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NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a dilapidated farm building in Gloucester County, Owen Pool tugs at his sweat-stained "Got Milk?" cap, stretches out his bad knee, and tries to make sense of the dairy industry. Pool says he's losing money every time he milks a cow, thanks to a bewildering mix of circumstances that includes a U.S. cheese surplus, the decline of consumer demand in China, and the lack of precipitation in Australia last year. "I talk to this economist in D.C., to try and stay on top of things," said the 71-year-old dairy farmer.
NEWS
April 16, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rich George noticed the brand-new Wawa store, not far from his house, and wondered what the milkmen were doing selling groceries. That was 45 years ago, when Wawa meant uniformed men delivering glass bottles of milk, a delta of cream on top; when the subtle clinking of glass outside front doors and vestibules might be the first clue that daylight was spreading across the sky. In 1964, the inelegant terms Wawa and grocery might have been...
BUSINESS
April 12, 2009 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lancaster County dairy farmer Dale R. Hershey recently spent some sleepless nights riding his stationary bicycle, debating whether to endure an expected $70,000 loss this year or sell out. Hershey, 61, lost $10,000 in February - his milk check was half what it was a year ago because of a breathtaking collapse in milk prices. "When you're losing money every day, it just sort of takes the love out of what you do," he said last week. Partners with two brothers on a property that has been in the family since 1867, and where last week alfalfa and rye fields were a lush green, Hershey decided to stick it out, partly because he believes the worst is over.
FOOD
October 16, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
Our daughter refers to my childhood as "the olden days," so when I told her that the first time I tasted yogurt was in college, she acted as though I had said I didn't have shoes until I was 18 years old. "No way!" she said. Funny she should say that, because "no-whey" yogurt - the unflavored version drained for a minimum of four hours - is a key component of one of her favorite pasta dishes. To millions of American children, yogurt is a fact of life - and dessert. Rather than knowing it as an ingredient, they think it edible only if it contains added sugar in the form of flavorings, fruit, cereal, or even bits of candy.
NEWS
July 10, 2008 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Bishop VI, 98, a man with his head in the law and his heart in dairy farming, died June 27 at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. Mr. Bishop had lived in Radnor and at Ogston, the family's 1,000-acre dairy farm in Columbus, Burlington County, where he grew up and where he became one of the most respected herdsmen of Jersey cows in the country. Mr. Bishop also was a respected lawyer, practicing for Dechert in Philadelphia from 1936 until he retired in 1976, heading its fiduciary department for many years and once serving as its managing partner.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of J&J Snack Foods Corp. fell yesterday after the Pennsauken baker and frozen-drink maker said high flour and dairy costs had eaten into quarterly profits. J&J shares lost 4.68 percent of their value, closing at $33.00 in Nasdaq trading, after the company said sales rose but profits fell in the three months ending Sept. 29. The company's products include soft pretzels, cookies and Slush Puppie frozen beverages. The price of wheat "took off like it was shot out of a cannon, and yes we got caught," chairman and chief executive officer Gerald B. Shreiber told investors in a conference call.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2007
Jeffrey Roberts, author of "The Atlas of American Artisan Cheese," will lead a tasting of cheese and beer from 6-8 tonight at DiBruno Bros., 1730 Chestnut St., Center City. $45, 215-665-9220, ext. 237. At 6:30 tomorrow night, Roberts will compare American and British cheddars at the Tria Fermentation School, 1601 Walnut St., Center City. $50, 215-972-7076. At 11:30 a.m. Saturday, he'll appear at the Fair Food Farmstand at Reading Terminal Market, 12th and Arch streets. And at 7 p.m. Oct. 29, he'll do a book signing at the White Dog Cafe, 3420 Sansom St. Down at the farm Hendricks Farms cheese is available at a handful of area restaurants and at the Headhouse Square market in Center City.
NEWS
July 6, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Thompson, 88, of Phoenixville, a dairyman who became a successful golf-course owner, died of renal failure Sunday at home. For more than 20 years, Mr. Thompson operated Maplecroft, a dairy farm, milk-processing and home-delivery operation, and retail store in Phoenixville. In 1981, Mr. Thompson sold his cows and, with his six sons, developed Pickering Valley Golf Course, which opened in 1985 on the site of his former farm. Several years later, he told a reporter that he knew absolutely nothing about the game, but that since opening the course, he observed that golfers were "filled with good spirits" when they headed out to play.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Holsteins rushed nervously out of the long, white cattle truck into their new home, a Bucks County barn that had been empty for seven years. Unlike the 24 cows that arrived Monday from Union County, Rich Wendig, 22, appeared perfectly calm in his ragged, graying John Deere cap - especially for a young man who has just signed on for a life of rising in the middle of the night to milk cows. Wendig - who did not grow up on a farm, but has wanted to be a dairy farmer since childhood - is getting an opportunity that most aspiring dairy farmers can only dream of: financial backing to help build a $70,000 herd that totals 40 cows.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Yardley mother had been sitting on the steps of her favorite ice-cream parlor, eating her cone and plotting. "I plan to be there at least once a week before it closes," she said later. "I'm just buying things and putting them in the freezer and hoping" that all that accumulated ice cream lasts and lasts and lasts. When the Goodnoe Farm Dairy Bar closes forever - at 10 p.m. on Labor Day - Patti Smialkowski hopes she will have enough ice cream banked in her freezer so that the parlor will not be a memory.
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