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NEWS
April 9, 2003 | By MARK SEGAL
JOURNALISM is an art. But it parades its words as a science at times. We in the news business take printed words and give them to what we hope is an eager public wanting facts. We try to do that in an interesting way without being sensationalistic. When the news is something completely new, like the recent SARS epidemic, we give as much information as possible and as many viewpoints. I learned this from Daily News editor Zack Stalberg and former editorial page editor Richard Aregood.
NEWS
July 3, 2003
Staff writer Bob Warner and the Daily News should be ashamed of themselves for the article on June 21, about Joseph F. Hoffman Jr. Hoffman, who is a son of a Democratic ward leader, threw out "more than twice as many tickets as anybody else" in a six-year period. Does the Daily News commend Hoffman on his excessive productivity? No. Does the Daily News give credit to Hoffman for saving the city at least another person's salary and benefits costs for that six-year period?
NEWS
February 14, 1995 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Richard Aregood, whose take-no-prisoners editorials helped define the Daily News for two decades, is leaving the paper to take a job with The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J. Aregood's decision to leave the Daily News was prompted in part by disagreements with editor Zachary Stalberg over the mission of the editorial and opinion pages, as well as cutbacks in his department. During his years on the Daily News, Aregood won journalism's top awards for editorial writing, including the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
The Daily News loves to fight for the little guy. Well, score one for the Daily News and two of its fearless reporters. Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman won the Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism Monday for a series of stories that exposed a rogue police narcotics squad. Kudos, too, to Inquirer cartoonist Tony Auth, a Pulitzer finalist for his drawings "expressing consistently fearless positions on national and local issues. " The awards once again affirm the important role that vibrant newspapers play - even in tough times - not just here in the Cradle of Liberty, but across America.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Attorney and former mayoral candidate Charles W. Bowser has filed suit against the Daily News and Daily News associate editor Don Williamson, charging that he was the victim of false and defamatory statements in a column written by Williamson. In a suit filed in Common Pleas Court, Bowser accused Williamson of describing him as a black bigot and of making other disparaging remarks in a column about last summer's Urban Journalism Workshop for minority high school students, sponsored by the Daily News and the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund.
NEWS
November 3, 2006
THE Daily News had the Phillies making the playoffs on the Monday before the season ended, and we know how that turned out. On Nov. 1, six days before the election, your headline said, "All over but the voting. " Headlines like these are more hurtful than helpful. Perhaps the third time you're inclined to predict the future, you'll bite your tongues and think how you might have blown it for us twice before. Stan Gibell Philadelphia
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | BY HARRY RYAN
I remember when there were nine daily newspapers in New York City? Many Philadelphians have never forgotten the deceased Bulletin's slogan: In Philadelphia, Nearly Everybody Reads The Bulletin. Newspapers are dying. In this contemporary era, television has been the grotesque murderer of newspapers and magazines. Today, pay-for-TV-cable has been an ugly motive for not reading newspapers. Newspapers are in my blood. I read newspapers voraciously. In the past golden age of newspapers, it was cranky typewriters, inexpensive copy paper, rewritemen receiving stories from reporters over old-time telephones.
NEWS
January 2, 2008
NOW THAT Philadelphia has already invested more than a half-BILLION dollars in stadia for "important" sports, the Daily News decides to take a position against the funding of a soccer-specific stadium in Chester? Why shouldn't soccer fans be able to watch their sport in an appropriate stadium? Is it that the money will be spent and earned outside the city? Or that your readers know nothing about the sport? Here's hoping the Legislature isn't listening. Peg Manning Eastsound, WA I don't think Barack Obama has much of a chance at winning the presidency because of his Muslim-sounding name.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
GOV. Wolf has quietly appointed a new commissioner to the Delaware River Port Authority following a Daily News story last month that led to the abrupt resignation of Commissioner Whitney White. Wolf spokesman Jeff Sheridan confirmed yesterday that attorney Carl Singley - the former dean of Temple University's law school and onetime close friend of John Street - had been appointed to the DRPA's board on Aug. 4. Unlike Wolf's previous appointments, Singley's was not publicly announced.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
SHE RETIRED four months ago, but I still miss Denise Gallo, former office manager/den mother here at the Daily News . I miss her wicked humor, big heart and - desperately - cozy sweaters. Denise kept two of them on the back of her chair, and she lent them out regularly. My favorite was the faded red one. Heavy ribbed cotton, stretched out and oversized, with a high collar, brass zipper and deep pockets, it was my go-to add-on layer when I was goose-pimpled from air conditioning set too high or heat set too low. Barely any Daily News men have shivered at their desks the way most of the women have.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SEEMED as if Richard Johnson was always looking after society's underdogs. As a criminal-defense lawyer, his concern for his clients extended well beyond the courtroom. "He wanted to encourage his clients to turn their lives around," said his daughter, Diahnne. "He tried to show them there was a better way to live. " And when Richard worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, one of his jobs was to make sure minority workers got a fair shake. Richard Ernest Johnson, who opened his own law office in Center City in the mid-'70s, a history and news junkie who devoured newspapers and magazines and kept up with TV news shows, and a devoted family patriarch, died of heart failure July 31. He was 89 and lived in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN TATTLE leaves the Daily News or the Daily News leaves Tattle, we may set up shop as a professional denier. We'll sign up clients - celebrities will be the easiest, but politicians and athletes will be big - and then whenever something appears online from one crackpot source or another, we'll deny it. Nicki Minaj and Meek Mill split? Will happen some day, but for now we deny it. The Naval officer in Tennessee who fired his gun at the killer is being "charged" by "the Obama administration"?
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
BEFORE YOU COULD ask, "What will 'Person E' do next?" Philadelphia heard from longtime NBC10 anchor Renee Chenault-Fattah in a letter to her bosses. And more questions arose. Federal prosecutors alleged Wednesday in an 85-page indictment against her husband, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, and four others that Chenault-Fattah fraudulently sold her 1989 Porsche Carrera to a Florida-based lobbyist for $18,000. "Both the indictment and media accounts are incorrect," she said in her letter to the local NBC affiliate, parts of which were included in a report posted on the station's website yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
LAST WEDNESDAY, Hien Bui was angry and tense. She was puzzled why the city and the Philadelphia Housing Authority would want to shut down the North Philadelphia nail salon her mother started nearly 23 years ago and put another business in its place. "I couldn't sleep last night," Bui said Thursday, the day after she got a letter from the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority telling her that PHA planned to seize her business under eminent domain. Bui said she's been running Ann's Nails, on Ridge Avenue near 23rd Street, for 18 years.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA & DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN MARCH, James Harris left a comment on Jasmine Wright's Facebook page, words forever branded on her public, electronic memorial. "All in," he posted, with a picture of a dozen roses that said: "For you. " Under other circumstances, it would have been an innocuous gesture. But with yesterday's news, it twists into something ominous and morbid. Harris, a/k/a James Camp, has been charged with allegedly raping and murdering Wright, 27, on July 15 inside her apartment in the West Philly building where he had been the maintenance man, police said.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A NEW JERSEY probation officer has been suspended without pay after an alleged altercation in Camden with the naked and dripping-wet mother of a man on probation. Police said Arlena Cook was taking a shower on July 7 when Romero Lundy, an officer with the state's Intensive Supervision Program, visited her home on Collings Road to check on her son Ladobe May-Garber, 21, who was on probation for a drug-possession arrest last year. After Cook and Lundy argued about whether he was allowed in the house, the officer allegedly pushed Cook, who was still dripping wet and holding a towel around herself.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IN ADDITION TO Eric Becoats, several of the district's recent hires for senior positions come from the growing charter-school sector: * Jeff Rhodes, assistant superintendent of Learning Network 9, spent two years as director of school quality at Michigan-based National Heritage Academies, a charter-management operator with about 51,000 students. * Christina Grant, assistant superintendent of the Opportunity Network for district-run and contracted alternative education programs, worked for 2 1/2 years at the Great Oaks Foundation, a charter-management organization with five schools, where she was superintendent.
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