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NEWS
March 4, 2013 | Associated Press
GETTYSBURG - Demolition work has begun on the Cyclorama building at Gettysburg National Military Park that used to house the 377-foot painting depicting a pivotal moment in the Civil War battle. Workers began tearing down the building last week, and demolition is expected to be complete by the end of April. The U.S. National Park Service had planned since 1999 to tear down the building, but the architect's son and a preservation group opposed the effort, and a court battle ensued that lasted more than three times the length of the Civil War. A court-ordered study last year concluded demolition was the best course of action.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Gettysburg Cyclorama building is history. In a cloud of concrete dust, the 50-year-old battlefield landmark came tumbling down Saturday after a 14-year struggle over its fate. At once reviled by Civil War buffs and beloved by fans of modern architecture, the circular structure, designed by the world-famous architect Richard Neutra, was built to house the massive Cyclorama painting depicting the Battle of Gettysburg's most important moment. By design, it occupied a prime piece of real estate on the battlefield, marking the Union line on Cemetery Ridge where Northern troops repelled Confederate forces during the climactic clash known as Pickett's Charge on the battle's final day, July 3, 1863.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A 14-year battle over the fate of a modern structure at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park is over. The National Park Service said Thursday that it would begin demolishing the Cyclorama building as soon as February, clearing the site ahead of the 150th anniversary commemoration of the battle. The site will be restored to its 1863 appearance, complete with a period apple orchard and replicas of the wood fences that once crisscrossed the fields, park spokeswoman Katie Lawhon said.
NEWS
November 6, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The controversial cyclorama building at Gettysburg National Military Park has been granted a reprieve by federal authorities. The National Park Service agreed to delay demolition of the 1961 building until a federal judge rules on a lawsuit filed two years ago by preservationists who want to save it. In a letter to a federal judge, a Justice Department attorney representing the Park Service said this week that the agency would continue to...
NEWS
January 19, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Gen. John Gibbon first glimpsed the colossal, circular painting Battle of Gettysburg in Chicago in 1884, he declared to a fellow Civil War veteran that it was "a sight to see before you die. " Gibbon was awed by the painting's three-dimensional illusion, which allowed viewers to "look out upon the field of Gettysburg," where 21 years earlier he had held the center of the Union line during the climactic Pickett's Charge. Today, visitors stand slack-jawed at a second version of the cyclorama, an enormous 360-degree painting depicting the battle, at Gettysburg National Military Park.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The battle over the fate of the Cyclorama building, the modernist structure that sits at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park, has lasted more than three times as long as the Civil War. The controversy has pitted fans and practitioners of 20th century architecture against Civil War purists, and landed the National Park Service in federal court. Now the demise of the 50-year-old structure appears imminent. The National Park Service, which first announced plans to demolish the Cyclorama in 1999, has complied with a judge's order to complete a comprehensive review of the building and possible alternative, and has again arrived at the same conclusion: Tear it down.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
The exhibit runs fromJune 16 through 2015 at the Gettysburg Military Park Museum and Visitor Center, 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg. The fee is included in the standard museum/film/Cyclorama painting admission, which is $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for youths ages 6 through 12. A ticket for only the exhibit can be purchased for $8 for adults and $6 for youths.
NEWS
October 30, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The battle over the future of the old cyclorama building at Gettysburg National Military Park heads to federal court in Washington today. A group of modern architecture scholars sued the National Park Service in 2006 over plans to tear down the circular building, designed by renowned American architect Richard Neutra to house the historic cyclorama painting. Lawyers representing the Recent Past Preservation Network and other plaintiffs are seeking an injunction in U.S. District Court to stop the planned demolition.
NEWS
August 30, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There may soon be a price tag attached to your next visit to Gettysburg. In a sudden about-face, the foundation that operates the new Gettysburg Museum and Visitor Center has proposed a $7.50 admission fee. Facing a nearly $1.8 million revenue shortfall as the tourist season winds down, officials of the Gettysburg Foundation are asking the National Park Service to approve the fee. Said Robert Wilburn, the foundation's president: "We...
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NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - During the monumental battle fought here 150 years ago, Powers Hill played a key role as a signal station and artillery position guarding the main route to Washington. Over time the fields turned to forest and few visitors made the short trek up the boulder-filled hill at the southeastern corner of Gettysburg National Military Park for the view. Because there wasn't one. Before last year you could not see the battlefield for the trees. Today, after trees have been clear-cut, a nonhistoric house demolished, and a small parcel of land purchased, a visitor can stand beside the boulders, look out across the Baltimore Pike clear over to Culp's Hill and understand exactly what was at stake.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
The exhibit runs fromJune 16 through 2015 at the Gettysburg Military Park Museum and Visitor Center, 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg. The fee is included in the standard museum/film/Cyclorama painting admission, which is $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for youths ages 6 through 12. A ticket for only the exhibit can be purchased for $8 for adults and $6 for youths.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Gettysburg Cyclorama building is history. In a cloud of concrete dust, the 50-year-old battlefield landmark came tumbling down Saturday after a 14-year struggle over its fate. At once reviled by Civil War buffs and beloved by fans of modern architecture, the circular structure, designed by the world-famous architect Richard Neutra, was built to house the massive Cyclorama painting depicting the Battle of Gettysburg's most important moment. By design, it occupied a prime piece of real estate on the battlefield, marking the Union line on Cemetery Ridge where Northern troops repelled Confederate forces during the climactic clash known as Pickett's Charge on the battle's final day, July 3, 1863.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | Associated Press
GETTYSBURG - Demolition work has begun on the Cyclorama building at Gettysburg National Military Park that used to house the 377-foot painting depicting a pivotal moment in the Civil War battle. Workers began tearing down the building last week, and demolition is expected to be complete by the end of April. The U.S. National Park Service had planned since 1999 to tear down the building, but the architect's son and a preservation group opposed the effort, and a court battle ensued that lasted more than three times the length of the Civil War. A court-ordered study last year concluded demolition was the best course of action.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A 14-year battle over the fate of a modern structure at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park is over. The National Park Service said Thursday that it would begin demolishing the Cyclorama building as soon as February, clearing the site ahead of the 150th anniversary commemoration of the battle. The site will be restored to its 1863 appearance, complete with a period apple orchard and replicas of the wood fences that once crisscrossed the fields, park spokeswoman Katie Lawhon said.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The battle over the fate of the Cyclorama building, the modernist structure that sits at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park, has lasted more than three times as long as the Civil War. The controversy has pitted fans and practitioners of 20th century architecture against Civil War purists, and landed the National Park Service in federal court. Now the demise of the 50-year-old structure appears imminent. The National Park Service, which first announced plans to demolish the Cyclorama in 1999, has complied with a judge's order to complete a comprehensive review of the building and possible alternative, and has again arrived at the same conclusion: Tear it down.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The battle over the fate of the Cyclorama building, the modernist structure that sits at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park, has lasted more than three times as long as the Civil War. The controversy has pitted fans and practitioners of 20th century architecture against Civil War purists, and landed the National Park Service in federal court. Now the demise of the 50-year-old structure appears imminent. The National Park Service, which first announced plans to demolish the Cyclorama in 1999, has complied with a judge's order to complete a comprehensive review of the building and possible alternative, and has again arrived at the same conclusion: Tear it down.
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