CollectionsDachau
IN THE NEWS

Dachau

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 23, 1996 | by Rabbi Toby H. Manewith, Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service
I met a fascinating man this summer. I didn't really meet him. I am not sure he even looked my way - but he told a story that has stayed with me. The gray-haired, stocky, old Jew had been a soldier in the Polish army during World War II. He and his comrades were captured by German soldiers and held as prisoners of war in Dachau. It might have been advantageous to his army buddies to have turned him in - information on Jews was rewarded with extra food or more lenient treatment - they did not. They helped him hide his Judaism, enabling him to survive Dachau.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In this holiday season, Milt Pincus was asked to give a noontime talk to a local leisure club about something that was far from festive. The 79-year-old Jewish World War II veteran from Levittown accepted the request, knowing that many in the club at Congregation Beth El on Stony Hill Road would have their own tales, more dramatic, more horrifying than his. So Pincus sped through a 15-page script about liberating Dachau, looking up rarely,...
NEWS
November 17, 1997 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Roman Laniecki, a survivor of the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau and an active force in Philadelphia's Polish-American community, died Thursday. He was 77 and a resident of Center City. "Until poor health slowed him down, my husband was active with the Polish American Congress, the Polish War Veterans Association and the Polish Heritage Society," recalled his wife of 46 years, Sabina. A soft-spoken man of polished manners and a charm best described as Old World, Laniecki was referred to by friends as an honest-to-goodness Kujawiak.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ernie Gross, 83, of Northeast Philadelphia, was a 16-year-old Orthodox Jew from Romania when on April 29, 1945, he found himself waiting to be put to death at the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. Don Greenbaum, 87, of Bala Cynwyd, was a 20-year-old corporal from Philadelphia who, with hundreds of fellow U.S. soldiers, arrived to liberate Dachau that very day, literally in the nick of time to save Gross' life. For almost 67 years, neither knew the other existed. Now, they have found each other, and are becoming friends - two white-haired men with a shared determination that the world must never forget the six million Jews, along with million of others considered undesirable, who were murdered by the Nazis in World War II. "I always wanted to meet somebody who liberated me, because I wasn't clear at the time," said Gross, who spoke Romanian and Yiddish as a child.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bill Wallace saw enough battlefield carnage to last a lifetime during the four months his infantry division fought its way into Germany in late 1944 and 1945. But no amount of combat, Wallace said, could have prepared him for the horror he would witness on the morning of April 29, 1945. That day, his company took part in the liberation of Dachau, the German concentration camp where 32,000 inmates were incarcerated and thousands more died. "We knew where we were going that day, but we had no idea of what we were going to see," Wallace said.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willy Herbst, 93, of Philadelphia, a Holocaust survivor who later helped free prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp, died Tuesday, March 10, of complications from a hip fracture at the Hearth at Drexel in Bala Cynwyd. Mr. Herbst was born in Zaberfeld, Germany, and trained as a baker in Heidelberg. In 1939, at 18, he was among the Jewish men sent to the Paderborn concentration camp by the Nazis to perform forced labor. According to an oral history Mr. Herbst gave the Jewish Virtual Library, he collapsed while being marched to a quarry in late 1939.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore B. Cohen, 92, of Narberth, a psychoanalyst who specialized in treating children and adolescents for more than 60 years, died Wednesday, April 22, of dementia at his home. Dr. Cohen was well known for his active study and practice, both focused on what he called "the vulnerable child. " He was deeply committed to understanding children, how they learned, and how their mental health issues could be overcome. In 1976, he organized the first international meeting centered on children and adolescents.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William F. Jennings Sr., 82, a retired investment officer who participated in the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp at the end of World War II, died Sunday at his Sellersville home after an illness. He resided in Warminster for 25 years before moving to Sellersville two years ago. Before retiring in 1992, Mr. Jennings spent more than 25 years as vice president for mutual funds for the former Delfi Inc./Sigma Group in Wilmington. Previously, he was an investment broker with the former Drass & Co. in Sunbury, Pa., where he lived for six years, and for the former Eastman Dillon Co. in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Never was gas in Theresienstadt. " Susanne Reinisch repeated that phrase like a mantra as she led us through her memories - and the streets - of the Czech fortress town that the Nazis called Theresienstadt. There were no gas chambers here, Reinisch was saying. But death arrived in other unnatural ways. "When we heard the word transport," said Reinisch, "we trembled. " Terezin, which historians have variously called a ghetto and a concentration camp, was a place of shifting meanings.
NEWS
January 27, 1995 | BY JACK McKINNEY
In observing the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, it should be noted that Jan. 27, 1945, did not mark the end of the ordeal for those prisoners who had not yet been claimed by the gas chambers and ovens of Hitler's most technologically advanced murder complex. Almost two weeks before Soviet troops arrived at the iron gates, the Nazis rounded up the inmates still well enough to travel and led them on a forced trek westward. Of the estimated 300,000 who set out on that torturous journey from camp to camp, less than 500 were still alive when it ended three months later at the Dachau death camp in Germany itself.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore B. Cohen, 92, of Narberth, a psychoanalyst who specialized in treating children and adolescents for more than 60 years, died Wednesday, April 22, of dementia at his home. Dr. Cohen was well known for his active study and practice, both focused on what he called "the vulnerable child. " He was deeply committed to understanding children, how they learned, and how their mental health issues could be overcome. In 1976, he organized the first international meeting centered on children and adolescents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Jan L. Apple, For The Inquirer
Bernie Lens, 94, often carries a handful of photographs in his shirt pocket. The images are from Dachau concentration camp, some from the very day in the spring of 1945 when, as a young American soldier, he was ordered to the site 12 miles outside Munich. Two prisoners, he says, died in his arms as he was carrying them to freedom. Though seven decades have passed, the memory of what he encountered continues to haunt him. "There's not a day that goes by that I don't relive what happened," said the Yardley resident, reaching to share the photos of horror - piles of bodies, almost unrecognizably human.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willy Herbst, 93, of Philadelphia, a Holocaust survivor who later helped free prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp, died Tuesday, March 10, of complications from a hip fracture at the Hearth at Drexel in Bala Cynwyd. Mr. Herbst was born in Zaberfeld, Germany, and trained as a baker in Heidelberg. In 1939, at 18, he was among the Jewish men sent to the Paderborn concentration camp by the Nazis to perform forced labor. According to an oral history Mr. Herbst gave the Jewish Virtual Library, he collapsed while being marched to a quarry in late 1939.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
To hear Mark Nadler tell it in his cabaret act I'm a Stranger Here Myself , the only point of the Weimar Republic was to provide gay men with a decadent Eden. But unlike the sexy, funny, edgy Kander and Ebb musical Cabaret , also about the Weimar Republic, this show at the Prince Music Theater is cloying. Also boring. Also melodramatic. Also strident. Nadler, a New York cabaret entertainer, tells us he is both gay and Jewish, and returns again and again to the theme of Nazi persecution of both Jews and homosexuals - with photos projected on the upstage wall (as though anyone in the audience might not have seen them before or heard of Dachau)
NEWS
October 22, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 105 years, William Aloysius Mohr has experienced many important days. The day his father died in a printing plant accident. The day his mother, destitute, sent him and his twin brother to an orphanage. The days he spent in the Army during World War II. The day he married his wife, Josephine, and the days his four children were born. The day he retired, at 93. On Sunday, Bill Mohr's family, friends, and neighbors gathered to celebrate a few more important milestones - his 105th birthday, a renewal of vows after 70 years of marriage, and the award of an honorary degree from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The government shutdown ruined plans of Lancaster high school students to visit the Holocaust Museum in Washington, but a Philadelphia group jumped in Wednesday to offer a vivid firsthand lesson of the 20th century's great horror. "They called us and their first question was, 'Are you open?' " said Phil Holtje, program director of the Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center in Northeast Philadelphia. The center was open. But the theater and bigger rooms at the Klein Jewish Community Center, where the museum is housed, were already booked.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Samuel White, 92, formerly of Hatboro, a retired tool-and-die maker and a World War II combat engineer, died Sunday, June 3, of pneumonia at Quarryville Presbyterian Retirement Community in Lancaster County. Mr. White graduated from Horsham High School in 1938 and then had several jobs, including working in a cement-block factory. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and was assigned to the 36th Combat Engineer Regiment. He participated in amphibious assaults on Algiers, Sicily, Anzio, and southern France, removing concrete beach obstacles, detonating booby traps, and laying bridges under fire.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ernie Gross, 83, of Northeast Philadelphia, was a 16-year-old Orthodox Jew from Romania when on April 29, 1945, he found himself waiting to be put to death at the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. Don Greenbaum, 87, of Bala Cynwyd, was a 20-year-old corporal from Philadelphia who, with hundreds of fellow U.S. soldiers, arrived to liberate Dachau that very day, literally in the nick of time to save Gross' life. For almost 67 years, neither knew the other existed. Now, they have found each other, and are becoming friends - two white-haired men with a shared determination that the world must never forget the six million Jews, along with million of others considered undesirable, who were murdered by the Nazis in World War II. "I always wanted to meet somebody who liberated me, because I wasn't clear at the time," said Gross, who spoke Romanian and Yiddish as a child.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Jill Lawless and Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
How do you sum up the work of songwriter Robert B. Sherman? Try one word: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The tongue-twisting term, sung by the magical nanny Mary Poppins, is like much of Sherman's work - both complex and instantly memorable for child and adult alike. Mr. Sherman, who died in London on Monday at 86, was half of a sibling partnership that put songs into the mouths of nannies and Cockney chimney sweeps, jungle animals and Parisian felines.
NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William P. Purcell Jr., 87, of Lansdowne, a retired food broker and World War II prisoner of war, died of heart failure Friday, Nov. 19, at home. Mr. Purcell graduated from Upper Darby High School and entered Cornell University. After World War II started, he left Cornell and served in the Army in France as a jeep driver. In November 1944 he drove into an enemy attack while trying to pick up wounded soldiers. He yelled in German, "Don't shoot!" and pointed to the red cross on the jeep, and the Germans backed off, his son Bill said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|