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Dairy Barn

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NEWS
November 2, 1999 | By Susan Weidener and Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Authorities are still searching for the causes of two fires that devoured a barn and an auction house in southern Chester County late last week. State police are leading the probes in New London and Kennett Townships. Chester County Fire Marshal Harrison Holt said they had not yet found any answers. "Avenues [of investigation] are open," Holt said. An early morning fire on Saturday destroyed a barn at St. John's Dairy Farm in New London, eating up about 75 round bales of hay and causing about $200,000 in damage, said Jeffrey Simpson, deputy fire chief of the West Grove Fire Company.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT S. HAMRICK
Joe Rogers, assistant fire chief from Montgomery County Station 66, watches as firefighters aim water at a dairy barn in Trappe. More than 100 firfighters responded to yesterday's blaze, which destroyed the barn. Sparks from a hay conveyor ignited the fire. There were no injuries, and no livestock were hurt.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last weekend in Gap, Merle Ranck got a group of men together at a factory warehouse to build a small red building and attach it to a trailer. Call it a barn-raising. The little dairy barn will be trucked around Chester County, and from it, milkshakes and ice-cream cones will be sold at cow auctions and local fairs. Call it fund-raising. With health-conscious consumers warily eyeing milk and other dairy products, dairy farmers and their friends around the state have found the best target for better sales: the consumer's palate.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a week ago Wednesday that the men and women who have spent their lives tending Hope Montgomery Scott's prized herd of cattle were told their days at Ardrossan Farms were numbered. Edgar Scott Jr., son of the Main Line socialite who died Jan. 9 at age 90, summoned the workers to the office and told them of the family's decision to sell the 275 Ayrshire cattle. The farm, he said, was losing money. He told them they would have to vacate their rent-free homes on the 650- acre estate in Radnor by the end of the year.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bette Calkin left the Ridglea Dairy Store with a plastic gallon of milk and a heavy heart. Ridglea, known for farm-fresh milk sold in returnable glass jugs, was closing - and, in its final days, stocking only milk packaged in plastic. "I feel awful," Calkin, the mother of three youngsters, said the other day. "It is so sad. " Development marches on. Bucktown, in South Coventry Township in northern Chester County, is at the relatively major crossroads of Routes 23 and 100. South Coventry's population grew 13 percent from 1990 to 1998, according to the Census Bureau.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Lisa Borders, Special to The Inquirer
Madonna, Lilac, Jellybean and 97 of their pals had to hoof it to their new home at Delaware Valley College, but they seem none the worse for wear. For these cows and heifers - who can thank the college's agriculture students for their names - moving in February from a college-run, 42-acre farm on Route 202 in Doylestown meant a bit of a walk and a few sore feet as the cattle adjusted to the concrete floors of their new surroundings. For the 25 to 30 students who use the new dairy barn each semester, the move has meant less time on chores, less bending over and a more thorough survey of dairy farm practices, said Jesse Howe, dairy barn superintendent, last week.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The new solar dairy barn here is a palace for cows, complete with padded mattresses made from ground-up rubber tires. The black screen walls roll up in the summer to keep the cows cool. The animals can roam around the spacious barn, or they can lie down. They even have a computerized milking parlor. The University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine at New Bolton Center has completed construction of the Marshak Dairy Facility, the first greenhouse-type dairy barn in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 6, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Thompson, 88, of Phoenixville, a dairyman who became a successful golf-course owner, died of renal failure Sunday at home. For more than 20 years, Mr. Thompson operated Maplecroft, a dairy farm, milk-processing and home-delivery operation, and retail store in Phoenixville. In 1981, Mr. Thompson sold his cows and, with his six sons, developed Pickering Valley Golf Course, which opened in 1985 on the site of his former farm. Several years later, he told a reporter that he knew absolutely nothing about the game, but that since opening the course, he observed that golfers were "filled with good spirits" when they headed out to play.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | By Stephanie Grace, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The cows have finally come home. The abandoned dairy barn on the grounds of Mount Laurel's PAWS (Preservation and Wildlife Society) Farm Nature Center had seen better days when the center took it over in 1979. But now, the big old barn that was home to dairy cows for more than a century has been restored to its former glory. It houses PAWS' new "Moo-trition Market," a miniature supermarket and display aimed at teaching young visitors about the five main food groups - grains, protein, fruits, vegetables and, of course, dairy.
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NEWS
July 6, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Thompson, 88, of Phoenixville, a dairyman who became a successful golf-course owner, died of renal failure Sunday at home. For more than 20 years, Mr. Thompson operated Maplecroft, a dairy farm, milk-processing and home-delivery operation, and retail store in Phoenixville. In 1981, Mr. Thompson sold his cows and, with his six sons, developed Pickering Valley Golf Course, which opened in 1985 on the site of his former farm. Several years later, he told a reporter that he knew absolutely nothing about the game, but that since opening the course, he observed that golfers were "filled with good spirits" when they headed out to play.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bette Calkin left the Ridglea Dairy Store with a plastic gallon of milk and a heavy heart. Ridglea, known for farm-fresh milk sold in returnable glass jugs, was closing - and, in its final days, stocking only milk packaged in plastic. "I feel awful," Calkin, the mother of three youngsters, said the other day. "It is so sad. " Development marches on. Bucktown, in South Coventry Township in northern Chester County, is at the relatively major crossroads of Routes 23 and 100. South Coventry's population grew 13 percent from 1990 to 1998, according to the Census Bureau.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Cochranville tenant farmer Bryan Huff was ready to take his wife, their two daughters, and their prize-winning herd of Jersey dairy cows and move to Wisconsin. "The land was reasonable, the feed was cheaper, the taxes were cheaper, and it was a dairy economy," said Huff, 39. But his wife, Patricia, who grew up on a dairy farm in Chester County, wasn't ready to move. Now, the Huffs, who run the farm by themselves, are about to buy their own, 155-acre spread in West Nottingham, thanks to a new state initiative called the Next Generation Farmer Loan Program and to a retired couple anxious to keep as a farm the land they have loved.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | By Susan Weidener and Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Authorities are still searching for the causes of two fires that devoured a barn and an auction house in southern Chester County late last week. State police are leading the probes in New London and Kennett Townships. Chester County Fire Marshal Harrison Holt said they had not yet found any answers. "Avenues [of investigation] are open," Holt said. An early morning fire on Saturday destroyed a barn at St. John's Dairy Farm in New London, eating up about 75 round bales of hay and causing about $200,000 in damage, said Jeffrey Simpson, deputy fire chief of the West Grove Fire Company.
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Firefighters douse the last of a blaze that roared through a dairy barn at the Chester Hills Farm in Franklin Township, Chester County. The farm's 180 cows were in the pasture when the barn caught fire yesterday, farmer Willis Hocking said. West Grove Fire Chief John Chambers called the blaze accidental.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The new solar dairy barn here is a palace for cows, complete with padded mattresses made from ground-up rubber tires. The black screen walls roll up in the summer to keep the cows cool. The animals can roam around the spacious barn, or they can lie down. They even have a computerized milking parlor. The University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine at New Bolton Center has completed construction of the Marshak Dairy Facility, the first greenhouse-type dairy barn in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Even though children have returned to school and the intense heat of the summer may have passed, business at Petrucci's Dairy Barn is still brisk. Thirteen years ago, Michael Petrucci, a former hairstylist and semiprofessional bowler, took over a fledgling ice cream stand from his sister. The first Petrucci Dairy Barn was born. Several years later he opened a second Dairy Barn, in Bensalem. His wife Sandra runs the Bristol operation, and he and his son work in Bensalem. Running out of family members but eager to expand, Petrucci decided to do what few local ice cream companies have done before: imitate the big guys and start a franchise of their operation.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a week ago Wednesday that the men and women who have spent their lives tending Hope Montgomery Scott's prized herd of cattle were told their days at Ardrossan Farms were numbered. Edgar Scott Jr., son of the Main Line socialite who died Jan. 9 at age 90, summoned the workers to the office and told them of the family's decision to sell the 275 Ayrshire cattle. The farm, he said, was losing money. He told them they would have to vacate their rent-free homes on the 650- acre estate in Radnor by the end of the year.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | By Stephanie Grace, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The cows have finally come home. The abandoned dairy barn on the grounds of Mount Laurel's PAWS (Preservation and Wildlife Society) Farm Nature Center had seen better days when the center took it over in 1979. But now, the big old barn that was home to dairy cows for more than a century has been restored to its former glory. It houses PAWS' new "Moo-trition Market," a miniature supermarket and display aimed at teaching young visitors about the five main food groups - grains, protein, fruits, vegetables and, of course, dairy.
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