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NEWS
February 17, 1998 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ask anyone in these parts, and he'll tell you: The name of this one-street speck on the map used to fit. Here, in a sprawling, old, tin-roofed dairy converted into shops, a glassblower shapes vases and lamps, and potters wrap their hands around wet clay. Drawn by the green road sign - HARMONY, POPULATION 18 - tourists can while away a peaceful hour or two before heading on up Highway 1 to nearby Hearst Castle or Big Sur. Cows roam across the rolling green hills. Birds twitter in the silvery loquat trees.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
A relative videotaped the event last May as Horace Haenn, born in the horse-and-buggy era of the last century, blew out the candles on his 100th- birthday cake. As the tape was played back and his visage instantly presented to Haenn through the wonders of modern technology, the old man, hard of hearing but sharp of intellect, smiled with great interest. "As the world changed, he just took it in stride. He went with the flow. Maybe that's why he lived to be 100," Haenn's daughter, Eleanor Miller, said yesterday, as she prepared for funeral services for her father.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having weathered the economic ups and downs of farming and, yes, the weather itself, members of the Linvill family are celebrating what they call their crowning success: surviving 100 years in a volatile business. These days, the family stead in the heart of Delaware County is as much county fair and education as it is produce, but from all indications it is a thriving enterprise. Growing from a 10-cow dairy farm dairy to a 300-acre fruit-and-vegetable complex on West Knowlton Road in Middletown Township, Linvilla Orchards has evolved into quite the popular venue.
NEWS
January 16, 1990
STOP CALCULATING AUTO PREMIUMS BY ZIP CODE Philadelphians need a class-action suit against insurance companies and officials responsible for discrimination against Philadelphia residents. A Reuters news service article published last month by The Inquirer reported that California was "outlawing the use of simple territory, or postal ZIP code ratings, as the basis for setting rates. . . . rates would be determined primarily by three factors: A motorist's driving record, the number of miles driven annually, a motorists length of driving experience.
FOOD
September 19, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
The old laundry paddle is retired, wedged beside the blackboard in our kitchen, a totem now. Its handle is sawed off to utensil-height, a hole drilled in it for hanging, its blade worn smooth as river stone. Fritz Blank, who once used it to stir his grand copper pots, bequeathed it to me - autographed, for good measure - as he was packing up his haute French classic Deux Cheminees at 12th and Locust, getting ready to decamp with his cat Bobo to Thailand. That was seven years ago. And it hasn't stirred since: It seemed unseemly to dunk the thing - so accustomed to the likes of truffled sauce Perigord - in our more prosaic chicken paprikash, fish stews, and Frog-Commissary vegetarian chili.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Perhaps you're one of the 5,000 people who volunteered to clean up Germantown Avenue on Sunday as part of the Presidents' Summit for America's Future - and you're wondering what else you might be able to squeeze in between collecting trash, scrubbing graffiti and sweeping dirt. (Then again, maybe you're not a volunteer and your intention is to stay as far away from Germantown Avenue as possible until the dust settles and everybody goes back home.) You should know, if you don't already, that the Avenue is lined with scores of stores, shops and eateries that are as varied as the neighborhoods it runs through.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Acme Markets intends to build a 1.4-million-square-foot warehouse and distribution complex near Reading, worrying leaders of the union that represents the company's warehouse workers in Philadelphia. Acme, operated by American Stores Inc., has two warehouses in Philadelphia that together employ about 750 in about 1.1 million square feet, according to Jim Brennan, president of the warehouse workers' union, Teamsters Local 169. The local, fearing that Acme plans to move those operations out of the city, will hold an informational meeting this morning at its headquarters.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1986 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abbotts, Harbisons, and Lehigh Valley are dairy names as synonymous with the Philadelphia area as Tastykake and Campbell Soup. But the fact is, all those milk brands come from the dairies of one company: Johanna Farms of Flemington, N.J. Johanna Farms has been steadily expanding its milk business, and in February bought its chief competitor, Atlantic Processing Inc. (API), an Allentown dairy that sells the Lehigh Valley brand of milk. In a deal estimated at $17 million, Johanna Farms bought all the milk plants run by API and took over all its business accounts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2007
Jeffrey Roberts, author of "The Atlas of American Artisan Cheese," will lead a tasting of cheese and beer from 6-8 tonight at DiBruno Bros., 1730 Chestnut St., Center City. $45, 215-665-9220, ext. 237. At 6:30 tomorrow night, Roberts will compare American and British cheddars at the Tria Fermentation School, 1601 Walnut St., Center City. $50, 215-972-7076. At 11:30 a.m. Saturday, he'll appear at the Fair Food Farmstand at Reading Terminal Market, 12th and Arch streets. And at 7 p.m. Oct. 29, he'll do a book signing at the White Dog Cafe, 3420 Sansom St. Down at the farm Hendricks Farms cheese is available at a handful of area restaurants and at the Headhouse Square market in Center City.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | By Sergio R. Bustos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Earlier this month, police in Chester County arrested three white men with alleged ties to the Revolutionary Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. The trio is accused of placing a burning cross on May 29 in front of a Honey Brook duplex that was home to two minority families. Residents expressed outrage and shock over such an activity in a predominantly affluent area such as Chester County. But state law enforcement authorities and others who track hate crimes say suburbs and rural areas throughout Pennsylvania have become breeding grounds for hate groups in the last three years.
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