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NEWS
February 7, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d delivered U.S. economic encouragement to the struggling new government of Czechoslovakia yesterday as thousands of Czechoslovaks protested the presence of Soviet troops. President Vaclav Havel told Baker of his determination to get Soviet troops out of his country quickly and to reduce the size of the Czechoslovak armed forces. Baker, the first U.S. secretary of state to visit the Eastern European country since 1973, offered trade incentives, financial assistance and technical expertise.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
With a career spanning four decades, from 1967's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead to Rock 'n' Roll, which opened on Broadway last season and has its local premiere at the Wilma Theater on Wednesday, Tom Stoppard is considered by many to be the greatest living English-language playwright. Though he believes that there is no need for more Stoppard-on-Stoppard, and that his plays should just be "out there," he agreed to a phone interview from London because "I love the Wilma.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Archbishop Anthony J. Bevilacqua will leave Saturday for a trip to Czechoslovakia, where relations between the Catholic Church and the communist regime are the worst of any country in Eastern Europe. The archbishop said in an interview yesterday that Cardinal Frantisek Tomasek, the archbishop of Prague, invited him last year to make the trip. The journey is "solely a pastoral visit" to take part in various religious ceremonies, not a diplomatic mission for the Vatican, Archbishop Bevilacqua said.
SPORTS
February 13, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Petr Rosol scored with 3 minutes, 18 seconds to play last night to lift Czechoslovakia to a historic 4-3 upset of the former Soviet hockey machine in the first contest between two serious medal contenders in the 12-nation Olympic tournament. Czechoslovakia, which had not beaten the Russian rivals in the Olympics since 1968, raised its record to 3-0 with the win over the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) squad, skating in Meribel under the Unified Team designation. "Because of the Olympic system it's only one game.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Some cardinals, and some pilgrims, came the hard way. Hundreds of Philadelphia area residents have celebrated, in health and prosperity, the elevation of Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua this past week. Meanwhile, a half-dozen Slovak- Americans from New Jersey have joined with their poor, brown-bag Slovak kin for a much more emotional journey. They are the cousins of Cardinal Jan Chryzostom Korec of Nitro, Czechoslovakia - one of several new princes of the Catholic Church in Bevilacqua's Class of '91 whose stories read like lives of the saints.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Karel Vas, 96, a prosecutor who came to symbolize unlawful trials during the post-1948 communist takeover of Czechoslovakia, has died. Czech public television reported that Mr. Vas died Saturday in a home for retirees in Prague where he had lived. Details were not available. During World War II, he moved to the Soviet Union where he began to collaborate with dictator Josef Stalin's much-feared secret police. Historians say Mr. Vas one of the state prosecutors who played a key role in show trials that used fabricated evidence to hand out death sentences to opponents of the communist regime in Czechoslovakia.
SPORTS
February 22, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Ray LeBlanc and his teammates' attempt to win the bronze medal in ice hockey will be televised live by CBS (Channel 10) at 3 p.m. today. The United States, which fell, 5-2, to the Unified Team yesterday, will meet Czechoslovakia, a 4-2 loser to Canada. The U.S. team (5-1-1) is looking for its first medal since winning the gold in 1980. It finished seventh in 1984 and 1988. Czechoslovakia (5-2), the only team to beat the Unified Team in this tournament, won a silver medal in 1984, but slumped to sixth in 1988.
SPORTS
February 19, 1988 | By Al Morganti, Inquirer Staff Writer
American hockey fans should root for the Soviet Union to defeat West Germany tonight at the Olympic Saddledome. A victory by West Germany would severely damage the United States' chances of getting into the medal round. But if the Soviets win and the U.S. team defeats Norway, the third and last medal-round berth from Pool B could be determined by Sunday's meeting between the United States and West Germany. There are many possibilities, but in the two most likely scenarios, the United States would have to defeat West Germany by two or more goals Sunday, or simply win the game.
SPORTS
February 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Unbeaten West Germany took a major step toward the Olympic hockey medal round with a come-from-behind, 3-1 victory over winless but surprisingly tough Austria yesterday in Calgary. Helmut Steiger broke a 1-1 tie with his third goal of the Olympics 38 seconds into the second period, while West Germany had a two-man advantage. The sixth-seeded West Germans (3-0) still must play the second-seeded Soviet Union and the seventh-seeded United States in their remaining two games before the six-team medal round.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ilona Tkach Keller fled her native Czechoslovakia in the 1940s and became a successful businesswoman here, but in 1980 she saw fire destroy her first Northeast Philadelphia restaurant. After recovering from that loss, she opened Ilona Keller's Dugan's Restaurant & Banquets and, over the decades, watched it become a Roosevelt Boulevard landmark. "I like to take chances," she told Inquirer columnist Tom Fox in 1981. "If I didn't take chances, I would still be living under Russian tyranny.
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TRAVEL
August 24, 2014 | By Walt Tremer, For The Inquirer
The echoes of deep history were lying in the ground in front of me. As an archaeologist digging at a 10,000-year-old settlement on the outskirts of Bylany, Czechoslovakia, I held evidence of a long-gone culture gently and lovingly in my hands. A clay pot held by some young girl, a bronze pin worn by an ancient babushka, a rusted sickle blade swung by a calloused hand eons ago, they all spoke clearly to me. I had the wonderfully fortunate and fascinating opportunity to be a time traveler and to walk with the ancients.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Karel Vas, 96, a prosecutor who came to symbolize unlawful trials during the post-1948 communist takeover of Czechoslovakia, has died. Czech public television reported that Mr. Vas died Saturday in a home for retirees in Prague where he had lived. Details were not available. During World War II, he moved to the Soviet Union where he began to collaborate with dictator Josef Stalin's much-feared secret police. Historians say Mr. Vas one of the state prosecutors who played a key role in show trials that used fabricated evidence to hand out death sentences to opponents of the communist regime in Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ilona Tkach Keller fled her native Czechoslovakia in the 1940s and became a successful businesswoman here, but in 1980 she saw fire destroy her first Northeast Philadelphia restaurant. After recovering from that loss, she opened Ilona Keller's Dugan's Restaurant & Banquets and, over the decades, watched it become a Roosevelt Boulevard landmark. "I like to take chances," she told Inquirer columnist Tom Fox in 1981. "If I didn't take chances, I would still be living under Russian tyranny.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
It's fitting that the death of the great Czech playwright/philosopher of democracy, Vaclav Havel, overlapped the demise of North Korea's despotic Kim Jong Il. And it's equally fitting that his death came as Egypt's military rulers are attacking opposition activists in the aftermath of the Arab Spring. We all remember Havel as the leading East European dissident of the 1980s who became the first president of Czechoslovakia after communism's fall in 1989. But fewer recall how long and at what cost Havel struggled for his beliefs, during decades when no one thought the Soviet empire would crumble.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The life of Václav Havel, who died Sunday at age 75, shows poetry can shape the destiny of nations and change the course of history. Dazzled by dollar signs, we in the United States tend not to take the art of language seriously. But Havel (who was awarded the 1994 Liberty Medal) knew the potency of words to mold the future. For more than five decades - in the tradition of Mohandas Gandhi and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., John Lennon and Pope John Paul II - Havel used words to do just that.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
With a career spanning four decades, from 1967's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead to Rock 'n' Roll, which opened on Broadway last season and has its local premiere at the Wilma Theater on Wednesday, Tom Stoppard is considered by many to be the greatest living English-language playwright. Though he believes that there is no need for more Stoppard-on-Stoppard, and that his plays should just be "out there," he agreed to a phone interview from London because "I love the Wilma.
NEWS
May 11, 2008 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
In 1935, Vera Herman Goodkin, then 5, overheard a conversation between her mother and maternal grandmother in her home in Czechoslovakia. Her grandmother cautioned that European Jews were in danger and that the family should consider leaving the Carpathian Mountains, a place they had inhabited for five generations. "My mother said it would never happen here [in Czechoslovakia]. She never forgave herself for those words," recalled Goodkin, author of the memoir In Sunshine and in Shadow: We Remember Them, published in 2006.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arnost Kleinzeller, 82, professor emeritus of physiology at the University of Pennsylvania, died Saturday at his home in University City after a long illness. Professor Kleinzeller was an internationally known physiologist and biochemist whose groundbreaking scientific work demonstrated how kidney cells regulate the contents of water and salt and how they move sugars through tissue membranes, family members said. Professor Kleinzeller was a professor of physiology at Penn between 1967 and 1985, when he retired.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Tomas Otevrel, a native of Czechoslovakia, was invited to continue his cancer research in the United States in 1988, he jumped at the opportunity, or tried to. But it took more than six months for him to get the papers he needed to leave. "I needed permission from the Communist Party," he explained. "That was the most difficult step. It took a very long time. I don't know why it was so slow, but every kind of administration was very difficult. " Three weeks after he left, the Communists were overthrown during the Velvet Revolution.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Edward S.J. Tomezsko took a vacation from his job as head of the Pennsylvania State University Delaware County campus in Media and went in search of his roots. He traveled to his parents' birthplace in Slovakia, a place undergoing radical but peaceful change after renouncing communism and splitting from the Czech Republic. This week, Penn State announced a fortunate outgrowth of Tomezsko's travels: the Delaware County campus' first international faculty partnership.
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