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Dan Aykroyd

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1991 | By Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
Head for the hills! Lock up the children! They've let Dan Aykroyd direct a movie! The comic sensibility that made "Doctor Detroit," "The Couch Trip" and "Loose Cannons" such enriching film classics is fully unleashed in "Nothing but Trouble. " The story, cooked up by Aykroyd and his brother, Peter, is supposed to be a sure-fire laugh-getter about yuppies who fall into a small-town, American Gothic speed trap. Chevy Chase is the rich financial consultant encouraged by his passengers - a lawyer played by Demi Moore, and Taylor Negron and Bertila Damas as sibling "Brazillionaire" clients - to try to outrun a police cruiser in the rust-belt principality of Valkenvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT'S A crisp autumn night, you're at a house party with some friends, and everyone's getting thirsty. There's good music, good food, good people - heck, maybe a couple of wild and crazy guys are making a scene on the dance floor - but the only thing you can find to drink is unrelentingly bad liquor. Who you gonna call? Dan Aykroyd. The Hollywood icon feels your pain, consumer of bad booze. He had some unfortunate encounters in the past with the perfectly awful tequila and vodka sold near his summer home in Canada.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Great Outdoors" is 90 minutes of unfunny gags written by John Hughes and starring John Candy and Dan Aykroyd. Who are these people? John Candy is a walking fat joke who has built an entire career on his girth. The joke wasn't funny to begin with and has grown progressively less funny with every stupid picture he has made. Dan Aykroyd, who is quickly moving up to Candy's major league lard level, does a fast-talk schtick that has worked in limited doses (see "Ghostbusters")
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1987 | By GENE SISKEL, Special to the Daily News
He's got the walk right, the clothes right, and, most important, the manner of speech right. With his tongue planted firmly in his cheek with obvious affection, Dan Aykroyd gives the performance of his career as the namesake nephew and '80s clone of detective sergeant Joe Friday in the movie version of "Dragnet," now playing in Philadelphia-area theaters. On TV "Dragnet" ran from Jan. 3, 1952, to Sept. 20, 1970, with lantern- jawed, monosyllabic Jack Webb playing Joe Friday as the quintessential by- the-book lawman.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Nothing but Trouble, Dan Aykroyd's directorial debut, has the desperation - but, alas, not the humor - of one of those late-night TV ads on which some local huckster will do anything to get your attention. This film boasts toxic waste! Victorian dungeons! Mass graves! Aykroyd in zombie makeup! John Candy in drag! Boredom! The premise of the movie starring Aykroyd, Candy, Chevy Chase and Demi Moore, is that once a motorist strays from the New Jersey Turnpike, all routes lead to speed-trap hell.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Dragnet," a comedy starring Dan Aykroyd, Tom Hanks, Christopher Plummer, Dabney Coleman and Harry Morgan. Directed by Tom Mankiewicz. Screenplay by Dan Aykroyd, Tom Mankiewicz and Alan Zweibel. Running time: 103 minutes. A Universal release. At area theaters. First "The Untouchables. " Now "Dragnet. " There's only one old cop-show left that hasn't yet gotten the big-screen treatment: Expect "Adam-12: The Movie" to arrive at your local theater this time next year. Unlike Brian De Palma's "Untouchables," "Dragnet" is a comedy, which is a good thing; it would be hard to say, "Just the facts, ma'am," with a straight face.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
(Opening fanfare) DUM-de-dum-dum. The review you are about to read is true. Only the names have been changed, to alert the innocent that this is a new movie and not the old TV show. Just the facts, ma'am? Dragnet is 110 minutes of PG-13, by-the-book comedy that never exceeds the speed limit - or anyone's expectations. As the late Sgt. Joe Friday's namesake nephew, Dan Aykroyd plays the statute-spouting flatfoot with a spit-polish on his wingtips and vice-busting on his brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Call it Trading Places II, for what is The Couch Trip but a manic Dan Aykroyd comedy in which a have-not and a have (in this case a mental hospital in-patient and his analyst) reverse roles? Or call it Beverly Hills Shrink, for what is The Couch Trip but an action farce in which a Midwestern dude goes to Rodeo Drive and comically reforms fat-cat professionals? Though brazenly derivative of recent comedy successes, Michael Ritchie's The Couch Trip has a wacko originality. And its satire of psychiatry is positively therapeutic.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
Like his fellow Not Ready For Prime Time Players from the salad days of "Saturday Night Live," Dan Aykroyd has had a disappointing track record on the big screen - bombing in the miserable "1941" and "Dr. Detroit," brightening up the mediocre "Dragnet. " He has fared best playing straight man to the more luminous comic talents of John Belushi in "The Blues Brothers," Eddie Murphy in "Trading Places" and Bill Murray in "Ghostbusters. " I have always loved Aykroyd's TV lunacy - from the wild and crazy Czechoslovakian playboy brother he did with Steve Martin to the near-rabid Fish-O-Matic salesman who extols the benefits of his blender while the thing demolishes a fish in truly nauseating fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The Second City, Chicago's improv sketch comedy theater, surely has extended its Windy City reach with comic legends such as John Belushi, John Candy, Joan Rivers, Alan Arkin, Bob Odenkirk, Adam McKay, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Tina Fey, Cecily Strong, Aidy Bryant, Dan Aykroyd, and Bill Murray. Still, the moment someone mentions the troupe or its school, Chicago rears its ugly head. "I am a member of one of Second City's touring companies, three of them, all based out of Chicago," says comedian Andrew Knox, who managed to get out of town long enough to perform on a cruise ship for nearly five months - albeit a Second City-based excursion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The Second City, Chicago's improv sketch comedy theater, surely has extended its Windy City reach with comic legends such as John Belushi, John Candy, Joan Rivers, Alan Arkin, Bob Odenkirk, Adam McKay, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Tina Fey, Cecily Strong, Aidy Bryant, Dan Aykroyd, and Bill Murray. Still, the moment someone mentions the troupe or its school, Chicago rears its ugly head. "I am a member of one of Second City's touring companies, three of them, all based out of Chicago," says comedian Andrew Knox, who managed to get out of town long enough to perform on a cruise ship for nearly five months - albeit a Second City-based excursion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT'S A crisp autumn night, you're at a house party with some friends, and everyone's getting thirsty. There's good music, good food, good people - heck, maybe a couple of wild and crazy guys are making a scene on the dance floor - but the only thing you can find to drink is unrelentingly bad liquor. Who you gonna call? Dan Aykroyd. The Hollywood icon feels your pain, consumer of bad booze. He had some unfortunate encounters in the past with the perfectly awful tequila and vodka sold near his summer home in Canada.
NEWS
December 1, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ocean's 12 is due to open Dec. 10, and the flick's publicity machinery seems to be ailing pretty badly: First, Julia Roberts went off and gave birth to twins last weekend, and now star George Clooney is laid up with a ruptured disk. He had to cancel scheduled appearances not only on Good Morning America and The Daily Show, but even on PBS's still-middle-but-desperately-aiming-to-be-highbrow Charlie Rose show. Clooney's rep, obviously a wet blanket at cocktail parties, would not disclose how or when the boo-boo occurred, nor whether there is anyone around to kiss it away.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1992 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Comedies about family relations top this week's list of new videos. FATHER OF THE BRIDE (1991) (Touchstone) $94.95. 105 minutes. Steve Martin, Diane Keaton, Kimberly Williams, Martin Short. This update of Vincente Minnelli's 1950 film works because Martin, as George Banks, and newcomer Williams, as child Annie, turn what was a story of paternal regret into a valentine to father/daughter love. Short is hilarious as the wedding coordinator who speaks an unintelligible tongue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1991 | By Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
Head for the hills! Lock up the children! They've let Dan Aykroyd direct a movie! The comic sensibility that made "Doctor Detroit," "The Couch Trip" and "Loose Cannons" such enriching film classics is fully unleashed in "Nothing but Trouble. " The story, cooked up by Aykroyd and his brother, Peter, is supposed to be a sure-fire laugh-getter about yuppies who fall into a small-town, American Gothic speed trap. Chevy Chase is the rich financial consultant encouraged by his passengers - a lawyer played by Demi Moore, and Taylor Negron and Bertila Damas as sibling "Brazillionaire" clients - to try to outrun a police cruiser in the rust-belt principality of Valkenvania.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Nothing but Trouble, Dan Aykroyd's directorial debut, has the desperation - but, alas, not the humor - of one of those late-night TV ads on which some local huckster will do anything to get your attention. This film boasts toxic waste! Victorian dungeons! Mass graves! Aykroyd in zombie makeup! John Candy in drag! Boredom! The premise of the movie starring Aykroyd, Candy, Chevy Chase and Demi Moore, is that once a motorist strays from the New Jersey Turnpike, all routes lead to speed-trap hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Great Outdoors may be the only place roomy enough for its stars, Dan Aykroyd and John Candy. It says something that the film's wittiest visual joke is the sight of Candy and his jeep: Does the man disembark from the vehicle, or vice versa? In this, the third John Hughes comedy released in the last six months (What! You've forgotten Planes, Trains and Automobiles, and She's Having a Baby ?), brothers-in-law Aykroyd and Candy take their families to the Wisconsin woods. Roman Craig (Aykroyd)
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Great Outdoors" is 90 minutes of unfunny gags written by John Hughes and starring John Candy and Dan Aykroyd. Who are these people? John Candy is a walking fat joke who has built an entire career on his girth. The joke wasn't funny to begin with and has grown progressively less funny with every stupid picture he has made. Dan Aykroyd, who is quickly moving up to Candy's major league lard level, does a fast-talk schtick that has worked in limited doses (see "Ghostbusters")
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Sources: Marilyn Beck, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Daily News, USA Today, New York magazine and the Associated Press
PLANNED PARENTHOOD Dan Aykroyd, 35, and Donna Dixon, 30ish, are living a life that could be titled "thirtysomethingelse. " This is a life of finely honed anxiety that can only be maintained when you have the money to really do it right. Like, right now she's spending a lot of time filling out big, boring forms so that the Filipino couple who tended them during the filming of their mutual 1985 movie "Spies Like Us" can get work permits to come to California to take care of the Aykroyd-Dixon children.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
Like his fellow Not Ready For Prime Time Players from the salad days of "Saturday Night Live," Dan Aykroyd has had a disappointing track record on the big screen - bombing in the miserable "1941" and "Dr. Detroit," brightening up the mediocre "Dragnet. " He has fared best playing straight man to the more luminous comic talents of John Belushi in "The Blues Brothers," Eddie Murphy in "Trading Places" and Bill Murray in "Ghostbusters. " I have always loved Aykroyd's TV lunacy - from the wild and crazy Czechoslovakian playboy brother he did with Steve Martin to the near-rabid Fish-O-Matic salesman who extols the benefits of his blender while the thing demolishes a fish in truly nauseating fashion.
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