CollectionsDairy Products
IN THE NEWS

Dairy Products

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
March 27, 1986 | By JAY GREENBERG, Daily News Sports Writer
Through wooden legs and failing spirits Murray Craven fought on. He was losing, though. You could see it in his stride, which was delivering him to the puck a half-second late; in his face, which grimaced at what had become a belabored effort; in his demeanor, which was increasingly that of the tortured. What the hell is wrong with me, Craven asked. You tell us, the Flyers replied. A year ago, in his first full NHL season since being rescued from Detroit's trash bin, Craven had scored 26 goals and 61 points.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
GENTLEMEN prefer blondes. This guy prefers Swiss. As in cheese - the kind normally found sandwiched between corned beef and rye on a Reuben. But this particular man is using his dairy products to satisfy a different craving. The Mayfair Town Watch reported yesterday on its Facebook page that the "Swiss Cheese Pervert" has been terrorizing neighborhood women. According to the group, the suspect, a heavyset white man estimated to be in his late 40s or early 50s, approaches women while driving a silver or black sedan with his genitals exposed.
NEWS
August 4, 2001
Milk is bad for you? Deanna Rose's claims (letter, July 27) that milk prevents osteoporosis and other illnesses is based on science that was disproved long ago. We now know that dairy products contribute to osteoporosis, diabetes, ADHD and a host of other diseases. Cow's milk is laced with antibiotics, hormones and proteins that are essentially poisons to the body. Did she earn her degree from the National Dairy Association? Matt Schweder, Lexington, Ky. Deanna Rose: Dairy products are good for nobody but baby cows; that's who God intended it for. Milk does not cause good strong bones; green vegetables do. As a health/nutrition consultant, I thank the Daily News for presenting both sides of the controversial milk issue.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Randall Mikkelsen, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After six years of giving away powdered milk, butter and cheese to millions of poor people, the government soon may not have any more to give. At the same time it has been emptying caves full of surplus dairy products through donations to charitable food-assistance programs, the government has been paying dairy farmers not to produce. Together, the policies have created a shortage of commodities to give away. "As we currently expect things to develop, we will not have the supplies to continue all the donation and export programs that we have had," said Jim Miller, a dairy analyst for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
SPORTS
March 27, 1986 | By Al Morganti, Inquirer Staff Writer
According to the commercials, Mike Schmidt drinks milk, and it helps him hit home runs. And Flyers captain Dave Poulin is featured in a life-size poster that extols the value of milk in helping kids grow big and strong. The idea is to have the kids measure up to their favorite athletes. But Murray Craven could drink milk until the cows come home, and it wouldn't do him any good. In fact, all those dairy products that Craven used to devour might have been devouring his energy.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2007
Meet the luckiest man in the world. Ernie Pinckney gets paid by Turkey Hill Dairy of Lancaster to eat ice cream. He also fields questions from the curious and passionate about the frozen treats for the company's blog at http://icecreamjournal . turkeyhill.com . Pinckney, 69, whose official title is special plant project coordinator, makes sure the quality and taste of the company's ice cream are consistent. He makes sure that the chocolates are sufficiently chocolaty and that swirls of flavor are in both the bottom and the top of the container.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1989 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
On a recent afternoon, Neal McDonald pulled his car beside the 25-foot, red-capped silo on Township Line Road in Drexel Hill as he has done nearly every week for a decade. McDonald, 80, didn't get out, but merely rolled down the window and exchanged plastic containers with a young clerk. Minutes later, he was driving home with his purchase beside him on the seat: a gallon of milk. The convenience has been enough to make him a regular customer at Swiss Farm. "The guy hands it to you, and that's it," he said.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
FAT-FREE CHILDREN. Parents, if your children love milk, push the fat-free variety. Dairy products have surpassed meat as the top source of unhealthy saturated fat in teenagers' diets, a researcher says. Studies by Curtis Ellison at two elite New England prep schools found 35 percent of students' daily intake of saturated fat comes from milk, cheese, ice cream and other dairy food. BIRTHMARK REMOVAL. A new laser treatment can safely erase port-wine stains from the faces of children, even during infancy, and often spare youngsters from growing up with these disfiguring birthmarks.
NEWS
February 14, 2008 | By LANCE HAVER
WHEN SENS. Clinton and Obama come to Pennsylvania to campaign in our primary, they might be surprised to find out that the cost of milk, like the cost of oil, has skyrocketed over the last few years. In December 2002, whole milk cost $2.70 a gallon. Last month, $3.78 - a 40 percent increase. And it may go higher. The Department of Agriculture estimates that on average, every person drinks 20 gallons of milk a year. That means Philadelphians are paying $30 million more a year for milk than in 2002.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Baker Supplee, 106, a volunteer leader who could trace her lineage to a signer of the Declaration of Independence, died Wednesday, Feb. 13, at Dunwoody Village in Newtown Square. Mrs. Supplee was the widow of Henderson Supplee Jr., past president and chairman of the former Atlantic Refining Co. He chaired the Federal Reserve Board of Philadelphia and was a charter trustee of Princeton University. Mrs. Supplee's attention was focused chiefly on home, family, and garden, but her public role consisted of leading various volunteer efforts for health-based organizations.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
GENTLEMEN prefer blondes. This guy prefers Swiss. As in cheese - the kind normally found sandwiched between corned beef and rye on a Reuben. But this particular man is using his dairy products to satisfy a different craving. The Mayfair Town Watch reported yesterday on its Facebook page that the "Swiss Cheese Pervert" has been terrorizing neighborhood women. According to the group, the suspect, a heavyset white man estimated to be in his late 40s or early 50s, approaches women while driving a silver or black sedan with his genitals exposed.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Baker Supplee, 106, a volunteer leader who could trace her lineage to a signer of the Declaration of Independence, died Wednesday, Feb. 13, at Dunwoody Village in Newtown Square. Mrs. Supplee was the widow of Henderson Supplee Jr., past president and chairman of the former Atlantic Refining Co. He chaired the Federal Reserve Board of Philadelphia and was a charter trustee of Princeton University. Mrs. Supplee's attention was focused chiefly on home, family, and garden, but her public role consisted of leading various volunteer efforts for health-based organizations.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I've heard that calcium can interfere with the absorption of certain prescription medications. Does that include almond milk, yogurt, and cheese, too? Answer: Dairy products and calcium can bind up certain medications in the stomach, reducing their absorption and efficacy. Almond "milk" is not actually a dairy product, however, so it does not have this effect. Medications whose absorption can potentially be reduced by the dairy products or calcium supplements include: Levaquin and Cipro antibiotics; iron supplements; osteoporosis drugs like Fosamax and Actonel; Synthroid (levothyroxine)
FOOD
October 16, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
Our daughter refers to my childhood as "the olden days," so when I told her that the first time I tasted yogurt was in college, she acted as though I had said I didn't have shoes until I was 18 years old. "No way!" she said. Funny she should say that, because "no-whey" yogurt - the unflavored version drained for a minimum of four hours - is a key component of one of her favorite pasta dishes. To millions of American children, yogurt is a fact of life - and dessert. Rather than knowing it as an ingredient, they think it edible only if it contains added sugar in the form of flavorings, fruit, cereal, or even bits of candy.
NEWS
February 14, 2008 | By LANCE HAVER
WHEN SENS. Clinton and Obama come to Pennsylvania to campaign in our primary, they might be surprised to find out that the cost of milk, like the cost of oil, has skyrocketed over the last few years. In December 2002, whole milk cost $2.70 a gallon. Last month, $3.78 - a 40 percent increase. And it may go higher. The Department of Agriculture estimates that on average, every person drinks 20 gallons of milk a year. That means Philadelphians are paying $30 million more a year for milk than in 2002.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2007
Meet the luckiest man in the world. Ernie Pinckney gets paid by Turkey Hill Dairy of Lancaster to eat ice cream. He also fields questions from the curious and passionate about the frozen treats for the company's blog at http://icecreamjournal . turkeyhill.com . Pinckney, 69, whose official title is special plant project coordinator, makes sure the quality and taste of the company's ice cream are consistent. He makes sure that the chocolates are sufficiently chocolaty and that swirls of flavor are in both the bottom and the top of the container.
NEWS
August 4, 2001
Milk is bad for you? Deanna Rose's claims (letter, July 27) that milk prevents osteoporosis and other illnesses is based on science that was disproved long ago. We now know that dairy products contribute to osteoporosis, diabetes, ADHD and a host of other diseases. Cow's milk is laced with antibiotics, hormones and proteins that are essentially poisons to the body. Did she earn her degree from the National Dairy Association? Matt Schweder, Lexington, Ky. Deanna Rose: Dairy products are good for nobody but baby cows; that's who God intended it for. Milk does not cause good strong bones; green vegetables do. As a health/nutrition consultant, I thank the Daily News for presenting both sides of the controversial milk issue.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first strike in the 97-year history of Wawa Inc., called by unions representing 2 percent of the company's workforce, appeared to have little impact yesterday on the company's 510 convenience stores or dairy customers. But the Teamsters' locals, representing 268 Wawa drivers and warehouse workers, vowed to make the strike a cause supported by the company's customers and appealed to other union members to support the walkout, which started late Sunday. A Wawa spokeswoman said that the strike by members of Teamsters Locals 463 and 473 had little immediate effect on retail customers or on deliveries to its stores in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia.
FOOD
June 14, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
June is Dairy Month, and although there's no formal observance, the American Dairy Association and Dairy Council have stepped forward to answer some commonly asked questions about milk and cheese. Q. What does the expiration date on a carton of milk really mean? A. The expiration date is used as a guide for grocery retailers and ensures that you are being sold a fresh product. Once you bring milk home, it remains fresh for 7 to 10 days beyond this date - if refrigerated at 35 to 45 degrees.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1993 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kraft General Foods yesterday said it would close the Philadelphia headquarters of its National Dairy Products Corp., which employs 203 people. The company said it expected that at least half the 165 management employees would be transferred to other Kraft and General Foods offices in White Plains, N.Y., and Glenview, Ill. The others will be laid off, but may be offered other jobs with Kraft. The office, in Seven Penn Center, manages several dairy food brands, including its Sealtest and Cool Whip frozen desserts and the company's sour cream, cheese and yogurt brands.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|