CollectionsDairy
IN THE NEWS

Dairy

NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Christine Ziemba, Special to The Inquirer
Rosenberger Dairy plans to replace two commercial buildings and possibly build houses on its property on Route 52 in East Bradford Township. Sketch plans were submitted by the developer, Construction & Design Services of West Chester at the East Bradford Planning Commission meeting Tuesday. The plan calls for tearing down two existing buildings, one used for distributing the company's dairy products and the other a dairy bar. Two buildings would be constructed for retail use, the developer said.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Randall Mikkelsen, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After six years of giving away powdered milk, butter and cheese to millions of poor people, the government soon may not have any more to give. At the same time it has been emptying caves full of surplus dairy products through donations to charitable food-assistance programs, the government has been paying dairy farmers not to produce. Together, the policies have created a shortage of commodities to give away. "As we currently expect things to develop, we will not have the supplies to continue all the donation and export programs that we have had," said Jim Miller, a dairy analyst for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Doreen Diccianni-Novi, Special to The Inquirer
The Middletown Township Planning Commission heard plans to subdivide the former Greenwood Dairy property on the north side of Lincoln Highway, west of the Interstate 95 interchange, into five lots that would include two motels and two restaurants. The 8.6-acre property is owned by the estate of Paul Sauerbry and was occupied by the Greenwood Dairy, which closed several years ago. "It has been recognized for some time that this . . . is an ideal site for a motel/hotel type use," said Thomas Hecker, attorney for the estate.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for David E. Weaver, former owner of a Chester County dairy firm, who died Wednesday. He was 86 and lived in Malvern. Originally from the Great Valley area, Weaver headed the Weaver Dairy Co., a retail milk business that operated in the Paoli-Malvern-Berwyn area, from 1919 to 1958. Active in community affairs, he was past president of the Paoli-Malvern- Berwyn Rotary Club and the Malvern Odd Fellows Lodge. He was a Mason for more than 50 years and was active in the Tall Cedars of Lebanon and the Chosen Friend Encampment 88. He is survived by his wife, Edith Ashton Weaver; a son, E. Noel; two sisters; a brother; two grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.
NEWS
August 17, 2002 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As Candy Hughes told shoppers her philosophy of the perfect peach and her mother hollered "fresh picked today!," the smell of charred history wafted around them at Linvilla Orchards. The orchard's 113-year-old octagonal barn, which housed the heart of this family-owned farm's commercial and tourist operation, burned to its foundation early yesterday. The sight of fire apparatus spraying a steady water stream on the smoldering roof timbers - more than 12 hours after the first fire alarm was sounded - left many near tears in this Delaware County community, and the Linvill family and its employees vowing to be ready for the fall season.
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | by Nicole Weisensee Egan and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writers
An E. Coli outbreak among children who visited a popular Montgomery County pumpkin patch and dairy farm is under investigation by health authorities. Robert Gage, director of the Montgomery County Health Department, said the county has 10 confirmed cases of E. Coli in children who recently visited the farm. "Several" of the children, 10 and younger, are "very seriously ill," he said. He said some contracted hemolytic uremic syndrome, a dangerous complication from E. Coli that can lead to kidney failure, other long-term health problems, and even death.
FOOD
March 31, 2011 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
A fear of falling knows no age or season, but this past winter and a recent physical exam reminded me that time and gravity conspire to make arms, legs, and hips snap like dry twigs. Advice about fighting back has been around for many years and ranges from performing balancing exercises and weight-bearing activities to popping pills that boost calcium, a necessary ingredient in maintaining overall skeletal health. Even so, the most recent science-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans notes that "a significant number of Americans have low bone mass, a risk factor for osteoporosis, which places them at risk of bone fractures.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last weekend in Gap, Merle Ranck got a group of men together at a factory warehouse to build a small red building and attach it to a trailer. Call it a barn-raising. The little dairy barn will be trucked around Chester County, and from it, milkshakes and ice-cream cones will be sold at cow auctions and local fairs. Call it fund-raising. With health-conscious consumers warily eyeing milk and other dairy products, dairy farmers and their friends around the state have found the best target for better sales: the consumer's palate.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | By Joseph Yaskin, Special to The Inquirer
Lehigh Valley Dairy's plan to cut the discharge of pollution from its plant in Upper Gwynedd was approved Monday night by the township Board of Supervisors. The dairy has agreed to improve its sewage treatment system at a cost of about $1 million. The plan was the result of months of negotiations between Lehigh and the Upper Gwynedd-Towamencin Sewer Authority, township solicitor Robert Kerns said. The dairy expects to complete the pollution-control project in October, said the plant's director of operations, Joseph Martin.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ruling by the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board on Wednesday will boost annual payments to struggling Pennsylvania dairy farmers by an estimated $6.7 million, according to Gov. Rendell. "As one of the few states with the ability to affect pricing, Pennsylvania is taking decisive action to help its dairy producers," Rendell said Thursday. The projected payments are small in Pennsylvania's $1.5 billion industry, but given the industry's difficulties, "any revenue that's out there that can be returned to the farmer is positive, no matter how small," said John Frey, executive director of the state's Center for Dairy Excellence.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|