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Daffodils

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NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ah, wonderful February. Isn't this just the ideal moment for daffodils? Yes, yes, those bright yellow trumpeters of the approach of spring. Think it's too early for daffodils? Stick your nose out into that bracing 20-degree weather. Go ahead, live dangerously. And some daffs are sticking up their noses, right back at you. So defrost your schnozz. And take heart. Despite the heaviest snowfall in Philadelphia in more than 100 years, despite a month of snow cover on lawns from before Christmas to late January, despite the current visitation of a Siberian chiller, there is - yes, there is - going to be a spring.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
There were no daffodils at the site when Kitty Lapp and her husband, Vernon, purchased their Montgomery County home in the mid-1960s. But over the years they planted thousands of the flowers, and now spring in the garden is a glorious sight, with broad sweeps of daffodils glowing beneath huge oaks and buttonwood trees. With the daffodils, the couple planted wildflowers - American ginger, Jacob's ladder, bloodroot and varieties of bleeding heart, all of which have flowers that complement the daffodils.
NEWS
April 10, 1995
The whole, darn winter seemed to go out like a lamb. (What are we supposed to do with the bags of salt?) So the karate chop comes when? The first week of April - arctic winds, cops directing traffic in mittens, nighttime temperatures in the 20s. We were happy to see that - except for some weak-kneed magnolias - the flower world didn't close down in protest. Along the replanted stretch of Vine, just beyond Logan Square, the trees remain in full, loyal bloom. And the daffodils have been troupers, keeping their sunny sides irrepressibly up. The forsythia, too. Soon, we see by the schedule printed in last week's Magazine, the trout lily will be out. Then, just after the holidays, the Japanese maple, the white royal azalea and wave after wave of the common garden tulip.
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | By Larry Parker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What town has just gained thousands of new ways to celebrate spring? If you've driven through Mount Holly lately and seen the brilliant displays of daffodils in front of the municipal building, Memorial Hospital of Burlington County and the Old Courthouse - not to mention dozens of other places in the township - you probably know the answer. "It's just so yellow," said Judy Macurdy of Lumberton, president of the Mount Holly Garden Club. "It's neat. " Macurdy and her fellow Garden Club members spent many a weekend down on their hands and knees in dirt last October and November, planting the onion- like bulbs that are now blossoming.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oodles of daffodils. That's what Joan Lenhardt remembers most about the historic Selma Mansion in Norristown. Yes, the Federal-style manor on West Airy Street was once the home of a Revolutionary War general and of the mother of Mary Todd Lincoln. But when Lenhardt, as a young girl, walked by on her way to school, it was all about the estate's field of yellow flowers. "Not only do I remember the daffodils, my mother remembers the daffodils," said the now 70-something Lenhardt, of East Norriton.
LIVING
October 15, 2004 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Van de Wetering is a nurseryman on a mission: to make bulb planting easy as 1-2-3. Experienced gardeners may think nature took care of that. But research indicates that gardeners have been planting fewer bulbs, partly because they find the process too complicated - different bulbs have to be planted at different depths and at certain times of year. So Van de Wetering and his team at Ivy Acres wholesale nursery on Long Island set out to "take all of the complexity and mystery out of fall bulb planting.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Tom Faro of Reagan Advertising can attest to our unusually mild weather lately, as he works on a billboard on Delaware Avenue near Oregon Avenue yesterday, with the city skyline as a backdrop. However, the unexpected weather patterns have produced some problems, with daffodils prematurely peeking above the frost and some bears thinking that the hibernating season is over.
NEWS
December 11, 1995 | For The Inquirer / ELIZABETH ROBERTSON
Mix mix mix. Fifth graders (from left) Lauren Ames of the Elizabeth Haddon School in Haddonfield and Leonya Coombs and Nafeese Gaines of Camden's Cream School teamed up on a community project Friday, mixing dirt for daffodils that will be given to the elderly.
NEWS
October 22, 2010 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, DAILY PRESS
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Whether your garden is lush with too many plants or lacking the lovely look it deserves, there is a common cure: spring-flowering bulbs. "Bulbs are incredibly important in the landscape because they give an early seasonal pizzazz of color that would not normally be present without them," says Becky Heath of Brent & Becky's Bulbs in Gloucester, Va. Autumn is when you plant early-season beauties such as crocuses, daffodils, hyacinths, scilla, snowdrops, and tulips because they require a long period of cool temperatures to spark the biochemical process that causes them to flower in spring.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
In a cozy corner of a quaint inn, Judith Elder is in a tizzy of anticipation, plumping pillows and planting daffodils for the benefit of tourists hoping to find a friend in Pennsylvania this summer. Planting daffodils, at this time of year? "Any reasonably well-informed person that knows anything at all about daffodils and horticulture ought to know that daffodils are planted in the fall," lectured City Councilman John Street, as he held before Council yesterday a state Department of Commerce ad containing a photo feature of Elder's preparations for the tourist season.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2014
THE DAFFODILS are sprouting, the grass is growing. It's time to hire some kid to mow the lawn so you can dive into beer-drinking season. Put these events and beers on your springtime to-drink list.   Events Arbrew Day, tomorrow TreePhilly and Yards Brewing will encourage beer drinkers to exercise their green thumbs with a pint and a spade. Get planting with a cold glass of Yards ale and a free yard tree and T-shirt at these participating bars: Bourbon Blue (2 Rector St., Manayunk)
NEWS
April 14, 2013
Stephen Berg is a stay-at-home father and blogger Recently, my 11-year-old son, Henry, and I drove with a couple of friends to a dear family friend's funeral. Before Daniel Palomino died, Henry was aware of his long and difficult battle with cancer, and, as it progressed, we would share appropriate detail. So when Daniel died and I asked Henry if he wanted to come to his funeral, he did not hesitate. The majority of the time was spent outdoors in a beautiful wooded setting where Henry was able to ask questions, walk around freely, and be a part of the send-off in a very special manner.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oodles of daffodils. That's what Joan Lenhardt remembers most about the historic Selma Mansion in Norristown. Yes, the Federal-style manor on West Airy Street was once the home of a Revolutionary War general and of the mother of Mary Todd Lincoln. But when Lenhardt, as a young girl, walked by on her way to school, it was all about the estate's field of yellow flowers. "Not only do I remember the daffodils, my mother remembers the daffodils," said the now 70-something Lenhardt, of East Norriton.
NEWS
October 22, 2010 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, DAILY PRESS
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Whether your garden is lush with too many plants or lacking the lovely look it deserves, there is a common cure: spring-flowering bulbs. "Bulbs are incredibly important in the landscape because they give an early seasonal pizzazz of color that would not normally be present without them," says Becky Heath of Brent & Becky's Bulbs in Gloucester, Va. Autumn is when you plant early-season beauties such as crocuses, daffodils, hyacinths, scilla, snowdrops, and tulips because they require a long period of cool temperatures to spark the biochemical process that causes them to flower in spring.
LIVING
October 15, 2004 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Van de Wetering is a nurseryman on a mission: to make bulb planting easy as 1-2-3. Experienced gardeners may think nature took care of that. But research indicates that gardeners have been planting fewer bulbs, partly because they find the process too complicated - different bulbs have to be planted at different depths and at certain times of year. So Van de Wetering and his team at Ivy Acres wholesale nursery on Long Island set out to "take all of the complexity and mystery out of fall bulb planting.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Come spring, the road to Thornton will be awash with thousands of sunny daffodils swaying in the breeze - at least, that's the plan. Inspired by a similar scene on Nantucket Island in Massachusetts, Jane Anderman, a member of Thornbury's Park and Recreation Board, has organized a mass daffodil planting - more than 17,000 bulbs - along Glen Mills Road for the first weekend of next month. It will take a troop of volunteers to get the bulbs in the ground, she said. "If people are willing to get down on their hands and knees and get the bulbs in, pointy side up, we can use them," Anderman said with a laugh, adding that no gardening experience is necessary.
NEWS
January 4, 2000 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Violets bloomed in Germantown. Daffodil shoots pushed up from the earth in North Philadelphia. For the second straight day, humans strolled around the city in sweaters or shirt sleeves instead of ski parkas. What a January! And it's not only that the mercury hit a record high of 63 degrees yesterday - a degree higher than the previous high for the date, reached in 1913. Just look at the first three days of the new millennium. They've averaged about 48 degrees - and that's 16 degrees higher than the usual edge-of-freezing temperature for the first three days of January, the National Weather Service says.
LIVING
May 10, 1999 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Turn on sports-talk radio and you would think that sports team executives are only a half-step up from Lucifer and the bad guy who ties women to the railroad tracks in silent movies. But a look around college campuses this spring tells a different story. If being a college commencement speaker is any indication of hipness, then those sports-world fat cats should start thinking about doing their own soft-drink and sneaker ads. Right here in the Philadelphia area, for instance, you can find 76ers president-fitness guru Pat Croce giving the commencement address at West Chester University; New Jersey Nets owner Lewis Katz doing the honors at Rutgers-Camden, and alum John Beake, general manager of the Denver Broncos, speaking to grads of the College of New Jersey (although it was the more prosaic Trenton State College when Beake graduated in 1961)
LIVING
March 6, 1998 | By Hilary Jay, FOR THE INQUIRER
Down the driveway of the University of Pennsylvania's Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill, three 12-foot magnolia trees exuberantly display their snow white blossoms. In the garden of Center City's Tenth Presbyterian Church, forsythia glows golden as Philadelphia gets yet more rain. Crocuses, daffodils, even tulips are up in Haddonfield neighborhoods, ready to burst open if they haven't already. Mother Nature is running way out in front. What's going on? Some weather watchers blame El Nino for the climatic curve ball that has flowers, bushes and trees blooming ahead of schedule.
LIVING
October 4, 1996 | By Marty Ross, FOR THE INQUIRER
Spring-flowering bulbs are not only the brightest, most welcome flowers of all, but also the easiest to grow. You really can't tell by looking in the bins of curious, crinkly tulip, daffodil and hyacinth bulbs stacked to the rafters at garden centers now, but each bulb contains a little stroke of genius. Now's the time to plant them for the whole world to see. "A fun trend in gardening is, nowadays, not to plant just for ourselves, not just to make our back yards beautiful, but to plant something in the front yard that others can enjoy," says Brent Heath, a third-generation bulb grower and supplier and manager of the Daffodil Mart in Torrington, Conn.
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