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Dada

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NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Because his images are so personal and so maddeningly enigmatic, Max Ernst (1891-1976) is one of the most challenging artists of this century. He also occupies a central position in two major modernist movements, dada and surrealism. He may be difficult to comprehend, but he's too important to be ignored. "Max Ernst: Dada and the Dawn of Surrealism," at the Museum of Modern Art through May 2, earnestly attempts to document the origins of Ernst's unconventional style of image-making, which had a lasting effect on 20th- century art. It looks at the early and lesser-known Ernst, before he became a prominent surrealist in Paris in the mid-1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | By Penny Jeannechild, Special to The Inquirer
What do you think the following have in common: An ode to the buttocks and trash as musical instrument. Elephant execution by hanging and buoyant BINGO. Genocide and laughter. Give up? They're all art. Silly art. Serious art. To be precise, Dada. "Anything can be Dada. If you say it is, it is," says Billy Ehret, the Painted Bride Art Center's gallery director and performance curator. "Dada Again" is the Bride's fourth annual celebration of Dada and surrealism. A European art movement rooted in the political and the absurd, Dada moved to New York City with Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp during World War I. Tonight's send-up starts at 8, and the 12 planned pieces run the gamut.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Though Daniel Olushola Dada has lived in the United States for 26 years, his heart remains with the Yoruba people in the western region of his native Nigeria. For 15 years, Dada, 52, who lives in Bethel Township and practices medicine in Chester, has sought to build a medical clinic in Ibadan, a city of about 1.2 million near the Nigerian coastline, not far from the Yoruba village where he grew up. The pediatrician has enlisted the help of several other Nigerian-born doctors living in the United States.
SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to fatherhood, Rolen is reborn Scott Rolen is in a good place right now. The former Phillies third baseman is the father of two - daughter Raine and son Finn - and he is headed to his first All-Star Game since 2006 because of the way he's playing for the first-place Cincinnati Reds. He said before Thursday night's game against the Phillies that the children and good health are responsible for his baseball resurrection this season. "I have a 2-year-old and so I'm a dad number one," Rolen said.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
Suppose that one day the circus came to town and it didn't have elephants that were 14 feet tall, a blond guy named Hans who stuck his head into the mouth of a tiger, or a single woman parading around in a sequined gown that cost a fortune and weighed a 20 pounds. And it didn't have a high-hatted ringmaster with gleaming black boots or a calliope that played the da-da dada dada da-da dada that circus calliopes always play. It didn't even have a Big Top. In fact, this circus had no top at all, and rather than three rings, it only had one. This circus was so small that when the acrobat did a flip-flop, you were sitting close enough to feel the draft.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
Suppose that one day the circus came to town and it didn't have elephants that were 14 feet tall, a blond guy named Hans who stuck his head into the mouth of a tiger, or a single woman parading around in a sequined gown that cost a fortune and weighed a 20 pounds. And it didn't have a high-hatted ringmaster with gleaming black boots or a calliope that played the da-da dada dada da-da dada that circus calliopes always play. It didn't even have a Big Top. In fact, this circus had no top at all, and rather than three rings, it only had one. This circus was so small that when the acrobat did a flip-flop, you were sitting close enough to feel the draft.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | By Maciej Pawlicki, Inquirer Staff Writer
The artist Man Ray once declared that his goal was "to accuse, bewilder, annoy or to inspire reflection. " He was mistaken by putting in or. There's nothing wrong with annoying and inspiring reflection, or provoking artistic shock and provoking brain activity. He succeeded at both. Man Ray's current exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art shows an artist who rebelled against art as a conventional form of expression. For him, art had very little to do with fitting into established patterns and very much to do with breaking them, turning them upside down, mocking them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Just when you thought that pop art was safely behind us, a new generation of hip '90s artists comes along and reinvents it. Not that pop art needed reinventing - once around that block was more than enough. No matter. In contemporary art, the wheel is continually being reborn. Old ideas are recycled with the regularity and inevitability of political slogans. A bit of spin on the delivery creates the illusion of a breakthrough. It also brings us to "Pop Politics," a three-artist exhibition at the Tyler and Temple galleries.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It has been observed that the arrival of "Perpetual Motif: The Art of Man Ray" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art represents a double measure of poetic justice. The retrospective, which originated at the National Museum of American Art in Washington in December, is concluding in Man Ray's nominal home town and in a museum that holds an exceptional collection of work by his close friend and aesthetic soulmate, Marcel Duchamp. The Duchamp connection is particularly fitting, for no other American artist embraced the spirit of the satiric dada movement as wholeheartedly as Man Ray. If Duchamp was the father of dada, Man Ray was its first cousin.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Imitation is the sincerest form of marketing in pop music. Meaning: If one or two groups do well in a genre - as post-modern rebels R.E.M. and 10,000 Maniacs have - then many more strivers in the same vein will be quickly signed by record labels and shoved before the willing public. And so, among this fall's album releases we find a veritable deluge of alternative rock groups fronted by elliptical, high-reaching poets. Here are some of them: The Wallflowers (Virgin). Thirty years ago, Bob Dylan radicalized pop by setting cynical, poetically ambitious and ambiguous lyrics in a folk (and later folk-rock)
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SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to fatherhood, Rolen is reborn Scott Rolen is in a good place right now. The former Phillies third baseman is the father of two - daughter Raine and son Finn - and he is headed to his first All-Star Game since 2006 because of the way he's playing for the first-place Cincinnati Reds. He said before Thursday night's game against the Phillies that the children and good health are responsible for his baseball resurrection this season. "I have a 2-year-old and so I'm a dad number one," Rolen said.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
Stitch. You don't need a huge tent and a zillion-dollar production for a wow! moment. Proof is at the Philadelphia School of Circus Arts in Germantown, where two impossibly graceful athletes offer 45 minutes of striking circus work - elaborate dancing in midair, dangerous balancing, unreal body-bending, aerial fabric work, and just about anything on stilts. Laura Stokes is like an otherworldly insect in her ceiling-level contortions with fabric. On the floor, she stands on one foot and rests her chin on the toes of the other.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Though Daniel Olushola Dada has lived in the United States for 26 years, his heart remains with the Yoruba people in the western region of his native Nigeria. For 15 years, Dada, 52, who lives in Bethel Township and practices medicine in Chester, has sought to build a medical clinic in Ibadan, a city of about 1.2 million near the Nigerian coastline, not far from the Yoruba village where he grew up. The pediatrician has enlisted the help of several other Nigerian-born doctors living in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Just when you thought that pop art was safely behind us, a new generation of hip '90s artists comes along and reinvents it. Not that pop art needed reinventing - once around that block was more than enough. No matter. In contemporary art, the wheel is continually being reborn. Old ideas are recycled with the regularity and inevitability of political slogans. A bit of spin on the delivery creates the illusion of a breakthrough. It also brings us to "Pop Politics," a three-artist exhibition at the Tyler and Temple galleries.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Because his images are so personal and so maddeningly enigmatic, Max Ernst (1891-1976) is one of the most challenging artists of this century. He also occupies a central position in two major modernist movements, dada and surrealism. He may be difficult to comprehend, but he's too important to be ignored. "Max Ernst: Dada and the Dawn of Surrealism," at the Museum of Modern Art through May 2, earnestly attempts to document the origins of Ernst's unconventional style of image-making, which had a lasting effect on 20th- century art. It looks at the early and lesser-known Ernst, before he became a prominent surrealist in Paris in the mid-1920s.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Imitation is the sincerest form of marketing in pop music. Meaning: If one or two groups do well in a genre - as post-modern rebels R.E.M. and 10,000 Maniacs have - then many more strivers in the same vein will be quickly signed by record labels and shoved before the willing public. And so, among this fall's album releases we find a veritable deluge of alternative rock groups fronted by elliptical, high-reaching poets. Here are some of them: The Wallflowers (Virgin). Thirty years ago, Bob Dylan radicalized pop by setting cynical, poetically ambitious and ambiguous lyrics in a folk (and later folk-rock)
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Devotees have come to expect some mighty odd twists from the big daddies of dada pop, They Might Be Giants - tonight's main attraction at the Trocadero. After all, this is the revolutionary duo that mixes succinct and sunny Beatlesque tunes (as often scored with lead accordion as with electric guitar) with perversely comic or just plain dark lyrics - from "Kiss Me, Son of God" to the payola plaint "Hey, Mr. DJ, I Though You Said We Had a Deal. " And who could ignore such death-defying delights as "I'll Sink Manhattan," "The Mortician's Daughter" and "Dig My Grave"?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | By Penny Jeannechild, Special to The Inquirer
What do you think the following have in common: An ode to the buttocks and trash as musical instrument. Elephant execution by hanging and buoyant BINGO. Genocide and laughter. Give up? They're all art. Silly art. Serious art. To be precise, Dada. "Anything can be Dada. If you say it is, it is," says Billy Ehret, the Painted Bride Art Center's gallery director and performance curator. "Dada Again" is the Bride's fourth annual celebration of Dada and surrealism. A European art movement rooted in the political and the absurd, Dada moved to New York City with Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp during World War I. Tonight's send-up starts at 8, and the 12 planned pieces run the gamut.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | By Maciej Pawlicki, Inquirer Staff Writer
The artist Man Ray once declared that his goal was "to accuse, bewilder, annoy or to inspire reflection. " He was mistaken by putting in or. There's nothing wrong with annoying and inspiring reflection, or provoking artistic shock and provoking brain activity. He succeeded at both. Man Ray's current exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art shows an artist who rebelled against art as a conventional form of expression. For him, art had very little to do with fitting into established patterns and very much to do with breaking them, turning them upside down, mocking them.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It has been observed that the arrival of "Perpetual Motif: The Art of Man Ray" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art represents a double measure of poetic justice. The retrospective, which originated at the National Museum of American Art in Washington in December, is concluding in Man Ray's nominal home town and in a museum that holds an exceptional collection of work by his close friend and aesthetic soulmate, Marcel Duchamp. The Duchamp connection is particularly fitting, for no other American artist embraced the spirit of the satiric dada movement as wholeheartedly as Man Ray. If Duchamp was the father of dada, Man Ray was its first cousin.
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