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NEWS
July 29, 2005 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cold, wet spring followed by a blazing early summer has blessed cornfields and peach orchards, though some crop and dairy farmers have been hurt. "I believe this is probably one of the best growing years for us in a long time," said John Yerkes, co-owner of None Such Farm, a vegetable and berry producer in Bucks County. And in Burlington County, Pete Johnson said "we're having a great year" in the fields of Johnson's Corner Farm. The June hay, however, was too damp, and the heat-stressed dairy cows aren't eating it anyway.
NEWS
March 29, 2005
Last week's congressional hearing on the use of steroids in major league baseball called public attention to an epidemic of substance abuse by more than 500,000 young American athletes. Anabolic steroids, such as testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, zeranol, and other growth hormones, promote muscle growth and strength. However, prolonged use has been implicated in breast, prostate, and testicular cancer, heart disease, sexual and reproductive disorders, immunodeficiencies, and liver damage, as well as abnormal growth and premature sexual development in young girls.
NEWS
March 17, 2005 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Randy Mitchell was sentenced to prison two years ago, he figured he'd be serving time with a bunch of animals. He was right, but not in the way he imagined. "They have personalities. You really bond with them," he said as he groomed Petey, a playful, pregnant Holstein. "I'm showing compassion again. I lost a lot of that because of what I was involved with on the street. " Mitchell, serving a five-year term for burglary and drug possession, is one of 40 inmates who help run the Jones Farm dairy and milk plant, a minimum-security prison in Ewing, Mercer County.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Dick Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The decision to shoot deer on the Chester County farm where the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary students study the care of large animals was a hard one, but one official said they felt was necessary. Still, animal rights activists plan a protest in Philadelphia tomorrow. "The state recommends that a square mile for 10 to 12 deer is adequate. We have 300 on a square mile," said David Nunamaker, an award-winning veterinarian and chairman of clinical studies at Penn's New Bolton Center near London Grove.
NEWS
August 22, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nearly a century's worth of history on Heritage's Dairy is contained in a tall oak-and-glass display cabinet at West Deptford Library. Included are items that memories are made of - old milk crates, glass milk bottles, photographs of delivery trucks, and Guernsey cows hooked to milking machines. The cabinet also contains old newspaper ads on the home delivery of fresh milk and lists the price - 35 cents a quart. The display is the work of the West Deptford Historical Association that formed in 2001, according to April Maska, a 26-year township resident and cochairwoman of the association, to unearth the "rich history" of the township.
NEWS
August 22, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"There is a Sunday Opry at Sunset Park Starting at noon until way after dark The groups are changed, different each week The music is country and can't be beat. " - From "Tribute to Sunset," by Harold J. Webster During the golden age of country music, Sunset Park in Jennersville, Chester County, was known as "the Grand Ole Opry North. " For more than 55 years, the park presented the Who's Who of country music to the fans of our region. The man who established this tradition was G. Roy Waltman, popularly called "Uncle Roy. " And the man who carried the park to a higher level was his son Lawrence A. Waltman.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milk prices are coming off their frothy spring highs. The Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board, which sets minimum wholesale and retail prices, is cutting them by 8 percent starting tomorrow. The main reason? The price of cheese - the biggest market for raw milk and a big influence on its price - has plummeted by 25 percent since April, prompting regulators to reduce base prices. Grocery-store managers said shelf prices would follow, but not necessarily immediately. "We respond to increases and decreases in prices in a timely manner," said Walt Rubel, a spokesman for Acme Markets, which operates 80 stores in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2004 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Higher milk prices have come just in time for many Lancaster County dairy farmers. "Last year, I had to borrow money to keep things going," said David Stoltzfoos, 32, who milks 50 purebred Holsteins on a 70-acre Upper Leacock Township farm that has been in his family for 175 years. "Now, I'm starting to catch up. I'd like to see 12 months of better prices," Stoltzfoos said this month during an afternoon milking, his 8-year-old and 6-year-old sons close at hand. After an 18-month stretch of low prices, Stoltzfoos and other dairy farmers have been buoyed by an 85 percent increase in the average price for 100 pounds of raw milk - to $20.30 in May from a low of $11 last spring.
NEWS
January 29, 2004 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The financial scandal of Italian milk conglomerate Parmalat has reached around the world, threatening hundreds of dairy farms in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Millions of dollars in milk payments could be lost by the farmers if the financially troubled food company defaults on payments to suppliers. Fallout from Parmalat's woes comes as dairy farms in the two states already are disappearing at an alarming rate, in part because of two years of record-low milk prices. Pennsylvania farmers could lose as much as $5 million a month in milk payments and New Jersey about $1 million a month, according to officials in each state.
REAL_ESTATE
January 9, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Some folks who live there say Sharples Works, crafted from a 19th-century dairy-processing plant, is the cr?me de la cr?me of local rental communities. "I think it's one of the best maintained properties in the area. The grounds are very beautiful . . . with so many different kinds of mature trees, and beautiful landscaping," said Sharon Paul, who is in her 50s. "What brought me here was the character of Sharples Works, which is an historic landmark. Much of the old creamery has been kept as it was in the old days - the brickwork, lots of beams, and the old woodwork in the apartments and the lobby.
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