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Dance Ensemble

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NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
In New York's "downtown" community of bustling gallery-hoppers and dozing winos, of polished brass and crumbling brick, there also dwells the hub of post-modern dance. It's a low-key world compared with SoHo's art scene, but it nonetheless has a perpetual supply of big names about to become bigger. Bebe Miller is one of them, and yet her career shares the contradictions of the neighborhood in which she lives and works. Although she has received her share of fellowships, awards and commissions in the mere four years she has had her own company ("I have never had to produce my own season," she says with some pride)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
The incomparable Red Star Red Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, created by the Soviet Union's Strategic Missile Forces in 1977, might sound like a group you'd be afraid to run into in Red Square. But despite outward signs of a military presence at the Academy of Music on Monday night (a stony-faced chorus and introductions from soldiers), their performance spoke of friendship, love and other human concerns. Meadowland by Leonid Knipper, the program notes said, told a tale of soldiers going off to war, but rather than telling the story from the state's side, it was spun compassionately from the perspective of the soldiers' wives and girlfriends.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in North Philadelphia in the 1930s, Robert Crowder began drumming on wooden crates and other found objects. He quickly grasped the fundamentals of drumming, but he wanted to learn more about this seminal African art form. Inspired by acclaimed percussionists from around the world, such as Ladji Camara of Guinea, Chano Pozo and Desi Arnaz of Cuba, and Saka Acquaye of Ghana, Mr. Crowder dedicated his life to African drumming, leaving a vast legacy in Philadelphia. Mr. Crowder, 82, who founded a dance and drum ensemble and played with many renowned musicians, including saxophonist John Coltrane and pianist McCoy Tyner, died Friday, Nov. 30, of a stroke at his West Philadelphia home.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / BILL CAIN
The 12th Annual Children's Arts Festival was held last weekend on the grounds of the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works and Fonthill in Doylestown. The event was sponsored by the Bucks County Department of Parks and Recreation and included a dance ensemble, juggling, story-telling, magic, puppets and a hayride. Children also had a chance to show off their artistic abilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Almost 20,000 children attended last year's Mann Center concerts for young people, continuing the facility's long-standing tradition of free programs. This year's concerts focus on the artistic contributions of international cultures with a wide range of performing groups designed to captivate young imaginations. Three shows in this series are coming up, all on Mondays at 11 a.m., and all guaranteed to involve kids as well as parents. They're free (first-come, first-serve seating)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1993 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community celebrates Latin culture with its 10th annual Feria del Barrio on Sept. 12. Some of the city's best Latino musicians and entertainers will be featured. The festival begins at 1 p.m. with a traditional Caribbean comparsa (carnival parade), led by the percussion ensemble Los Rumberos de la Cinco. After that, it's nonstop music and dancing, with performances by Philareyto, a dance ensemble; Edgardo Cintron y Tempo Noventa, a salsa, charanga and Latin jazz band; singer Minnie Acosta with guitarist Arturito Rivera, and the Afro- Cuban music group Son de la Loma.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The message of the African war dance was relentless defiance. For every man and woman cut down in battle, thousands will rise up in their place. As three dancers from the Arthur Hall Afro-American Dance Ensemble moved fiercely around the stage of the Roslyn Elementary School, another slain soldier was remembered - the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In a program to honor the legacy of the slain civil rights leader, students gathered in the gymnasium Wednesday for a performance by dancers and percussionists from the dance ensemble, the oldest dance troupe in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
On Saturday, Penn Museum will present the 21st Annual Celebration of African Cultures, honoring the traditions of Africa and its Diaspora. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., the celebration will feature music, dancing, storytelling, arts and crafts, games, culture, and more. At 11:30, Momma Sandi will tell stories that combine songs with movement and rhythm. Children and their families can create their own African-inspired masks from noon to 2, and they can create and play the African game of mancala from 11 to 3. Rashida Watson from Silk Tent will give a show-and-tell talk on "The Meaning of Beads" from 11 to 11:45.
NEWS
February 11, 2005 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The folks at the Chester County Historical Society are taking Black History Month literally. Tomorrow, the society will host a workshop on using its treasure trove of resources, which date to the 17th century, to research black history in the county. The county archives, for example, include records of children born to slaves after March 1, 1780. The 10 a.m. workshop opens a daylong series of free events at the society's West Chester headquarters to commemorate Black History Month.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
A highlight of the 21-day El Festival Cubano was to have been the first appearance in Philadelphia by lead dancers from Conjunto Folklorico Cutumba, a dance company based in Santiago de Cuba. However, due to last-minute visa problems, only two of the group were able to get to the United States to perform here Friday. After working all week with the Philadelphia-based Kulu Mele African American Drum and Dance Ensemble, Cutumba's principal dancer, Odalis Armi?on Devrot, and its director, Idalberto Bandera Sid?, collaborated with the local group in a performance in the Art Sanctuary at the Church of the Advocate at 18th and Diamond Streets.
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NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in North Philadelphia in the 1930s, Robert Crowder began drumming on wooden crates and other found objects. He quickly grasped the fundamentals of drumming, but he wanted to learn more about this seminal African art form. Inspired by acclaimed percussionists from around the world, such as Ladji Camara of Guinea, Chano Pozo and Desi Arnaz of Cuba, and Saka Acquaye of Ghana, Mr. Crowder dedicated his life to African drumming, leaving a vast legacy in Philadelphia. Mr. Crowder, 82, who founded a dance and drum ensemble and played with many renowned musicians, including saxophonist John Coltrane and pianist McCoy Tyner, died Friday, Nov. 30, of a stroke at his West Philadelphia home.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
This can't be it - can it? This tiny, run-down storefront on Mount Ephraim Avenue can't be the Unity Community Center of South Jersey Inc., the place that has produced the acclaimed Universal African Dance and Drum Ensemble, hailed as one of the best performing-arts organizations in the entire nation. Yes, I said nation . You have to see these young people perform to truly appreciate them. On stage, they're energy personified - a dozen or more girls, a few as young as 2, clad in traditional West African clothing, performing leaping, kinetic choreography, fueled by a cadre of nonstop drummers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
On Saturday, Penn Museum will present the 21st Annual Celebration of African Cultures, honoring the traditions of Africa and its Diaspora. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., the celebration will feature music, dancing, storytelling, arts and crafts, games, culture, and more. At 11:30, Momma Sandi will tell stories that combine songs with movement and rhythm. Children and their families can create their own African-inspired masks from noon to 2, and they can create and play the African game of mancala from 11 to 3. Rashida Watson from Silk Tent will give a show-and-tell talk on "The Meaning of Beads" from 11 to 11:45.
NEWS
January 8, 2009 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
"Mission accomplished," Dorothy Wilkie announced last month when she and her company returned to Philadelphia from a two-week dance residency in the West African nation of Guinea. The mission had been to acquire new choreography for K?l? M?l? African Dance & Drum Ensemble, which Wilkie directs. But in Guinea, where temperatures were high and political tensions higher, company members also had their eyes opened, their artistic and cultural horizons expanded and - with one exception - just missed experiencing a coup.
NEWS
February 12, 2006 | Inquirer staff
What it is: The Camden-based group will perform at 7 p.m. Friday at Buckingham Friends School in the first event of the Children's Cultural Center's Special Events Series for Families, which resumes after a six-year hiatus. The first performance in the four-event series, which is aimed at families with young children, recognizes Black History Month. The Universal African Dance & Drum Ensemble is known for its electrifying shows, featuring stilt walkers, dancers, drummers, grand masquerades, and an acrobatic display.
NEWS
February 11, 2005 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The folks at the Chester County Historical Society are taking Black History Month literally. Tomorrow, the society will host a workshop on using its treasure trove of resources, which date to the 17th century, to research black history in the county. The county archives, for example, include records of children born to slaves after March 1, 1780. The 10 a.m. workshop opens a daylong series of free events at the society's West Chester headquarters to commemorate Black History Month.
NEWS
May 2, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Never mind the Vivaldi strains in the background. Four dancers in tuxedo coats and baggy jeans quickly exploit the music's sharp highs and lows with a burst of break-dancing and a fusion of hip-hop and classical moves. Talk about rare choreography. The piece is called "Out of Context," and is it ever. Kathy Wood, a 61-year-old retired high school dance teacher whose all-girl, all-white drill and dance teams won several Texas state championships in the 1970s, has teamed with four urban street dancers to produce a fresh, eye-popping act now on a national tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Almost 20,000 children attended last year's Mann Center concerts for young people, continuing the facility's long-standing tradition of free programs. This year's concerts focus on the artistic contributions of international cultures with a wide range of performing groups designed to captivate young imaginations. Three shows in this series are coming up, all on Mondays at 11 a.m., and all guaranteed to involve kids as well as parents. They're free (first-come, first-serve seating)
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
A highlight of the 21-day El Festival Cubano was to have been the first appearance in Philadelphia by lead dancers from Conjunto Folklorico Cutumba, a dance company based in Santiago de Cuba. However, due to last-minute visa problems, only two of the group were able to get to the United States to perform here Friday. After working all week with the Philadelphia-based Kulu Mele African American Drum and Dance Ensemble, Cutumba's principal dancer, Odalis Armi?on Devrot, and its director, Idalberto Bandera Sid?, collaborated with the local group in a performance in the Art Sanctuary at the Church of the Advocate at 18th and Diamond Streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Turre is principally a trombonist, but he is well-known for playing seashells. Turre, who will play two sets at Zanzibar Blue in a Mellon Jazz Festival show Saturday night, said he has a special relationship with the shells. During the '80s, he was in the brass section for Manny Oquendo's powerful salsa ensemble Conjunto Libre. He had been playing shells for about a decade, but then he began to recognize certain links between instruments in the dance ensemble. "I discovered that there was a real connection between the shell and the hand drum," he said.
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