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Dairy Farmers

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NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ruling by the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board on Wednesday will boost annual payments to struggling Pennsylvania dairy farmers by an estimated $6.7 million, according to Gov. Rendell. "As one of the few states with the ability to affect pricing, Pennsylvania is taking decisive action to help its dairy producers," Rendell said Thursday. The projected payments are small in Pennsylvania's $1.5 billion industry, but given the industry's difficulties, "any revenue that's out there that can be returned to the farmer is positive, no matter how small," said John Frey, executive director of the state's Center for Dairy Excellence.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
More than 40 years ago, my husband and I began our life work as Pennsylvania dairy farmers. After a year of selling our milk to a small processing firm, we joined a dairy-marketing cooperative because it fit with our philosophy of farmers working together. Congress encouraged the co-op business philosophy in 1922, when it passed the Capper-Volstead Act, which gives farmers limited antitrust protection, enabling them to join together in organizations whose larger scale and marketing power allow them to seek better markets and prices.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a dilapidated farm building in Gloucester County, Owen Pool tugs at his sweat-stained "Got Milk?" cap, stretches out his bad knee, and tries to make sense of the dairy industry. Pool says he's losing money every time he milks a cow, thanks to a bewildering mix of circumstances that includes a U.S. cheese surplus, the decline of consumer demand in China, and the lack of precipitation in Australia last year. "I talk to this economist in D.C., to try and stay on top of things," said the 71-year-old dairy farmer.
NEWS
January 9, 1996 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Snow wasn't the only white stuff on the mind of Jonas King yesterday as he rode one of his horses toward a nearby farm. The Amish farmer, who lives in New Providence, in the southern part of Lancaster County, was thinking about milk, too. His 15-year-old son, David, told a neighbor that King was worried about how he was going to get two days' worth of milk, produced by 43 dairy cows, to a processor before it would be time to milk his cows...
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jody Hewitt is, in a manner of speaking, milking her father's cows for all they're worth these days. But what's good for Hewitt also is good for cows and their newborn calves. Hewitt, a student at Owen J. Roberts Middle School who is gaining a reputation as a budding research scientist, hopes that her two-year study on bovine colostrum may offer additional information in helping dairy farmers raise healthier cows. Colostrum is the pre-milk fluid secreted by the mammary glands shortly after the birth of the calves.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | By Russell J. Rickford, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mired in the soil of his East Greenwich farm, Owen Pool, 59, stood, ruddy-faced and worried. Over a creased brow, the "Got Milk?" slogan on his baseball cap seemed almost belligerent. Gray-eyed Damon Winner, 24, of Sunnyside Dairies, standing on the Westampton land his great-grandfather began farming in 1919, was full of verve. He was optimistic that the techniques he learned at Cornell University would sustain the family livelihood. Both are fourth-generation New Jersey dairymen.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001 | By Marc Levy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After running a dairy farm for 40 years, George and Evelyn Williams felt they could not continue the long hours when milk prices hit a nine-year-low last year. "After a while, you look at the price of milk and your profit for doing it," said Evelyn Williams, who, along with her husband, decided to sell their last 75 cows in August from their Salem County, N.J., farm. "And you wonder if it's worth it, you know, having no life other than dairy farming. " For many farmers, such hardships are the price of doing business on the open market.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Away from shopping malls and toll booths, tucked in the quiet pockets of New Jersey, the Garden State emerges true to its name with woods, rolling pastures and even cattle - about 21,000 of them. But while cows number fewer than Hondas (about 25,000), upheaval in the nation's dairy industry is threatening hundreds of farmers here, where herds graze mostly in northern and southern counties, and help create that less-known, endangered face of New Jersey. Yesterday, saying the state must help its dairy farmers and save their farmland from urban sprawl, the Senate approved a bill that would add New Jersey to a consortium of Northeastern states that collectively sets a minimum price that the region's dairy farmers may charge for their milk.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the Joy-Wil Farm near Oxford, Barry Hostetter is so confident about the quality of the milk his dairy cows produce that he serves it unpasteurized to his family for breakfast each morning. But since scientists at Rutgers University recently found drug-tainted milk in 20 percent of the samples taken from milk being sold in the Washington, D.C., suburbs, dairy farmers like Hostetter have been put on the defensive. Among the drugs scientists found in the samples were sulfamethazine, an antibiotic used to treat sick cattle but suspected of causing cancer in people.
NEWS
November 13, 2003
Congress takes steps to help Pa. dairy industry Your Oct. 20 article on dairy farmers, "Pressures souring region's farmers on dairy life," unfortunately paints a true picture of Pennsylvania's dairy industry. Without question, especially within the last 18 months, our dairy farmers have faced intense pressures related to low milk prices, the cost of production, and the encroachment of land development. In Washington, we're moving in several directions to provide relief to dairy farmers, who make up 40 percent of our state's agriculture industry.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred Wanner Jr., a dairy farmer in Narvon in Lancaster County, would love to see higher milk prices, but he knows a surge to $6 to $8 a gallon - expected if Congress failed to prevent 1940s milk-subsidy rules from taking effect - would do more harm than good. "Consumers will back off on their purchases. It'll just disrupt the whole market. It would not be a good situation," Wanner, whose family milks more than 600 cows on his farm, said in an interview Monday. It appeared late Monday that lawmakers in Washington were on track to approve an extension of the expired 2008 farm bill.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Lisa Rathke, Associated Press
DANVILLE, Vt. - Small dairy farmers in the Northeast and Wisconsin say a tough year has been made worse by Congress' failure to pass a new farm bill before the old one expired. While many farm programs have continued through the harvest season even though the farm bill expired Sept. 30, a program that pays dairy farmers when milk prices plummet has ended. Many dairy farms were already struggling with low milk prices and high fuel and feed costs as the worst drought in decades dried up grazing land and pushed up the price of hay and feed.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2012 | By Lisa Rathke and ASSOCIATED PRESS
Consumers will pay a little more for coffee and chocolate to ensure that the farmers who produce those foods get a fair wage. So why not ask them to pay more for milk? That's the notion behind a Vermont-based program designed to raise money for struggling New England dairy farms while educating consumers about those family businesses. Keep Local Farms urges colleges, universities, and other institutions in New England to charge a little more for milk, with the extra money going to the farmers.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Got milk? Pass the butter? Not in Kenya, where both of those staples are increasingly scarce because a drought-induced dairy shortage is wreaking havoc on the milk, butter, and yogurt shelves. Grocery store owners, restaurant managers, and customers are annoyed and frustrated that an item as basic as butter is almost impossible to find in what is frequently billed as East Africa's largest economy. Farmers are producing only 30 percent of the country's needs, causing milk prices to shoot up in recent weeks by nearly a third.
NEWS
March 13, 2012
A NEW JERSEY man and a cheese company were charged yesterday by the U.S. attorney in Philadelphia with shipping tainted cheese. Joseph G. Lotito, 42, of Annandale, and the Lebanon Cheese Co., of Lebanon, N.J., allegedly sold ricotta impastata - the cheese used to make cannoli filling - that was unfit for human consumption. He could face up to a year in prison and a $100,000 fine if convicted of the charge, and Lebanon could face five years' probation and a $200,000 fine. It's unknown whether any consumers of the cheese were harmed by the contaminated ricotta, which was allegedly delivered in August 2008 to a food market in Wyomissing, Pa. Authorities said that the cheese was manufactured from truckloads of raw milk that had been condemned by Pennsylvania dairy processors for failing screening tests for the presence of certain antibiotics.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | Associated Press
A New Jersey cheesemaker made its ricotta cheese from tainted milk that was on its way to a landfill, according to the U.S. Attorney's office in Philadelphia. The raw milk from Pennsylvania had been condemned because of high levels of antibiotics, authorities said. No injuries or illnesses were reported. Lebanon Cheese Co. of Lebanon, Hunterdon County, and its president, Joseph G. Lotito, were charged Monday with a misdemeanor interstate shipping charge. The company paid cash for the discounted milk from D.A. Landis Trucking Inc. of Lancaster, in 2008, although dairy farmers had pledged to dispose of it, prosecutors said.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
More than 40 years ago, my husband and I began our life work as Pennsylvania dairy farmers. After a year of selling our milk to a small processing firm, we joined a dairy-marketing cooperative because it fit with our philosophy of farmers working together. Congress encouraged the co-op business philosophy in 1922, when it passed the Capper-Volstead Act, which gives farmers limited antitrust protection, enabling them to join together in organizations whose larger scale and marketing power allow them to seek better markets and prices.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ruling by the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board on Wednesday will boost annual payments to struggling Pennsylvania dairy farmers by an estimated $6.7 million, according to Gov. Rendell. "As one of the few states with the ability to affect pricing, Pennsylvania is taking decisive action to help its dairy producers," Rendell said Thursday. The projected payments are small in Pennsylvania's $1.5 billion industry, but given the industry's difficulties, "any revenue that's out there that can be returned to the farmer is positive, no matter how small," said John Frey, executive director of the state's Center for Dairy Excellence.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a dilapidated farm building in Gloucester County, Owen Pool tugs at his sweat-stained "Got Milk?" cap, stretches out his bad knee, and tries to make sense of the dairy industry. Pool says he's losing money every time he milks a cow, thanks to a bewildering mix of circumstances that includes a U.S. cheese surplus, the decline of consumer demand in China, and the lack of precipitation in Australia last year. "I talk to this economist in D.C., to try and stay on top of things," said the 71-year-old dairy farmer.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Residents of Philadelphia and its Pennsylvania suburbs probably do not know it, but they pay at least 15 cents more per gallon for milk than Lehigh Valley residents. In a bid to halt this decades-old discrepancy instituted by the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board based on a calculation of production costs, the city yesterday petitioned for a reduction of the minimum price in the Philadelphia region to the state average. "We believe it is unwarranted and unjust to surcharge Philadelphia-area consumers 15 cents a gallon for milk that comes from the same cows, processed in the same plant, and driven the same amount of miles as the lower-priced milk," Lance Haver, director of the Philadelphia Mayor's Office of Consumer Affairs, wrote in a letter to board chairman Richard Kriebel.
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