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NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By Melinda Deanna Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Residents living near the Rosenberger Dairies property in East Bradford have appeared before the Planning Commission to oppose plans to develop the site as a retail commercial center. Developer William Freas asked the commission on Tuesday to comment on revised plans for development of the property. The original plans showed the construction of a commercial center and townhouses, but the new proposal is for a commercial complex only. Freas plans to appear before the Zoning Board to request a zoning change for the portion of the site that is zoned for residential use. But residents living near the dairy, at Neal Street and Route 52, are concerned about the increased traffic that a retail center would produce.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An attorney for Bechtel Dairies Inc. says he will ask a federal judge to lift the order that froze the company's assets and accused it of selling diluted and adulterated milk to local schools, federal veterans' hospitals and stores. Geoffrey L. Beauchamp described as "baseless" allegations made against Bechtel Dairies in a civil lawsuit filed last week by the U.S. Attorney's Office. Beauchamp said that tomorrow he would ask for an emergency hearing on the restraining order and seek to have it lifted.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1993 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kraft General Foods yesterday said it would close the Philadelphia headquarters of its National Dairy Products Corp., which employs 203 people. The company said it expected that at least half the 165 management employees would be transferred to other Kraft and General Foods offices in White Plains, N.Y., and Glenview, Ill. The others will be laid off, but may be offered other jobs with Kraft. The office, in Seven Penn Center, manages several dairy food brands, including its Sealtest and Cool Whip frozen desserts and the company's sour cream, cheese and yogurt brands.
REAL_ESTATE
April 27, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
In South Philadelphia's Newbold neighborhood, Anna Maria and Carmen Vona have renovated the historic Abbotts Alderney Dairies building at 1715-1719 McKean St. The couple own and operate a business in a rear building on the parcel, which takes up nearly the entire block. But they have renovated 10,000 square feet in the two-story front structure, facing McKean and Colorado Streets, into apartment and office space at a cost of about $400,000. The Vonas did most of the work themselves.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | By Terry Bivens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The company chairman, Harry Goldberg, is 87. His son, Raymond, the president and chief executive, is 62. Then there's Ray's son Rick, the executive vice president. And Ray's daughter, Robin Goldberg Batoff, who's director of marketing. If you've surmised that this is a family business of some duration, you are correct. And what a business this Penn Maid is. In contrast to the many regional dairy companies that have long since folded to giants like Sealtest and Kraft, Penn Maid Foods Inc. still flies proudly the independent family colors of the smiling cow, Queenie.
FOOD
March 16, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
If you are a coffee drinker who reaches eagerly for powdered, non-dairy creamers for your brew, thinking they are somehow better for you than milk, half-and-half or real cream, two Nebraska researchers suggest that you think again. In fact, say the two researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, the two chief ingredients in 22 of the 25 non-dairy coffee whiteners on the market have a pronounced ability to increase the concentrations of potentially harmful fat levels in the blood.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I've heard that calcium can interfere with the absorption of certain prescription medications. Does that include almond milk, yogurt, and cheese, too? Answer: Dairy products and calcium can bind up certain medications in the stomach, reducing their absorption and efficacy. Almond "milk" is not actually a dairy product, however, so it does not have this effect. Medications whose absorption can potentially be reduced by the dairy products or calcium supplements include: Levaquin and Cipro antibiotics; iron supplements; osteoporosis drugs like Fosamax and Actonel; Synthroid (levothyroxine)
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
It offers a corn maze, pumpkin picking, and hayrides, but Milky Way Farm at heart is a dairy business that's been run by the Matthews family for more than a century. Lately it hasn't been easy. Wholesale milk prices continue to fall; expenses continue to rise. The Matthews have had to sell a few of their cows. In short, the 103-acre farm in Chester Springs, Chester County, has a lot in common with other dairy farms across the country. "We can't just be dairy farms anymore," said Carolyn Eaglehouse, 47, whose father and stepmother, Sam and Melba Matthews, own Milky Way. Eaglehouse helps run the farm with her sister and brother and their families.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wawa Inc. is ready to start next week on a $30 million, five-year expansion of its dairy and warehouse operations off Baltimore Pike. At a meeting Monday night, the Township Council voted, 4-0, to approve final plans for Wawa, with a list of conditions that included correcting the odor problem stemming from the dairy's pre-treatment sewage plant. Wawa officials have said that the company has more than 500 convenience stores and expects that number to double by the turn of the century.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wawa Inc. does not want to leave its home town, but its dairy definitely is facing growing pains, company officials say. In 1929, when the dairy was built, it produced milk primarily for home delivery. All that changed in 1964, when Wawa opened its first convenience store. Wawa now has 516 stores, and expects that number to double by the turn of the century, said Vincent Anderson, Wawa vice president and general counsel. To meet its stores' growing demand for milk and juice, Wawa must expand its dairy and warehouse operations, he said.
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NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
It offers a corn maze, pumpkin picking, and hayrides, but Milky Way Farm at heart is a dairy business that's been run by the Matthews family for more than a century. Lately it hasn't been easy. Wholesale milk prices continue to fall; expenses continue to rise. The Matthews have had to sell a few of their cows. In short, the 103-acre farm in Chester Springs, Chester County, has a lot in common with other dairy farms across the country. "We can't just be dairy farms anymore," said Carolyn Eaglehouse, 47, whose father and stepmother, Sam and Melba Matthews, own Milky Way. Eaglehouse helps run the farm with her sister and brother and their families.
FOOD
August 7, 2015
Dairy downtown The weekly farmers' market at High Street on Market has been bringing in a slew of special guests for tastings and cooking demos. This week it's Berks County's Valley Milkhouse, a dairy making cheese, yogurt, butter, and buttermilk. Check out the cultured buttermilk, made with nothing but pasteurized cream, cultures, and salt. Valley Milkhouse buttermilk, $7 for a quart Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., outside High Street on Market, 308 Market St., Philadelphia, 215-625-0988.
FOOD
July 31, 2015 | Inquirer Staff
Dairy-free and delish If you're keeping Kosher, have a dairy allergy, or just really like cookies, check out Nomoo Cookie Company. The Pipersville bakeshop makes especially good dairy- and preservative-free gingersnaps with molasses and crystalized ginger, and double-chocolate cookies with Belgian chocolate and espresso powder. - Samantha Melamed Nomoo cookies, $3.29 each at Carlino's Specialty Foods, 2616 E. County Line Road, Ardmore, 610-649-4046. Order by the dozen ($19.95)
REAL_ESTATE
April 27, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
In South Philadelphia's Newbold neighborhood, Anna Maria and Carmen Vona have renovated the historic Abbotts Alderney Dairies building at 1715-1719 McKean St. The couple own and operate a business in a rear building on the parcel, which takes up nearly the entire block. But they have renovated 10,000 square feet in the two-story front structure, facing McKean and Colorado Streets, into apartment and office space at a cost of about $400,000. The Vonas did most of the work themselves.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert James Harbison 3d, 92, of Lafayette Hill, who guided his family's dairy business from horse-drawn delivery routes to a modern-day business merger, died Sunday, March 15, of complications from a stroke at the Hill at Whitemarsh. In 1947, he joined Harbisons Dairies, becoming president and CEO in 1952. He was the fourth generation of Harbisons to lead the dairy founded by Robert Harbison in 1865. Under his leadership, Harbisons Dairies in Kensington grew to about 700 employees, with 385 home-delivery milk routes and six plants.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CAVEMEN had all the time in the world. Those single-minded Homo sapiens didn't have to worry about multitasking or time clocks. Which is why weary home cooks following a gluten-free diet - or simply trying to feed their families fresh, healthful food - may say "paleo-schmaleo" when trying to follow in our ancestors' knuckle-dragging steps. The much-hyped paleo diet - or lifestyle, if you will - tosses out the agricultural products incorporated into the human diet over the past, say, 10,000 years in favor of a whole-foods approach to eating meat, plants and seafood that dates back to cave-dwelling days.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
SLOW-COOKER COCOA Mars' upscale, old-fashioned American Heritage brand offers this extra-rich recipe that calls for three kinds of dairy and grated chocolate with origins in 1750. 14 ounces sweetened condensed milk 1 pint heavy cream 6 cups whole milk 12.72-ounce package American Heritage Chocolate Finely Grated Chocolate Drink Put all ingredients in a slow cooker. Set on low and stir frequently. You do not want the milk to scald. Cook for approximately 2 hours or until the chocolate is melted.
FOOD
September 19, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
The old laundry paddle is retired, wedged beside the blackboard in our kitchen, a totem now. Its handle is sawed off to utensil-height, a hole drilled in it for hanging, its blade worn smooth as river stone. Fritz Blank, who once used it to stir his grand copper pots, bequeathed it to me - autographed, for good measure - as he was packing up his haute French classic Deux Cheminees at 12th and Locust, getting ready to decamp with his cat Bobo to Thailand. That was seven years ago. And it hasn't stirred since: It seemed unseemly to dunk the thing - so accustomed to the likes of truffled sauce Perigord - in our more prosaic chicken paprikash, fish stews, and Frog-Commissary vegetarian chili.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having weathered the economic ups and downs of farming and, yes, the weather itself, members of the Linvill family are celebrating what they call their crowning success: surviving 100 years in a volatile business. These days, the family stead in the heart of Delaware County is as much county fair and education as it is produce, but from all indications it is a thriving enterprise. Growing from a 10-cow dairy farm dairy to a 300-acre fruit-and-vegetable complex on West Knowlton Road in Middletown Township, Linvilla Orchards has evolved into quite the popular venue.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Search the term milkman on Google, and a San Diego mash-up artist appears as the first hit. ("Milkman" plays "electro-hip/hop fusion" music and operates his own lasers.) Kevin Decker, 20, of Voorhees, is the right age to be a Milkman fan, but he's never heard of him. Decker is instead the real thing, something few of the electro-hip/hop generation have ever seen. He is a door-to-door milkman. "I always wear the white shirt," he said last week as he started his afternoon delivery run through Mount Laurel and Marlton.
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