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Cylinder

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NEWS
January 17, 2001 | By Alicia A. Caldwell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fourteen workers suffered respiratory injuries yesterday when a cylinder of highly flammable and toxic hydrogen selenide gas ruptured at the Solkatronic Chemicals plant, spewing about 160 pounds of the colorless gas into the air. All 14 workers were hospitalized overnight for observation, company officials said. They were among 20 workers in the plant manufacturing area when the cylinder ruptured. The victims were employees and on-site contractors at Solkatronic Chemicals, which is in an industrial park on Philadelphia Avenue.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, one of the best-known dealers at Renningers, that mecca of collectibles in Adamstown, was Dave Houser - for his inventory if not for his name. Houser was a nationally ranked collector of cylinder phonographs, although he had other interests. He had liquidated most of his phonograph collection before his death two months ago, but many of his other collections remained intact, and they will be sold in the coming week at a two-day auction at Blum's auction company in Pottsville.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
An explosion and fire at a chemical testing plant early yesterday killed three men and seriously injured a fourth, and officials said they were focusing their investigation on a cylinder of possibly unstable gas. The blast occurred at 1:51 a.m. at the Gollob Analytical Services plant, sending a plume of dense smoke above a light industrial area of this Union County community, said police Chief Ralph M. Del Duca. Three badly burned workers were confirmed dead at the scene, according to Officer David Bogert.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took a Bucks County hazardous-materials team more than eight hours to contain a cylinder found to be leaking hydrochloric acid fumes at the back of a Stovers Mills Road home and neutralize its contents. Authorities were called to the property shortly after 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday by the homeowner, who spotted fumes rising about 100 feet at the back of the home. Mark Showmaker, Bucks County's hazardous-materials coordinator, said that upon arrival, the Hazardous Incident Response Team (HIRT)
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There they were yesterday, more than a dozen old tractors - one behind the other like elephants at a circus parade - plowing a farmer's field in southern Chester County. Just for a day of play. "We have a lot of fun, just playing with [the tractors]," said Dave Regester, 55, of West Grove, before his tractor set out after the pack. "Boys and their toys. " What do you do when you're no longer a full-time farmer and you still have an old John Deere two-cylinder out in the barn?
NEWS
August 30, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
To some, the inert green and yellow torpedo shell found in Port Richmond Friday and later destroyed by police was a piece of metal that would have made a handsome cash reward for a lucky son-of-a-gun who could lug the object to the nearest junkyard. But to Ron Reeves it conjured up fond memories of his time at the Naval Shipyard. "Too bad, a piece of history was destroyed by those who are ignorant without trying to find out what it was," he said. Reeves, of Oaklyn, N.J., contacted the Daily News to identify the hollow, 19.4-foot-long, half-ton cylinder that police destroyed last week as a U.S. Navy Mark-14 practice round, a standard World War II submarine-launched torpedo.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
As some residents of Palmyra tell it, the Burlington County community has at least three claims to fame - the Tacomy-Palmyra Bridge, the Palmyra String Band and Armotek Industries Inc. Armotek? You may not recognize the name, but this supplier of services to the graphic-arts industry has touched your life. Take the recent series of four-color commemorative stamps that the postal service issued on Duke Ellington, Jerome Keren, the Arctic Explorer and the China Clipper, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
I have a set of the Yellow Book magazine, published in England quarterly, 1894 to 1897. Could you please tell me the value of the set of 13 books? If in very good condition, in their original yellow cloth bindings, your 13 volume set of the Yellow Book is worth $750 to $1,000 retail. If in just good condition, it's worth $400 to $750, according to Philadelphia rare book dealer David Holmes. The Yellow Book was an important literary periodical in England in the 1890s. Published by Elkin Mathews and John Lane and edited by Henry Harland, an American living in London, it popularized many writers.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Holy Hogwarts! Scientists are one step closer to creating a real version of Harry Potter's Cloak of Invisibility. A team of physicists announced Monday they had successfully hidden a seven-inch cylinder from a microwave imaging device with a "three-dimensional stand-alone mantle cloak. " The cloak is constructed out of a "metasurface," an ultrafine mesh of copper-tape filaments, each thinner than a human hair, according to the team's paper published in the New Journal of Physics . The fishnet design of the metasurface scattered radiowaves in a pattern that was opposite to those reflected from the cylinder, said the team which is based at the University of Texas at Austin.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: I recently bought a 1969 Chevy Camaro. The car runs fine, but the exhausts leave black soot rings on the garage floor when I start it up. The engine was rebuilt just 5,000 miles ago, and doesn't burn a drop of oil. Answer: Just because the engine was rebuilt doesn't mean engine accessories such as the carburetor were, too. I think the carb is running rich, which means there is too much gas in the fuel/air mixture entering the engine....
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NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Holy Hogwarts! Scientists are one step closer to creating a real version of Harry Potter's Cloak of Invisibility. A team of physicists announced Monday they had successfully hidden a seven-inch cylinder from a microwave imaging device with a "three-dimensional stand-alone mantle cloak. " The cloak is constructed out of a "metasurface," an ultrafine mesh of copper-tape filaments, each thinner than a human hair, according to the team's paper published in the New Journal of Physics . The fishnet design of the metasurface scattered radiowaves in a pattern that was opposite to those reflected from the cylinder, said the team which is based at the University of Texas at Austin.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Staff Writer
DETROIT'S OFFENSE last year was the equivalent of a Cadillac. This year, it's a Pinto. The numbers for the star quarterback and the superstar wide receiver are similar to what they did at this point in 2011, except for touchdowns. In real football, but more so in fantasy, that's generally the offense's bottom line. Matt Stafford has completed more passes at a higher percentage through four games, but has only three touchdown passes. Calvin "Megatron" Johnson, who was on the Madden '13 cover, by the way (jinx alert)
SPORTS
May 2, 2012 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE FLYERS did not get a sniff of the NHL's postseason awards this season, and the Jack Adams Award for coach of the year was the final sniffle. The three finalists, all worthy, are the Rangers' John Tortorella, the Senators' Paul MacLean and the guy who should win, the Blues' Ken Hitchcock. And Peter Laviolette? The Flyers' coach will have to settle for having the most stylistically entertaining and identifiable team left in the Stanley Cup tournament. Lots of teams in the NHL say they want to forecheck.
SPORTS
June 15, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
All-Star Games often are messy affairs, given the unfamiliarity of the players, frequent substitutions, and casual atmosphere. But the Tri-Cape team was all business Tuesday morning. Combining solid pitching with timely hitting and strong defense, Tri-Cape rolled to a 6-2 victory over Berks County in the first round of the 26th annual Carpenter Cup baseball tournament at Richie Ashburn Field in FDR Park. "This is a really good group," said Tri-Cape manager Keith Gorman, the coach at Holy Spirit.
NEWS
August 30, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
To some, the inert green and yellow torpedo shell found in Port Richmond Friday and later destroyed by police was a piece of metal that would have made a handsome cash reward for a lucky son-of-a-gun who could lug the object to the nearest junkyard. But to Ron Reeves it conjured up fond memories of his time at the Naval Shipyard. "Too bad, a piece of history was destroyed by those who are ignorant without trying to find out what it was," he said. Reeves, of Oaklyn, N.J., contacted the Daily News to identify the hollow, 19.4-foot-long, half-ton cylinder that police destroyed last week as a U.S. Navy Mark-14 practice round, a standard World War II submarine-launched torpedo.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Think about it," Alan Mulally implored: Just 14 months ago, the top executive at Ford Motor Co. was seated alongside his compadres at soon-to-be-bankrupt General Motors and Chrysler, at a congressional panel considering pleas for emergency taxpayer loans. "Isn't that incredible?" Mulally said, wide-eyed and proud as he wound back the clock Friday morning during an unusual stop in Philadelphia. With global rival Toyota hobbled by a recall crisis and Ford hot off its first reported full-year profit since 2005, the lone U.S. automaker that avoided bankruptcy and bailout aid is on a recession roll that would have seemed unimaginable a year ago. And Mulally, an aeronautical engineer and longtime Boeing Co. executive who took over at Ford less than four years ago with a plan to make the beleaguered automaker more like Toyota, is starting to look like the smartest guy in Motor City.
NEWS
April 9, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Between my childhood, my husband's and my children's, we may have collectively seen the 1968 film version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (based on Ian Fleming's book), whose national tour is currently parked at the Academy of Music, at least 100 times. And it's a telling detail that none of us can really articulate what went on in that film - something about a magic car, whistling lollipops, and, I don't know, maybe the Kaiser? - with its dark-cornered absurdism and plain old weirdness courtesy of Roald Dahl and Ken Hughes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new TV season doesn't begin for three weeks. But a number of shows are diving in early, intent on getting a few laps in before the big boys cannonball into the pool. Today we look at a pair of new cable series that are jumping the networks. The better bet is Sons of Anarchy on FX (Wednesdays at 10 p.m.), a shockingly good series about a motorcycle gang in the apocryphal California valley town of Charming. This is the most unusual and engaging family drama since The Sopranos, to which Sons of Anarchy bears certain similarities.
NEWS
May 8, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
TIME WAS, I could spend an entire Saturday morning eating Froot Loops. I'd fill a large container with cereal and milk, and deplete and refill the bowl until the milk had turned thick and pink. Then I'd drink the syrupy elixir. Ahhh. Just thinking about it makes me  . . . vomit. You get older, the sweet tooth abates. Or the dentist grinds it down and glues a cap over it. And your tastes change. The idea of plain Shredded Wheat does not seem so appalling.
SPORTS
February 3, 2008 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Pat Calathes has emerged as the go-to guy for St. Joseph's, for the Hawks to be successful they need production from their "six starters," as coach Phil Martelli calls them. So when a struggling Darrin Govens and an injured Tasheed Carr can play near their potential, St. Joe's is without a weak link. While the improving Hawks have yet to peak, yesterday provided a glimpse of what could be. With Govens and Carr each contributing 11 points, St. Joe's earned a workmanlike 70-55 win over Fordham at Alumni Memorial Fieldhouse, with Villanova next on the docket tomorrow.
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