man suffered minor injuries when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver while riding a bicycle Wednesday night in the Powelton section of West Philadelphia, police said. The man was riding north on 33rd Street at Powelton Avenue just after 8 p.m. when he was hit by a minivan making a turn at the intersection, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. The driver, described only as a woman, stopped to look at the accident, then sped away, Small said. The man was treated by medics at the scene for cut and bruises to his hands.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
A bicyclist died Tuesday afternoon after being struck by a SEPTA bus in Frankford, police said. About noon, the male cyclist cut in front of a Route J bus traveling on Orthodox Street near Aramingo Avenue, police said. The bus struck the cyclist, who was taken to Aria Health's Frankford hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 12:12 p.m., police said. The bus driver stopped at the scene. The bus had no passengers at the time, but was in service, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2016 | By Pam Leblanc, AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN
AUSTIN, Texas - These cyclists don't choke down PowerBars or Gatorade. They're not interested in going fast or finishing first. And Spandex shorts? Forget it. They prefer a slow-moving roll, fueled by bacon ravioli, glazed Brussels sprouts, and trendy cocktails. As for appropriate gear, a dress and high-heeled boots will do just fine. "I was a little bit scared, because I'm not the most coordinated person," said Nicole Khalife of New York, who, along with her friend Mary Kenney of Chicago, signed up last month for a foodie bike tour during a trip to Austin.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A memorial service for a bicyclist who died after he was struck by a hit-and-run vehicle in West Philadelphia a week ago will be next Saturday in his hometown of Warwick, N.Y., his family said. Jamal Morris, 27, an avid cyclist and a Drexel University graduate, was riding his bright red Chainboard bicycle near 45th and Market Streets about 3:45 a.m. April 16 when he was struck by a vehicle. Morris, who suffered massive head trauma, was taken to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where he died two days later.
NEWS
March 14, 2016
David Karen is a professor of sociology at Bryn Mawr College By law and in practice, drivers and bike riders are ostensibly committed to sharing the road as fellow vehicles. My recent experience suggests that we must abandon this strategy: Drivers need to treat bicyclists like they treat pedestrians. Having cut my driving teeth on getting into the Midtown Tunnel in New York City at rush hour, I have grown up to be a very aware - some might say aggressive, but let's agree on very engaged - driver for the last 45 years.
NEWS
February 21, 2016
A Bucks County woman who killed a cyclist while driving drunk last summer was sentenced Friday to 4 1/2 to 13 years in state prison. Wendy Kristen Hawkes, 34, of Ottsville pleaded guilty to charges including homicide by vehicle while driving under the influence, the Bucks County District Attorney's Office said Friday. Hawkes hit Daniel Wilson, 45, of Ottsville as he was riding his bicycle down Ervin Road in Tinicum Township on July 9. She was going 17 mph over the speed limit and had a blood alcohol content of 0.29 percent, said Assistant District Attorney Gregg Shore.
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